I have a dialog with EditText for input. When I click the "yes" button on dialog, it will validate the input and then close the dialog. However, if the input is wrong, I want to remain in the same dialog. Every time no matter what the input is, the dialog should be automatically closed when I click on the "no" button. How can I disable this? By the way, I have used PositiveButton and NegativeButton for the button on dialog.

18 Answers 18

EDIT: This only works on API 8+ as noted by some of the comments.

This is a late answer, but you can add an onShowListener to the AlertDialog where you can then override the onClickListener of the button.

final AlertDialog dialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(context)
        .setView(v)
        .setTitle(R.string.my_title)
        .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.ok, null) //Set to null. We override the onclick
        .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.cancel, null)
        .create();

dialog.setOnShowListener(new DialogInterface.OnShowListener() {

    @Override
    public void onShow(DialogInterface dialogInterface) {

        Button button = ((AlertDialog) dialog).getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
        button.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {

            @Override
            public void onClick(View view) {
                // TODO Do something

                //Dismiss once everything is OK.
                dialog.dismiss();
            }
        });
    }
});
dialog.show();
  • 6
    Hey, better late than never, I was looking for exactly that, thanks, +1 :) This is an elegant way of adding validation to your dialog, especially when you already have a helper wrapping class to deal with alerts – Guillaume Nov 18 '11 at 23:19
  • 46
    Just as a note - this will only work in API 8+ – Bostone Dec 4 '11 at 2:45
  • 11
    Doesnt work. AlertDialog.Builder.setOnShowListener dont exist. developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… – Leandros Mar 4 '12 at 16:33
  • 4
    With API pre 8, you can call d.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE); as it's public method, but you have to call it show(); has been issued, otherwise zou just get null from it – Hurda Apr 4 '12 at 13:28
  • 13
    You can make this even a tad cleaner by setting a null OnClickListener to the dialog builder (saves the empty "//this will be overridden" listener). – Steve Haley Aug 6 '12 at 11:14
up vote 583 down vote
+100

Here are some solutions for all types of dialogs including a solution for AlertDialog.Builder that will work on all API levels (works below API 8, which the other answer here does not). There are solutions for AlertDialogs using AlertDialog.Builder, DialogFragment, and DialogPreference.

Below are the code examples showing how to override the default common button handler and prevent the dialog from closing for these different forms of dialogs. All the examples show how to prevent the positive button from closing the dialog.

Note: A description of how the dialog closing works under the hood for the base android classes and why the following approaches are chosen follows after the examples, for those who want more details


AlertDialog.Builder - Change default button handler immediately after show()

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
builder.setMessage("Test for preventing dialog close");
builder.setPositiveButton("Test", 
        new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
        {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which)
            {
                //Do nothing here because we override this button later to change the close behaviour. 
                //However, we still need this because on older versions of Android unless we 
                //pass a handler the button doesn't get instantiated
            }
        });
final AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();
dialog.show();
//Overriding the handler immediately after show is probably a better approach than OnShowListener as described below
dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
      {            
          @Override
          public void onClick(View v)
          {
              Boolean wantToCloseDialog = false;
              //Do stuff, possibly set wantToCloseDialog to true then...
              if(wantToCloseDialog)
                  dialog.dismiss();
              //else dialog stays open. Make sure you have an obvious way to close the dialog especially if you set cancellable to false.
          }
      });

DialogFragment - override onResume()

@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
    builder.setMessage("Test for preventing dialog close");
    builder.setPositiveButton("Test", 
        new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
        {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which)
            {
                //Do nothing here because we override this button later to change the close behaviour. 
                //However, we still need this because on older versions of Android unless we 
                //pass a handler the button doesn't get instantiated
            }
        });
    return builder.create();
}

//onStart() is where dialog.show() is actually called on 
//the underlying dialog, so we have to do it there or 
//later in the lifecycle.
//Doing it in onResume() makes sure that even if there is a config change 
//environment that skips onStart then the dialog will still be functioning
//properly after a rotation.
@Override
public void onResume()
{
    super.onResume();    
    final AlertDialog d = (AlertDialog)getDialog();
    if(d != null)
    {
        Button positiveButton = (Button) d.getButton(Dialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
        positiveButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
                {
                    @Override
                    public void onClick(View v)
                    {
                        Boolean wantToCloseDialog = false;
                        //Do stuff, possibly set wantToCloseDialog to true then...
                        if(wantToCloseDialog)
                            d.dismiss();
                        //else dialog stays open. Make sure you have an obvious way to close the dialog especially if you set cancellable to false.
                    }
                });
    }
}

DialogPreference - override showDialog()

