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To be clear: I do mostly embedded stuff, i.e. it's C and some kind of real-time kernel in microcontroller; but actually this question should be platform-independent.

I've read nice article by Michael Barr: Mutexes and Semaphores Demystified, as well as this related answer on StackOverflow. I understand clearly what binary semaphore is for, and what mutex is for. That's great.

But to be honest I never knew, and still can't understand, what so-called counting semaphore (i.e. semaphore with max count > 1) is for. In what cases should I use it?

Long time ago, before I've read aforementioned article by Michael Barr, I've told something like "you can use it when you have, like, a hotel room with certain number of beds. The number of beds is a maximum count for the semaphore, just like a number of keys for that room".

It probably sounds nicely, but actually I never had such a situation in my programming practice (and can't imagine any), and Michael Barr said this approach is just wrong, and he seems right.

Then, after I've read the article, I supposed it might probably be used when I have, say, some kind of FIFO buffer. Assume the buffer's capacity is 10 elements, and we have two tasks: A (the producer), and B (the consumer). Then:

  • Semaphore's max count should be set to 10;
  • When A wants to put data into buffer, it signals the semaphore.
  • When B wants to get the data from buffer, it waits the semaphore.

Well, but it doesn't work:

  • What if A tries to put new data to the FIFO, but there is no room? How would it wait for the place: should it call signal before putting new data (and signal then should be able to wait until max count < max count)? If so, semaphore will be signaled before data is actually put in the FIFO, this is wrong.
  • Semaphore is not enough for the proper synchronization: the FIFO itself needs to be synchronized as well. And then, it produces classic TOCTTOU problem: there is a period of time while semaphore is already either signaled or waited, but FIFO isn't yet modified.

So, when should I use that beast, the counting semaphore?

6

The 'classic' example is, indeed, a producer-consumer queue.

An unbounded queue requires one semaphore, (to count the queue entries), and a mutex-protected thread-safe queue, (or equivalent lock-free thread-safe queue). The semaphore is intialized to zero. Producers lock the mutex, push an object onto the queue, unlock the mutex and signal the semaphore. Consumers wait on the semaphore, lock the mutex, pop the object and unlock the mutex.

An bounded queue requires two semaphores, (one 'count' to count the entries, the other 'available' to count the free space), and a mutex-protected thread-safe queue, (or equivalent lock-free thread-safe queue). 'count' is initialized to zero and 'available' to the number of spaces free in an empty queue. Producers wait for 'available', lock the mutex, push an object onto the queue, unlock the mutex and signal 'count'. Consumers wait on 'count', lock the mutex, pop the object, unlock the mutex and signal 'available'.

This is a classic use for semaphores and had been around since forever, (well, since Dijkstra, anyway:). It's been tried billions of times, and it works fine for any number of producers/consumers.

There is no TOCTTOU issue, no corner-cases, no races.

The 'mutex' functionality may be provided by yet another semaphore, initialized to 1. This allows 'two semaphore' unbounded, and 'three semaphore' bounded implementations.

  • Well, there is a time between the moment when producer P1 finished waiting for 'available' and locked the mutex; so, there might be some other producer P2 interrupted that sequence (and lock mutex first). Then, P1 locks the mutex, but the queue is full already, P1 has to unlock mutex and go to wait for 'available' again. Is this actually good? And Wow!, three objects for just a single data queue. The real-time kernel that I use (TNeoKernel: bitbucket.org/dfrank/tneokernel ) offers the data queue that provides atomic wait-and-put-data as well as atomic wait-and-get-data operations. – Dmitry Frank Oct 7 '14 at 8:56
  • Well, there is a time between the moment when producer P1 finished waiting for 'available' and locked the mutex; so, there might be some other producer P2 interrupted that sequence (and lock mutex first)' in that scenario, there must be TWO spaces free on the queue because the two threads have both obtained a unit from the 'available' semaphore, so both threads can push their objects without overflowing the queue. The real-time kernel that you suggest - it allows a blocking, bounded queue with any number of producers/consumers? – Martin James Oct 8 '14 at 2:32
  • Also, you could substitute any kind of 'lockfree' queue for the 'simple queue and mutex'. As long as the lockfree queue class is unconditionally safe for multiple producers and consumers. – Martin James Oct 8 '14 at 2:37
  • "there must be TWO spaces free on the queue because the two threads have both obtained a unit from the 'available' semaphore" - oh my bad, thanks, you're right. The real-time kernel I suggested (tneokernel) - yes, it allows a blocking, bounded queue with any number of producers/consumers, here are docs: dfrank.bitbucket.org/tneokernel_api/dev/html/tn__dqueue_8h.html . There are two doubly-linked lists: one for producers, another one for consumers. Each list could contain any number of elements. – Dmitry Frank Oct 8 '14 at 7:21
  • Rendezvous synchronization seems to be another good use case. – Peter Tröger Jun 29 '16 at 14:42
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I supposed it might probably be used when I have, say, some kind of FIFO buffer. Assume the buffer's capacity is 10 elements, and we have two tasks: A (the producer), and B (the consumer). Then:

  • Semaphore's max count should be set to 10;
  • When A wants to put data into buffer, it signals the semaphore.
  • When B wants to get the data from buffer, it waits the semaphore.

This is not the way semaphores are used in the producer-consumer scenario. The standard solution is to use two counting semaphores, one for the empty slots (initialized to the number of available slots), and another for the filled slots (initialized to 0).

Producers try to allocate empty slots to put items in, so they start with wait-ing on the semaphore assigned to the empty slots. Consumers try to "allocate" (get hold of) filled slots, so they start with wait-ing on the semaphore assigned to the filled slots.

After finishing their work, they both signal the other semaphore since they transform slots from empty to filled and from filled to empty, respectively.

Standard solution scheme:

semaphore mutex  = 1;
semaphore filled = 0;
semaphore empty  = SIZE;

producer() {
    while ( true) {
        item = produceItem();
        wait(empty);

        wait(mutex);
        putItemIntoBuffer( item);
        signal(mutex);

        signal(filled);
    }
}

consumer() {
    while ( true) {
        wait( filled);

        wait( mutex);
        item = removeItemFromBuffer();
        signal( mutex);

        signal( empty);
        consumeItem( item);
    }
}

I think counting semaphores serve well in this situation.


Another, maybe simpler, example could be using a counting semaphore for avoiding deadlock in the Dining philosophers scenario. Since deadlock can occur only when all philosophers sit down simultaneously and pick their (say) left fork, deadlock can be avoided by not allowing all of them into the dining room at the same time. This can be achieved by a counting semaphore (enter) initialized to one less than the number of philosophers.

The protocol of one philosopher then becomes:

wait( enter)

wait( left_fork)
wait( right_fork)
eat()
signal( left_fork)
signal( right_fork)

signal( enter)

This ensures that all philosophers cannot be in the dining room at the same time.

0

Some of the more popular use cases of counting semaphores are -

  • Limiting the number of connections in a JDBC connection pool.
  • Network connection throttling.
  • Limiting concurrent access to resources such as a disk.

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