I have a swift framework that defines a struct:

public struct CollectionTO {
    var index: Order
    var title: String
    var description: String
}

However, I can't seem to use the implicit member wise initializer from another project that imports the library. The error is 'CollectionTO' cannot be initialised because it has no accessible initialisers. i.e. it's not giving the default implicit member wise initialiser the public keyword.

var collection1 = CollectionTO(index: 1, title: "New Releases", description: "All the new releases")

I'm having to add my own init method like so:

public struct CollectionTO {
    var index: Order
    var title: String
    var description: String

    public init(index: Order, title: String, description: String) {
        self.index = index;
        self.title = title;
        self.description = description;
    }

}

... but i'd rather not if there is another way anyone knows?

up vote 158 down vote accepted

I read the manual:

"Default Memberwise Initializers for Structure Types The default memberwise initializer for a structure type is considered private if any of the structure’s stored properties are private. Otherwise, the initializer has an access level of internal.

As with the default initializer above, if you want a public structure type to be initializable with a memberwise initializer when used in another module, you must provide a public memberwise initializer yourself as part of the type’s definition."

Excerpt from "The Swift Programming Language", section "Access Control".

  • 124
    Well, that's annoying. :( – Dan Loewenherz Mar 25 '16 at 19:14
  • 4
    [github.com/apple/swift-evolution/blob/master/proposals/… says: “Quoting Chris Lattner: The default memberwise initializer behavior of Swift has at least these deficiencies (IMO): 2) Access control + the memberwise init often requires you to implement it yourself”. So maybe it is just a deficiency which exists for no reason in particular. Couldn’t find more references about this. – Jano May 3 '16 at 10:04
  • 8
    @DanLoewenherz Yes it's inconvenient. The rationale is: “A public type defaults to having internal members, not public members. If you want a type member to be public, you must explicitly mark it as such. This requirement ensures that the public-facing API for a type is something you opt in to publishing, and avoids presenting the internal workings of a type as public API by mistake.” Excerpt From: Apple Inc. “The Swift Programming Language.” iBooks. itun.es/gb/jEUH0.l – bandejapaisa Sep 22 '16 at 15:33
  • 9
    A compiler directive would be nice to override the default behaviour, and make it public. – bandejapaisa Jan 31 '17 at 13:04
  • 2
    Internal is a terrible choice for a default, imo. It basically guarantees that you will run into unexpected problems when referencing a module externally for the first time. Why not default everything to private, so that we can tell immediately when something is not given the correct access level and then decide if it should be public or internal? – devios1 Dec 14 '17 at 15:13

Until Apple change this and make it less annoying, u can use https://github.com/Bouke/SwiftInitializerGenerator (or any other) this thing for public initializers creation. So it will be less work. Tried it and it works. Xcode Version 10.0, High Sierra 10.13.6

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