@Override
protected void onPrepareDialogBuilder(Builder builder)
{
    super.onPrepareDialogBuilder(builder);
    builder.setPositiveButton("Test", this);   //Set the button here so it gets created
}

@Override
protected void showDialog(Bundle state)
{       
    super.showDialog(state);    //Call show on default first so we can override the handlers

    final AlertDialog d = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
    d.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener()
            {            
                @Override
                public void onClick(View v)
                {
                    Boolean wantToCloseDialog = false;
                    //Do stuff, possibly set wantToCloseDialog to true then...
                    if(wantToCloseDialog)
                        d.dismiss();
                    //else dialog stays open. Make sure you have an obvious way to close the dialog especially if you set cancellable to false.
                }
            });
}

Explanation of approaches:

Looking through Android source code the AlertDialog default implementation works by registering a common button handler to all the actual buttons in OnCreate(). When a button is clicked the common button handler forwards the click event to whatever handler you passed in setButton() then calls dismisses the dialog.

If you wish to prevent a dialog box from closing when one of these buttons is pressed you must replace the common button handler for the actual view of the button. Because it is assigned in OnCreate(), you must replace it after the default OnCreate() implementation is called. OnCreate is called in the process of the show() method. You could create a custom Dialog class and override OnCreate() to call the super.OnCreate() then override the button handlers, but if you make a custom dialog you don't get the Builder for free, in which case what is the point?

So, in using a dialog the way it is designed but with controlling when it is dismissed, one approach is to call dialog.Show() first, then obtain a reference to the button using dialog.getButton() to override the click handler. Another approach is to use setOnShowListener() and implement finding the button view and replacing the handler in the OnShowListener. The functional difference between the two is 'almost' nill, depending on what thread originally creates the dialog instance. Looking through the source code, the onShowListener gets called by a message posted to a handler running on the thread that created that dialog. So, since your OnShowListener is called by a message posted on the message queue it is technically possible that calling your listener is delayed some time after show completes.

Therefore, I believe the safest approach is the first: to call show.Dialog(), then immediately in the same execution path replace the button handlers. Since your code that calls show() will be operating on the main GUI thread, it means whatever code you follow show() with will be executed before any other code on that thread, whereas the timing of the OnShowListener method is at the mercy of the message queue.

  • 11
    This is by far the easiest implementation and works perfectly. I've used AlertDialog.Builder - Change default button handler immediately after show() and it's working like charm. – Reinherd May 10 '13 at 13:04
  • 1
    @sogger dude, I totally boldly edited your amazing answer because in section 1 you had dismiss(); instead of I believe dialog.dismiss(); thanks so much for the awesome answer! – Fattie May 23 '14 at 11:29
  • Is there any way to prevent closing a ProgressDialog when a button is clicked on it? – Joshua Pinter Jul 19 '14 at 17:25
  • @JoshPinter If you have a button in your ProgressDialog, that means you put it in yourself, so you should be able to edit the button logic directly. If you are talking about the back button or clicking off the dialog, you can control that using the setCancellable() methods I think. – Sogger Jul 28 '14 at 18:05
  • 1
    @harsh_v updated the answer to use onResume() for the next person, thanks! – Sogger Mar 17 '17 at 16:33

I've written a simple class (an AlertDialogBuilder) that you can use to disable the auto-dismiss feature when pressing the dialog's buttons.

It is compatible also with Android 1.6, so it doesn't make use of the OnShowListener (which is available only API >= 8).

So, instead of using AlertDialog.Builder you can use this CustomAlertDialogBuilder. The most important part is that you should not call create(), but only the show() method. I've added methods like setCanceledOnTouchOutside() and setOnDismissListener so that you can still set them directly on the builder.

I tested it on Android 1.6, 2.x, 3.x and 4.x so it should work pretty well. If you find some problems please comment here.

package com.droidahead.lib.utils;

import android.app.AlertDialog;
import android.content.Context;
import android.content.DialogInterface;
import android.view.View;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;

public class CustomAlertDialogBuilder extends AlertDialog.Builder {
    /**
     * Click listeners
     */
    private DialogInterface.OnClickListener mPositiveButtonListener = null;
    private DialogInterface.OnClickListener mNegativeButtonListener = null;
    private DialogInterface.OnClickListener mNeutralButtonListener = null;

    /**
     * Buttons text
     */
    private CharSequence mPositiveButtonText = null;
    private CharSequence mNegativeButtonText = null;
    private CharSequence mNeutralButtonText = null;

    private DialogInterface.OnDismissListener mOnDismissListener = null;

    private Boolean mCancelOnTouchOutside = null;

    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder(Context context) {
        super(context);
    }

