7

Please take a look at this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jpftqc26/

A CSS gradient, starts black from left, turns into red, then back to black again. Really simple.

Is there any way I can make the red part 500px wide and the black parts fill the screen, whatever the resolution? With red in the middle, just like in the fiddle.

Is there a way do define a width in pixels, between color stops, in a CSS gradient?

Code:

.test_gradient {
background: 
linear-gradient(
      to right, 
      #000000,
      #000000 20%,
      #ff0000 20%,
      #ff0000 80%,
      #000000 80%
    );
2
  • 1
    Is there a reason for it to have gradient?
    – buhbang
    Oct 6 '14 at 18:38
  • remember calc function. Do you do ... #ff0000 calc(20% + 10px), ...
    – Gqqnbig
    Apr 26 '17 at 0:05
9

Yes. you can do this with hard pixels points and the use of the calc function. Just set them as such:

http://jsfiddle.net/jpftqc26/9/

CSS:

.test_gradient {
background: 
linear-gradient(
      to right, 
      #000000 0px, /* Starting point */
      #000000 calc(50% - 250px), /* End black point */
      #ff0000 calc(50% - 250px), /* Starting red point */
      #ff0000 calc(50% + 250px), /* End red point */
      #000000 calc(50% + 250px), /* Starting black point */
      #000000 100% /* End black point */
    );
2
  • 1
    Phlume, amazing idea! Resolution independent. Will check browser support for calc and will be back with an accepted answer in a few hours!
    – Malasorte
    Oct 6 '14 at 19:08
  • may need to vendor prefix it, asit is emerging css so use with caution. Some dev notes about it are here: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/calc
    – Phlume
    Oct 6 '14 at 19:10
4

Another way to do it, without using calc(), is to use 2 different gradients

.test_gradient {
background-image: 
linear-gradient( to left,  #ff0000 0px,  #ff0000 250px,  #000000 100px), linear-gradient( to right,   red 0px,  #ff0000 250px,  #000000 100px);

background-size: 50.1% 1000px;
background-position: top left, top right;
background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

One goes to the right, the other to the left, and each one has half the total width

fiddle

1

At the moment I can't think of how to do it with only CSS gradients and a single element.

Given your example, and assuming an extra div is ok, then here's an alternative approach without gradients (http://jsfiddle.net/jpftqc26/2/):

HTML

<body class="background">
    <div class="foreground"/>
</body>

CSS

html, body {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}

.background {
    background-color: #000000;
}
.foreground {
    background-color: #ff0000;
    width: 100%;
    max-width: 500px;
    height: 100%;
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
}

This produces the same effect, uses one additional element, and provides a red foreground that will grow to a max of 500px wide--beyond that it is all black on both sides. If you want the red to always be 500px wide then just remove the max-width rule and change width to 500px.

0

I think that the best solution, without adding any html element, is to use an image as background:

.test_gradient {
    background: url('http://s14.postimg.org/zf0kd84lt/redline.jpg') repeat-y #000 center top;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/Monteduro/jpftqc26/3/

2
  • 2
    If you're going to use an image you may as well embed it to avoid the extra request -- jsfiddle.net/jpftqc26/7 .test_gradient { background: url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAAAEAAAABCAIAAACQd1PeAAAADElEQVQI12P4z8AAAAMBAQAY3Y2wAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC) repeat-y #000 center top; background-size: 500px; }
    – STW
    Oct 6 '14 at 18:50
  • op specifically asks for a gradient in css
    – Phlume
    Oct 6 '14 at 19:02
0

If you want that black part was flexible and red part was fixed you could use something like this:

html{height:100%;}
.test_gradient {
    background: #000000;
    position:relative;
    margin:0;
    height:100%;
}
.test_gradient:after{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    height:100%;
    width:500px;
    left:50%;
    margin-left:-250px;
    background:#f00;
}

DEMO

5
  • 1
    I think must is the wrong word here. Clearly could would be a better choice as there is definitely more than one solution.
    – Phlume
    Oct 6 '14 at 19:06
  • Thank you!! Will do some tests!
    – Malasorte
    Oct 6 '14 at 19:09
  • @Phlume, sry, my english is bad
    – Anon
    Oct 6 '14 at 19:11
  • no worries. It's a working solution, just a comment on the restrictive "must". Some beginner users may find that as the ultimate solution and cease looking for new ways to resolve the issue.
    – Phlume
    Oct 6 '14 at 19:13
  • Changed this to the accepted answer, after much testing in a complex webpage. Using calc generates minor problems, this is a better solution.
    – Malasorte
    Oct 7 '14 at 17:13

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