How can I use CRTP in C++ to avoid the overhead of virtual member functions?

There are two ways.

The first one is by specifying the interface statically for the structure of types:

template <class Derived>
struct base {
  void foo() {
    static_cast<Derived *>(this)->foo();
  };
};

struct my_type : base<my_type> {
  void foo(); // required to compile.
};

struct your_type : base<your_type> {
  void foo(); // required to compile.
};

The second one is by avoiding the use of the reference-to-base or pointer-to-base idiom and do the wiring at compile-time. Using the above definition, you can have template functions that look like these:

template <class T> // T is deduced at compile-time
void bar(base<T> & obj) {
  obj.foo(); // will do static dispatch
}

struct not_derived_from_base { }; // notice, not derived from base

// ...
my_type my_instance;
your_type your_instance;
not_derived_from_base invalid_instance;
bar(my_instance); // will call my_instance.foo()
bar(your_instance); // will call your_instance.foo()
bar(invalid_instance); // compile error, cannot deduce correct overload

So combining the structure/interface definition and the compile-time type deduction in your functions allows you to do static dispatch instead of dynamic dispatch. This is the essence of static polymorphism.

  • 14
    Excellent answer – Eli Bendersky May 4 '11 at 12:51
  • 3
    I'd like to emphasise that not_derived_from_base is not derived from base, nor is it derived from base... – leftaroundabout Feb 24 '12 at 12:27
  • 3
    Actually, the declaration of foo() inside my_type/your_type is not required. codepad.org/ylpEm1up (Causes stack overflow) -- Is there a way to enforce a definition of foo at compile time? -- Ok, found a solution: ideone.com/C6Oz9 -- Maybe you want to correct that in your answer. – cooky451 Mar 3 '12 at 18:35
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    Could you explain to me what is the motivation to use CRTP in this example? If bar would be defined as template<class T> void bar(T& obj) { obj.foo(); }, then any class that provides foo would be fine. So based on your example it looks like the sole use of CRTP is to specify the interface at compile time. Is that what is it for? – Anton Daneyko Apr 16 '13 at 17:27
  • 1
    @Dean Michael Indeed the code in the example compiles even if foo is not defined in the my_type and your_type. Without those overrides the base::foo is recursively called (and stackoverflows). So maybe you want to correct you answer as cooky451 showed? – Anton Daneyko Apr 16 '13 at 17:37

I've been looking for decent discussions of CRTP myself. Todd Veldhuizen's Techniques for Scientific C++ is a great resource for this (1.3) and many other advanced techniques like expression templates.

Also, I found that you could read most of Coplien's original C++ Gems article at Google books. Maybe that's still the case.

  • @fizzer I have read the part you suggest, but still do not understand what does the template<class T_leaftype> double sum(Matrix<T_leaftype>& A); buys you in comparison to template<class Whatever> double sum(Whatever& A); – Anton Daneyko Apr 16 '13 at 17:45
  • @AntonDaneyko When called on a base instance, the sum of the base class is called, e.g. "area of a shape" with default implementation as if it were a square. The goal of CRTP in this case is to resolve the most-derived implementation, "area of a trapezoid" etc. while still being able to refer to the trapezoid as a shape until derived behavior is required. Basically, whenever you would normally need dynamic_cast or virtual methods. – John P Oct 22 '17 at 18:44

I had to look up CRTP. Having done that, however, I found some stuff about Static Polymorphism. I suspect that this is the answer to your question.

It turns out that ATL uses this pattern quite extensively.

This Wikipedia answer has all you need. Namely:

template <class Derived> struct Base
{
    void interface()
    {
        // ...
        static_cast<Derived*>(this)->implementation();
        // ...
    }

    static void static_func()
    {
        // ...
        Derived::static_sub_func();
        // ...
    }
};

struct Derived : Base<Derived>
{
    void implementation();
    static void static_sub_func();
};

Although I don't know how much this actually buys you. The overhead of a virtual function call is (compiler dependent, of course):

  • Memory: One function pointer per virtual function
  • Runtime: One function pointer call

While the overhead of CRTP static polymorphism is:

  • Memory: Duplication of Base per template instantiation
  • Runtime: One function pointer call + whatever static_cast is doing
  • 4
    Actually, the duplication of Base per template instantiation is an illusion because (unless you still have a vtable) the compiler will merge the storage of the base and the derived into a single struct for you. The function pointer call is also optimized out by the compiler (the static_cast part). – Dean Michael Nov 4 '08 at 18:52
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    By the way, your analysis of CRTP is incorrect. It should be: Memory: Nothing, as Dean Michael said. Runtime: One (faster) static function call, not virtual, which is the whole point of the exercise. static_cast doesn't do anything, it just allows the code to compile. – Frederik Slijkerman Nov 5 '08 at 8:26
  • 2
    My point is that the base code will be duplicated in all template instances (the very merging you talk of). Akin to having a template with only one method that relies on the template parameter; everything else is better in a base class otherwise it is pulled in ('merged') multiple times. – user23167 Nov 5 '08 at 16:37
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    CRTP overhead claims are completely wrong, -1 – paulm Jun 21 '16 at 14:51
  • 1
    Each method in the base will be compiled again for each derived. In the (expected) case where each instantiated method is different (because of the properties of Derived being different), that can't necessarily be counted as overhead. But it can lead to larger overall code size, vs the situation where a complex method in the (normal) base class calls virtual methods of subclasses. Also, if you put utility methods in Base<Derived>, which don't actually depend at all on <Derived>, they will still get instantiated. Maybe global optimization will fix that somewhat. – greggo Nov 1 '16 at 17:39

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