    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setOnDismissListener (DialogInterface.OnDismissListener listener) {
        mOnDismissListener = listener;
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setNegativeButton(CharSequence text, DialogInterface.OnClickListener listener) {
        mNegativeButtonListener = listener;
        mNegativeButtonText = text;
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setNeutralButton(CharSequence text, DialogInterface.OnClickListener listener) {
        mNeutralButtonListener = listener;
        mNeutralButtonText = text;
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setPositiveButton(CharSequence text, DialogInterface.OnClickListener listener) {
        mPositiveButtonListener = listener;
        mPositiveButtonText = text;
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setNegativeButton(int textId, DialogInterface.OnClickListener listener) {
        setNegativeButton(getContext().getString(textId), listener);
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setNeutralButton(int textId, DialogInterface.OnClickListener listener) {
        setNeutralButton(getContext().getString(textId), listener);
        return this;
    }

    @Override
    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setPositiveButton(int textId, DialogInterface.OnClickListener listener) {
        setPositiveButton(getContext().getString(textId), listener);
        return this;
    }

    public CustomAlertDialogBuilder setCanceledOnTouchOutside (boolean cancelOnTouchOutside) {
        mCancelOnTouchOutside = cancelOnTouchOutside;
        return this;
    }



    @Override
    public AlertDialog create() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException("CustomAlertDialogBuilder.create(): use show() instead..");
    }

    @Override
    public AlertDialog show() {
        final AlertDialog alertDialog = super.create();

        DialogInterface.OnClickListener emptyOnClickListener = new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) { }
        };


        // Enable buttons (needed for Android 1.6) - otherwise later getButton() returns null
        if (mPositiveButtonText != null) {
            alertDialog.setButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE, mPositiveButtonText, emptyOnClickListener);
        }

        if (mNegativeButtonText != null) {
            alertDialog.setButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEGATIVE, mNegativeButtonText, emptyOnClickListener);
        }

        if (mNeutralButtonText != null) {
            alertDialog.setButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEUTRAL, mNeutralButtonText, emptyOnClickListener);
        }

        // Set OnDismissListener if available
        if (mOnDismissListener != null) {
            alertDialog.setOnDismissListener(mOnDismissListener);
        }

        if (mCancelOnTouchOutside != null) {
            alertDialog.setCanceledOnTouchOutside(mCancelOnTouchOutside);
        }

        alertDialog.show();

        // Set the OnClickListener directly on the Button object, avoiding the auto-dismiss feature
        // IMPORTANT: this must be after alert.show(), otherwise the button doesn't exist..
        // If the listeners are null don't do anything so that they will still dismiss the dialog when clicked
        if (mPositiveButtonListener != null) {
            alertDialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    mPositiveButtonListener.onClick(alertDialog, AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
                }
            });
        }

        if (mNegativeButtonListener != null) {
            alertDialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEGATIVE).setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    mNegativeButtonListener.onClick(alertDialog, AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEGATIVE);
                }
            });
        }

        if (mNeutralButtonListener != null) {
            alertDialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEUTRAL).setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {

                @Override
                public void onClick(View v) {
                    mNeutralButtonListener.onClick(alertDialog, AlertDialog.BUTTON_NEUTRAL);
                }
            });
        }

        return alertDialog;
    }   
}

EDIT Here is a small example on how to use the CustomAlertDialogBuilder:

// Create the CustomAlertDialogBuilder
CustomAlertDialogBuilder dialogBuilder = new CustomAlertDialogBuilder(context);

// Set the usual data, as you would do with AlertDialog.Builder
dialogBuilder.setIcon(R.drawable.icon);
dialogBuilder.setTitle("Dialog title");
dialogBuilder.setMessage("Some text..");

// Set your buttons OnClickListeners
dialogBuilder.setPositiveButton ("Button 1", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
    public void onClick (DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
        // Do something...

        // Dialog will not dismiss when the button is clicked
        // call dialog.dismiss() to actually dismiss it.
    }
});

// By passing null as the OnClickListener the dialog will dismiss when the button is clicked.               
dialogBuilder.setNegativeButton ("Close", null);

// Set the OnDismissListener (if you need it)       
dialogBuilder.setOnDismissListener(new DialogInterface.OnDismissListener() {
    public void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
        // dialog was just dismissed..
    }
});

// (optional) set whether to dismiss dialog when touching outside
dialogBuilder.setCanceledOnTouchOutside(false);

// Show the dialog
dialogBuilder.show();

