109

I'm creating an app that uses webpack-dev-server in development alongside react-router.

It seems that webpack-dev-server is built around the assumption that you will have a public entry point at one place (i.e. "/"), whereas react-router allows for an unlimited amount of entry points.

I want the benefits of the webpack-dev-server, especially the hot reloading feature that is great for productivity, but I still want to be able to load routes set in react-router.

How could one implement it such that they work together? Could you run an express server in front of webpack-dev-server in such a way to allow this?

68

I set up a proxy to achieve this:

You have a regular express webserver that serves the index.html on any route, except if its an asset route. if it is an asset, the request gets proxied to the web-dev-server

your react hot entrypoints will still point directly at the webpack dev server, so hot reloading still works.

Let's assume you run webpack-dev-server on 8081 and your proxy at 8080. Your server.js file will look like this:

"use strict";
var webpack = require('webpack');
var WebpackDevServer = require('webpack-dev-server');
var config = require('./make-webpack-config')('dev');

var express = require('express');
var proxy = require('proxy-middleware');
var url = require('url');

## --------your proxy----------------------
var app = express();
## proxy the request for static assets
app.use('/assets', proxy(url.parse('http://localhost:8081/assets')));

app.get('/*', function(req, res) {
    res.sendFile(__dirname + '/index.html');
});


# -----your-webpack-dev-server------------------
var server = new WebpackDevServer(webpack(config), {
    contentBase: __dirname,
    hot: true,
    quiet: false,
    noInfo: false,
    publicPath: "/assets/",

    stats: { colors: true }
});

## run the two servers
server.listen(8081, "localhost", function() {});
app.listen(8080);

now make your entrypoints in the webpack config like so:

    entry: [
        './src/main.js',
        'webpack/hot/dev-server',
        'webpack-dev-server/client?http://localhost:8081'
    ]

note the direct call to 8081 for hotreload

also make sure you pass an absolute url to the output.publicPath option:

    output: {
        publicPath: "http://localhost:8081/assets/",
        // ...
    }
  • 1
    Hey, this is awesome. I actually arrived at this setup shortly before this and was going to post an answer but I think you did a better job. – Nathan Wienert Oct 7 '14 at 19:09
  • 1
    One question, sort of unrelated so I can open a new question if need be but I notice that now the console output from the webpack dev server isn't streamed. Before, you could watch it compile and see the percents rise, now it just block outputs after compilation. – Nathan Wienert Oct 7 '14 at 19:09
  • Nice done. This is exactly how it should be done. I added a note about the output.publicPath option, which should be an absolute url too. – Tobias K. Oct 9 '14 at 9:00
  • 5
    It would be easier just to use a built-in webpack proxy instead. Thus you don't interfere in the server itself, you leave the server pure. Instead, you just do a little (3-5 lines) addition to webpack config. Thanks to that you modify only dev scripts for dev purposes and leave the production code (server.js) in peace (unlike in your version) and imo that's the proper way to go. – jalooc Nov 11 '15 at 10:23
  • 3
    This answer is still correct though a bit dated. More straightforward ways are available now, look for historyApiFallback. – Eugene Kulabuhov May 29 '17 at 13:47
100

You should set historyApiFallback of WebpackDevServer as true for this to work. Here's a small example (tweak to fit your purposes):

var webpack = require('webpack');
var WebpackDevServer = require('webpack-dev-server');

var config = require('./webpack.config');


var port = 4000;
var ip = '0.0.0.0';
new WebpackDevServer(webpack(config), {
    publicPath: config.output.publicPath,
    historyApiFallback: true,
}).listen(port, ip, function (err) {
    if(err) {
        return console.log(err);
    }

    console.log('Listening at ' + ip + ':' + port);
});
  • You will miss the statusbar on top of your index.html, but this works great :) – swennemen Feb 22 '15 at 16:00
  • 7
    This should be the accepted answer. From the webpack dev server docs: "If you are using the HTML5 history API you probably need to serve your index.html in place of 404 responses, which can be done by setting historyApiFallback: true" If I understand the question correctly this will solve the problem. – Sebastian Apr 14 '16 at 16:18
  • so simple... Thank you! – smnbbrv Jun 17 '16 at 8:29
  • 1
    @smnbbrv No probs. It actually uses connect-history-api-fallback underneath and you can pass an object with the middleware specific options if you want instead of just true. – Juho Vepsäläinen Jun 17 '16 at 9:13
  • Any idea how to do this with webpack-dev-middleware? – Don P Mar 2 '17 at 7:53
24

For anyone else that may still be looking for this answer. I put together a simple proxy bypass which achieves this without much hassle and the config goes into the webpack.config.js

I am sure there are much more elegant ways to test for local content using regex, but this works for my needs.