Cheers,

Yuvi

  • Nice. But didn't work for me. The Dialog get dismissed nevertheless. – Leandros Mar 4 '12 at 16:25
  • Mmm that sounds strange. I'm using that in my app and only buttons where I explicitly call dialog.dismiss() will dismiss the Dialog. On what Android version you are testing? Can you show your code where you used the CustomAlertDialogBuilder? – YuviDroid Mar 4 '12 at 16:28
  • I think it is caused because of this: (call dialog.show() after onClickListener) pastebin.com/uLnSu5v7 If I click positiveButton they get dismissed if boolean is true... – Leandros Mar 4 '12 at 16:41
  • I didn't test it using Activity.onCreateDialog(). Probably it cannot work in that way. I will edit the 'answer' to include a small example on how I use it. – YuviDroid Mar 4 '12 at 16:47
  • 4
    This works for me with the current edit! However: One more caveat. Builder.getContext() is only available on API 11+. Add a field Context mContext and set it in the constructor instead. – Oleg Vaskevich May 31 '12 at 20:46

Here's something if you are using DialogFragment - which is the recommended way to handle Dialogs anyway.

What happens with AlertDialog's setButton() method (and I imagine the same with AlertDialogBuilder's setPositiveButton() and setNegativeButton()) is that the button you set (e.g. AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE) with it will actually trigger TWO different OnClickListener objects when pressed.

The first being DialogInterface.OnClickListener, which is a parameter to setButton(), setPositiveButton(), and setNegativeButton().

The other is View.OnClickListener, which will be set to automatically dismiss your AlertDialog when any of its button is pressed - and is set by AlertDialog itself.

What you can do is to use setButton() with null as the DialogInterface.OnClickListener, to create the button, and then call your custom action method inside View.OnClickListener. For example,

@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState)
{
    AlertDialog alertDialog = new AlertDialog(getActivity());
    // set more items...
    alertDialog.setButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE, "OK", null);

    return alertDialog;
}

Then, you may override the default AlertDialog's buttons' View.OnClickListener (which would otherwise dismiss the dialog) in the DialogFragment's onResume() method:

@Override
public void onResume()
{
    super.onResume();
    AlertDialog alertDialog = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
    Button okButton = alertDialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
    okButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() { 
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v)
        {
            performOkButtonAction();
        }
    });
}

private void performOkButtonAction() {
    // Do your stuff here
}

You will need to set this in the onResume() method because getButton() will return null until after the dialog has been shown!

This should cause your custom action method to only be called once, and the dialog won't be dismissed by default.

  • 2
    This is the best answer – resource8218 Dec 24 '14 at 0:20
  • Simply brilliant. Thanks a lot. – gaurav jain Jun 16 '15 at 6:56
  • it does not work with support library – user3871754 Feb 25 '16 at 13:53
  • U saved my day thank you so much – Aliy Mar 19 at 17:24

An alternate solution

I would like to present an alternate answer from a UX perspective.

Why would you want to prevent a dialog from closing when a button is clicked? Presumably it is because you have a custom dialog in which the user hasn't made a choice or hasn't completely filled everything out yet. And if they are not finished, then you shouldn't allow them to click the positive button at all. Just disable it until everything is ready.

The other answers here give lots of tricks for overriding the positive button click. If that were important to do, wouldn't Android have made a convenient method to do it? They didn't.

Instead, the Dialogs design guide shows an example of such a situation. The OK button is disabled until the user makes a choice. No overriding tricks are necessary at all. It is obvious to the user that something still needs to be done before going on.

enter image description here

How to disable the positive button

See the Android documentation for creating a custom dialog layout. It recommends that you place your AlertDialog inside a DialogFragment. Then all you need to do is set listeners on the layout elements to know when to enable or disable the positive button.

The positive button can be disabled like this:

AlertDialog dialog = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setEnabled(false);

Here is an entire working DialogFragment with a disabled positive button such as might be used in the image above.

import android.support.v4.app.DialogFragment;
import android.support.v7.app.AlertDialog;

public class MyDialogFragment extends DialogFragment {

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

        // inflate the custom dialog layout
        LayoutInflater inflater = getActivity().getLayoutInflater();
        View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.my_dialog_layout, null);

        // add a listener to the radio buttons
        RadioGroup radioGroup = (RadioGroup) view.findViewById(R.id.radio_group);
        radioGroup.setOnCheckedChangeListener(new RadioGroup.OnCheckedChangeListener() {
            @Override
            public void onCheckedChanged(RadioGroup radioGroup, int i) {
                // enable the positive button after a choice has been made
                AlertDialog dialog = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
                dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setEnabled(true);
            }
        });

        // build the alert dialog
        AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
        builder.setView(view)
                .setPositiveButton("OK", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                    @Override
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
                        // TODO: use an interface to pass the user choice back to the activity
                    }
                })
                .setNegativeButton("Cancel", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
                        MyDialogFragment.this.getDialog().cancel();
                    }
                });
        return builder.create();
    }

    @Override
    public void onResume() {
        super.onResume();

        // disable positive button by default
        AlertDialog dialog = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
        dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setEnabled(false);
    }
}

The custom dialog can be run from an activity like this:

MyDialogFragment dialog = new MyDialogFragment();
dialog.show(getFragmentManager(), "MyTag");

Notes

  • For the sake of brevity, I omitted the communication interface to pass the user choice info back to the activity. The documentation shows how this is done, though.
  • The button is still null in onCreateDialog so I disabled it in onResume. This has the undesireable effect of disabling the it again if the user switches to another app and then comes back without dismissing the dialog. This could be solved by also unselecting any user choices or by calling a Runnable from onCreateDialog to disable the button on the next run loop.

    view.post(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            AlertDialog dialog = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
            dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setEnabled(false);
        }
    });
    

Related

  • Very polished solution. I like it! – FonzTech Jun 12 at 15:13

Inspired by Tom's answer, I believe the idea here is:

  • Set the onClickListener during the creation of the dialog to null
  • Then set a onClickListener after the dialog is shown.

You can override the onShowListener like Tom. Alternatively, you can

  1. get the button after calling AlertDialog's show()
  2. set the buttons' onClickListener as follows (slightly more readable I think).

Code:

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(context);
// ...
final AlertDialog dialog = builder.create();
dialog.show();
// now you can override the default onClickListener
Button b = dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
b.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onClick(View view) {
        Log.i(TAG, "ok button is clicked");
        handleClick(dialog);
    }
});

For pre API 8 i solved the problem using a boolean flag, a dismiss listener and calling dialog.show again if in case the content of the editText wasn´t correct. Like this:

case ADD_CLIENT:
        LayoutInflater factoryClient = LayoutInflater.from(this);
        final View EntryViewClient = factoryClient.inflate(
                R.layout.alert_dialog_add_client, null);

        EditText ClientText = (EditText) EntryViewClient
                .findViewById(R.id.client_edit);

        AlertDialog.Builder builderClient = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);
        builderClient
                .setTitle(R.string.alert_dialog_client)
                .setCancelable(false)
                .setView(EntryViewClient)
                .setPositiveButton("Save",
                        new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog,
                                    int whichButton) {
                                EditText newClient = (EditText) EntryViewClient
                                        .findViewById(R.id.client_edit);
                                String newClientString = newClient
                                        .getText().toString();
                                if (checkForEmptyFields(newClientString)) {
                                    //If field is empty show toast and set error flag to true;
                                    Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(),
                                            "Fields cant be empty",
                                            Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                                    add_client_error = true;
                                } else {
                                    //Here save the info and set the error flag to false
                                    add_client_error = false;
                                }
                            }
                        })
                .setNegativeButton("Cancel",
                        new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog,
                                    int id) {
                                add_client_error = false;
                                dialog.cancel();
                            }
                        });
        final AlertDialog alertClient = builderClient.create();
        alertClient.show();

        alertClient
                .setOnDismissListener(new DialogInterface.OnDismissListener() {

                    @Override
                    public void onDismiss(DialogInterface dialog) {
                        //If the error flag was set to true then show the dialog again
                        if (add_client_error == true) {
                            alertClient.show();
                        } else {
                            return;
                        }

                    }
                });
        return true;
  • strange onDismiss not get called, mine is api level 21 – Abhishek K Jun 2 '15 at 7:03

The answer at this link is a simple solution, and which is compatible right back to API 3. It is very similiar to Tom Bollwitt's solution, but without using the less compatible OnShowListener.

Yes, you can. You basically need to:

  1. Create the dialog with DialogBuilder
  2. show() the dialog
  3. Find the buttons in the dialog shown and override their onClickListener

I made minor adaptions to Kamen's code since I was extending an EditTextPreference.

@Override
protected void showDialog(Bundle state) {
  super.showDialog(state);

  class mocl implements OnClickListener{
    private final AlertDialog dialog;
    public mocl(AlertDialog dialog) {
          this.dialog = dialog;
      }
    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {

        //checks if EditText is empty, and if so tells the user via Toast
        //otherwise it closes dialog and calls the EditTextPreference's onClick
        //method to let it know that the button has been pressed

        if (!IntPreference.this.getEditText().getText().toString().equals("")){
        dialog.dismiss();
        IntPreference.this.onClick(dialog,DialogInterface.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
        }
        else {
            Toast t = Toast.makeText(getContext(), "Enter a number!", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
            t.show();
        }

    }
  }

  AlertDialog d = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
  Button b = d.getButton(DialogInterface.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
  b.setOnClickListener(new mocl((d)));
}

Such fun!