devServer: {
  proxy: { 
    '/**': {  //catch all requests
      target: '/index.html',  //default target
      secure: false,
      bypass: function(req, res, opt){
        //your custom code to check for any exceptions
        //console.log('bypass check', {req: req, res:res, opt: opt});
        if(req.path.indexOf('/img/') !== -1 || req.path.indexOf('/public/') !== -1){
          return '/'
        }

        if (req.headers.accept.indexOf('html') !== -1) {
          return '/index.html';
        }
      }
    }
  }
} 
  • Worked well for me – Nath Oct 3 '16 at 10:32
  • Worked nicely!.. Thanks! – Dhrumil Bhankhar Oct 19 '16 at 7:50
  • 2
    This should be the right answer! – Crysfel Jan 24 '17 at 22:53
  • Still works great in 2019. – Nic Aug 11 at 16:54
10

If you're running webpack-dev-server using CLI, you can configure it through webpack.config.js passing devServer object:

module.exports = {
  entry: "index.js",
  output: {
    filename: "bundle.js"
  },
  devServer: {
    historyApiFallback: true
  }
}

This will redirect to index.html everytime it 404 is encountered.

NOTE: If you're using publicPath, you'll need to pass it to devServer too:

module.exports = {
  entry: "index.js",
  output: {
    filename: "bundle.js",
    publicPath: "admin/dashboard"
  },
  devServer: {
    historyApiFallback: {
      index: "admin/dashboard"
    }
  }
}

You can verify that everything is setup correctly by looking at the first few lines of the output (the part with "404s will fallback to: path").

enter image description here

  • Amazing, exactly what I needed - thank you! – Liran H Sep 13 '18 at 16:29
8

For a more recent answer, the current version of webpack (4.1.1) you can just set this in your webpack.config.js like such:

const webpack = require('webpack');

module.exports = {
    entry: [
      'react-hot-loader/patch',
      './src/index.js'
    ],
    module: {
        rules: [
            {
                test: /\.(js|jsx)$/,
                exclude: /node_modules/,
                use: ['babel-loader']
            },
            {
                test: /\.css$/,
                exclude: /node_modules/,
                use: ['style-loader','css-loader']
            }
        ]
    },
    resolve: {
      extensions: ['*', '.js', '.jsx']  
    },
    output: {
      path: __dirname + '/dist',
      publicPath: '/',
      filename: 'bundle.js'
    },
    plugins: [
      new webpack.HotModuleReplacementPlugin()
    ],
    devServer: {
      contentBase: './dist',
      hot: true,
      historyApiFallback: true
    }
  };

The important part is historyApiFallback: true. No need to run a custom server, just use the cli:

"scripts": {
    "start": "webpack-dev-server --config ./webpack.config.js --mode development"
  },
  • 1
    This worked for me. It's the simplest answer. – Amin Ariana Oct 12 '18 at 16:51
2

I'd like to add to the answer for the case when you run an isomorphic app (i.e. rendering React component server-side.)

In this case you probably also want to automatically reload the server when you change one of your React components. You do this with the piping package. All you have to do is install it and add require("piping")({hook: true}) somewhere in the beginning of you server.js. That's it. The server will restart after you change any component used by it.

This rises another problem though - if you run webpack server from the same process as your express server (as in the accepted answer above), the webpack server will also restart and will recompile your bundle every time. To avoid this you should run your main server and webpack server in different processes so that piping would restart only your express server and won't touch webpack. You can do this with concurrently package. You can find an example of this in react-isomorphic-starterkit. In the package.json he has:

"scripts": {
    ...
    "watch": "node ./node_modules/concurrently/src/main.js --kill-others 'npm run watch-client' 'npm run start'"
  },

which runs both servers simultaneously but in separate processes.

  • Does this mean some files are being watched twice? Such as the shared isomorphic/universal files? – David Sinclair Nov 27 '15 at 6:22
1

historyApiFallback can also be an object instead of a Boolean, containing the routes.

historyApiFallback: navData && {
  rewrites: [
      { from: /route-1-regex/, to: 'route-1-example.html' }
  ]
}
1

May be not in all cases, but seems the publicPath: '/' option in the devServer is easiest solution to fix deep routes issue, see: https://github.com/ReactTraining/react-router/issues/676

0

This worked for me: just simply add the webpack middlewares first and the app.get('*'... index.html resolver later,

so express will first check if the request matches one of the routes provided by webpack (like: /dist/bundle.js or /__webpack_hmr_) and if not, then it will move to the index.html with the * resolver.

ie:

app.use(require('webpack-dev-middleware')(compiler, {
  publicPath: webpackConfig.output.publicPath,
}))
app.use(require('webpack-hot-middleware')(compiler))
app.get('*', function(req, res) {
  sendSomeHtml(res)
})

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