This code will work for you, because i had a simmilar problem and this worked for me. :)

1- Override Onstart() method in your fragment-dialog class.

@Override
public void onStart() {
    super.onStart();
    final AlertDialog D = (AlertDialog) getDialog();
    if (D != null) {
        Button positive = (Button) D.getButton(Dialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
        positive.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View arg0) {
                if (edittext.equals("")) {
   Toast.makeText(getActivity(), "EditText empty",Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                } else {
                D.dismiss(); //dissmiss dialog
                }
            }
        });
    }
}

For ProgressDialogs

To prevent the dialog from being dismissed automatically you have to set the OnClickListener after the ProgressDialog is shown, like so:

connectingDialog = new ProgressDialog(this);

connectingDialog.setCancelable(false);
connectingDialog.setCanceledOnTouchOutside(false);

// Create the button but set the listener to a null object.
connectingDialog.setButton(DialogInterface.BUTTON_NEGATIVE, "Cancel", 
        (DialogInterface.OnClickListener) null )

// Show the dialog so we can then get the button from the view.
connectingDialog.show();

// Get the button from the view.
Button dialogButton = connectingDialog.getButton( DialogInterface.BUTTON_NEGATIVE);

// Set the onClickListener here, in the view.
dialogButton.setOnClickListener( new View.OnClickListener() {

    @Override
    public void onClick ( View v ) {

        // Dialog will not get dismissed until you call dismiss() explicitly.

    }

});
public class ComentarDialog extends DialogFragment{
private EditText comentario;

@Override
public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

    AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());

    LayoutInflater inflater = LayoutInflater.from(getActivity());
    View v = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_comentar, null);
    comentario = (EditText)v.findViewById(R.id.etxt_comentar_dialog);

    builder.setTitle("Comentar")
           .setView(v)
           .setPositiveButton("OK", null)
           .setNegativeButton("CANCELAR", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
               public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {

               }
           });

    return builder.create();
}

@Override
public void onStart() {
    super.onStart();

    //Obtenemos el AlertDialog
    AlertDialog dialog = (AlertDialog)getDialog();

    dialog.setCanceledOnTouchOutside(false);
    dialog.setCancelable(false);//Al presionar atras no desaparece

    //Implementamos el listener del boton OK para mostrar el toast
    dialog.getButton(AlertDialog.BUTTON_POSITIVE).setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            if(TextUtils.isEmpty(comentario.getText())){
               Toast.makeText(getActivity(), "Ingrese un comentario", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
               return;
            }
            else{
                ((AlertDialog)getDialog()).dismiss();
            }
        }
    });

    //Personalizamos
    Resources res = getResources();

    //Buttons
    Button positive_button = dialog.getButton(DialogInterface.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
    positive_button.setBackground(res.getDrawable(R.drawable.btn_selector_dialog));

    Button negative_button =  dialog.getButton(DialogInterface.BUTTON_NEGATIVE);
    negative_button.setBackground(res.getDrawable(R.drawable.btn_selector_dialog));

    int color = Color.parseColor("#304f5a");

    //Title
    int titleId = res.getIdentifier("alertTitle", "id", "android");
    View title = dialog.findViewById(titleId);
    if (title != null) {
        ((TextView) title).setTextColor(color);
    }

    //Title divider
    int titleDividerId = res.getIdentifier("titleDivider", "id", "android");
    View titleDivider = dialog.findViewById(titleDividerId);
    if (titleDivider != null) {
        titleDivider.setBackgroundColor(res.getColor(R.color.list_menu_divider));
    }
}
}

you can add builder.show(); after validation message before return;

like this

    public void login()
{
    final AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(this);
    builder.setView(R.layout.login_layout);
    builder.setTitle("Login");



    builder.setNegativeButton("Cancel", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
    {
        @Override
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id)
        {
            dialog.cancel();
        }
    });// put the negative button before the positive button, so it will appear

    builder.setPositiveButton("Ok", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
    {
        @Override
        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id)
        {
            Dialog d = (Dialog) dialog;
            final EditText etUserName = (EditText) d.findViewById(R.id.etLoginName);
            final EditText etPassword = (EditText) d.findViewById(R.id.etLoginPassword);
            String userName = etUserName.getText().toString().trim();
            String password = etPassword.getText().toString().trim();

            if (userName.isEmpty() || password.isEmpty())
            {

                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(),
                        "Please Fill all fields", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                builder.show();// here after validation message before retrun
                               //  it will reopen the dialog
                              // till the user enter the right condition
                return;
            }

            user = Manager.get(getApplicationContext()).getUserByName(userName);

            if (user == null)
            {
                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(),
                        "Error ethier username or password are wrong", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                builder.show();
                return;
            }
            if (password.equals(user.getPassword()))
            {
                etPassword.setText("");
                etUserName.setText("");
                setLogged(1);
                setLoggedId(user.getUserId());
                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(),
                        "Successfully logged in", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
               dialog.dismiss();// if every thing is ok then dismiss the dialog
            }
            else
            {
                Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(),
                        "Error ethier username or password are wrong", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
                builder.show();
                return;
            }

        }
    });

    builder.show();

}

If you are using material design I would suggest checking out material-dialogs. It fixed several issues for me related to currently open Android bugs (see 78088), but most importantly for this ticket it has an autoDismiss flag that can be set when using the Builder.

This is probably very late reply, but using setCancelable will do the trick.

alertDial.setCancelable(false);
  • 1
    Works fine for me. Makes me wonder what the mess below is about... – Glenn Maynard Feb 29 '16 at 22:32
  • 8
    From the docs: "Sets whether this dialog is cancelable with the BACK key." This has nothing to do with the positive button dismissing the dialog .. – clauziere Apr 12 '16 at 15:51
  • 3
    Doesn't work for me, still dismissing when clicking positive button – Hugo Aug 19 '16 at 12:04
  • 1
    This has nothing to do with the OP – MatPag Apr 12 '17 at 15:01
  • Does not address question – Kevin Crain Sep 27 at 0:46

It could be built with easiest way:

Alert Dialog with Custom View and with two Buttons (Positive & Negative).

AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity()).setTitle(getString(R.string.select_period));
builder.setPositiveButton(getString(R.string.ok), null);

 builder.setNegativeButton(getString(R.string.cancel), new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

    // Click of Cancel Button

   }
 });

  LayoutInflater li = LayoutInflater.from(getActivity());
  View promptsView = li.inflate(R.layout.dialog_date_picker, null, false);
  builder.setView(promptsView);

  DatePicker startDatePicker = (DatePicker)promptsView.findViewById(R.id.startDatePicker);
  DatePicker endDatePicker = (DatePicker)promptsView.findViewById(R.id.endDatePicker);

  final AlertDialog alertDialog = builder.create();
  alertDialog.show();

  Button theButton = alertDialog.getButton(DialogInterface.BUTTON_POSITIVE);
  theButton.setOnClickListener(new CustomListener(alertDialog, startDatePicker, endDatePicker));

CustomClickLister of Positive Button of Alert Dailog:

private class CustomListener implements View.OnClickListener {
        private final Dialog dialog;
        private DatePicker mStartDp, mEndDp;
    public CustomListener(Dialog dialog, DatePicker dS, DatePicker dE) {
        this.dialog = dialog;
        mStartDp = dS;
        mEndDp = dE;
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {

        int day1  = mStartDp.getDayOfMonth();
        int month1= mStartDp.getMonth();
        int year1 = mStartDp.getYear();
        Calendar cal1 = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal1.set(Calendar.YEAR, year1);
        cal1.set(Calendar.MONTH, month1);
        cal1.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, day1);


        int day2  = mEndDp.getDayOfMonth();
        int month2= mEndDp.getMonth();
        int year2 = mEndDp.getYear();
        Calendar cal2 = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal2.set(Calendar.YEAR, year2);
        cal2.set(Calendar.MONTH, month2);
        cal2.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, day2);

        if(cal2.getTimeInMillis()>=cal1.getTimeInMillis()){
            dialog.dismiss();
            Log.i("Dialog", "Dismiss");
            // Condition is satisfied so do dialog dismiss
            }else {
            Log.i("Dialog", "Do not Dismiss");
            // Condition is not satisfied so do not dialog dismiss
        }

    }
}

Done

My solution is simple, just use a custom layout for your DialogFragment and add a LinearLayout under your content which can be styled as borderless to match Google Material Design, then find the newly created Buttons and Override their OnClickListener: DialogFragment.java code:

    public class AddTopicFragment extends DialogFragment {
    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        final AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
        // Get the layout inflater
        LayoutInflater inflater = getActivity().getLayoutInflater();
        final View dialogView = inflater.inflate(R.layout.dialog_add_topic, null);

        Button saveTopicDialogButton = (Button) dialogView.findViewById(R.id.saveTopicDialogButton);
        Button cancelSaveTopicDialogButton = (Button) dialogView.findViewById(R.id.cancelSaveTopicDialogButton);

        final AppCompatEditText addTopicNameET = (AppCompatEditText) dialogView.findViewById(R.id.addTopicNameET);
        final AppCompatEditText addTopicCreatedByET = (AppCompatEditText) dialogView.findViewById(R.id.addTopicCreatedByET);

        saveTopicDialogButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                // validate inputs
                if(addTopicNameET.getText().toString().trim().isEmpty()){
                    addTopicNameET.setError("Topic name can't be empty");
                    addTopicNameET.requestFocus();
                }else if(addTopicCreatedByET.getText().toString().trim().isEmpty()){
                    addTopicCreatedByET.setError("Topic created by can't be empty");
                    addTopicCreatedByET.requestFocus();
                }else {
                    // save topic to database
                    Topic topic = new Topic();
                    topic.name = addTopicNameET.getText().toString().trim();
                    topic.createdBy = addTopicCreatedByET.getText().toString().trim();
                    topic.createdDate = new Date().getTime();
                    topic.save();
                    AddTopicFragment.this.dismiss();
                }
            }
        });
        cancelSaveTopicDialogButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                AddTopicFragment.this.dismiss();
            }
        });
        // Inflate and set the layout for the dialog
        // Pass null as the parent view because its going in the dialog layout
        builder.setView(dialogView)
                .setMessage(getString(R.string.add_topic_message));
        return builder.create();
    }


}

dialog_add_topic.xml

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:padding="@dimen/activity_horizontal_margin"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent">

    <android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        app:errorEnabled="true">

        <android.support.v7.widget.AppCompatEditText
            android:id="@+id/addTopicNameET"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:hint="Topic Name"
            android:inputType="textPersonName"
            android:maxLines="1" />

    </android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout>

    <android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        app:errorEnabled="true">

        <android.support.v7.widget.AppCompatEditText
            android:id="@+id/addTopicCreatedByET"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:hint="Created By"
            android:inputType="textPersonName"
            android:maxLines="1" />

    </android.support.design.widget.TextInputLayout>

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:orientation="horizontal">
        <Button
            android:text="@string/cancel"
            android:layout_weight="1"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:id="@+id/cancelSaveTopicDialogButton"
            style="@style/Widget.AppCompat.Button.ButtonBar.AlertDialog" />

        <Button
            android:text="@string/save"
            android:layout_weight="1"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:id="@+id/saveTopicDialogButton"
            style="@style/Widget.AppCompat.Button.ButtonBar.AlertDialog" />

    </LinearLayout>


</LinearLayout>

This is the final result:

To prevent Dialog box from closing when clicked and it should only close when internet is available

I am trying to do the same thing, as I don't want the dialog box to be closed until and unless the internet is connected.

Here is my code

AlertDialog.Builder builder=new AlertDialog.Builder(MainActivity.this); builder.setTitle("Internet Not Connected");
    if(ifConnected()){

        Toast.makeText(this, "Connected or not", Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
    }
    else{
        builder.setPositiveButton("Retry", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialogInterface, int i) {
               if(!ifConnected())
               {
                   builder.show();
               }
            }
        }).setNegativeButton("Cancel", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialogInterface, int i) {
                finish();
            }
        });
        builder.show();

    }

And here is my Connectivity manager code

 private boolean ifConnected()
{
    ConnectivityManager connectivityManager= (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    NetworkInfo networkInfo=connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();
   return networkInfo!=null && networkInfo.isConnected();
}
  • This is clever, but I get this error message : The specified child already has a parent. You must call removeView() on the child's parent first – Dan Chaltiel Aug 5 at 15:45

Put this in your Utility class.

/*
     * Show Dialog with Title, Message, Button1, Button2 with Button1 and Button2 Listener
     */
    public AlertDialog showDialog(Context ctx, String title, String msg,
                                  String btn1, String btn2,
                                  OnClickListener listener1,
                                  OnClickListener listener2) {

        AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(ctx)
                .setTitle(title)
                .setMessage(msg)
                .setCancelable(true)
                .setPositiveButton(btn1, listener1);
        if (btn2 != null)
            builder.setNegativeButton(btn2, listener2);

        AlertDialog alert = builder.create();
        return alert;
    }

Then when you need to show dialog

showDialog(getActivity(), "Title", "Message", "First button title", "Second button title",
                    new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                        @Override
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                            dialog.dismiss();
                            // TODO: 5/14/2018 first button clicked 
                        }
                    },
                    new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                        @Override
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                            dialog.dismiss();
                            // TODO: 5/14/2018 second button clicked
                        }
                    }).show();

protected by Nilesh Rathod May 24 at 10:01

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