3

I'm wondering something like this is possible:

// declaration
void func();

int main()
{
    int ar[] = { 1, 2, 3 };
    func(ar); // call with parameter
    return 1;
}

void func() // no parameters
{
    // do something
}

Can someone explain me this and especially how can I access ar in func()?

4
  • This program will not compile. Oct 7, 2014 at 8:42
  • 5
    @mahendiran.b your compiler is broken then
    – M.M
    Oct 7, 2014 at 8:44
  • @mahendiran.b this program compile!
    – leon22
    Oct 7, 2014 at 9:02
  • thanks @leon22. Generally if the function is not taking any arguments means void will be used. But in your case in func declaration, the argument stands nothing. So it not giving compilation error. In my 1st read i dint check the declaration statement properly, so I given wrong comment. Oct 7, 2014 at 9:06

6 Answers 6

10

In C (not C++), a function declared as func() is treated as having an unspecified number of untyped parameters. A function with no parameters should be explicitly declared as func(void).

4
  • even this signature func(void) is also getting invoked. i just can't believe it.
    – Rustam
    Oct 7, 2014 at 8:55
  • @Rustam Just tried and it did not compile (gcc 4.8.2, without any flags, just -o): error: too many arguments to function ‘func’
    – zegkljan
    Oct 7, 2014 at 8:59
  • @Rustam But your definition differs from the declaration: func() vs func(void). The compiler looks at the declaration. See: ideone.com/Ah9XbE :)
    – zegkljan
    Oct 7, 2014 at 9:05
  • This leaves me wondering why func(void) is not equivalent to func(). What is the purpose of being able to call functions with arguments that they cannot access?
    – Kröw
    May 13 at 6:42
3

A hack would be to exploit the GCC calling convention.

For x86, parameters are pushed into stack. Local variables are also in the stack.

So

void func()
{
   int local_var;
   int *ar;
   uintptr_t *ptr = &local_var;
   ptr += sizeof(int *);
   ar = (int *)ptr;

May give you the array address in ar in x86.

For x86_64, the first parameter is stored in rdi register.

void func()
{ 
    uintptr_t *ptr;
    int *ar;
    asm (
    "movq %%rdi, %0"   
    :"=r"(*ptr)
    :
    :"rdi");
    ar = (int *)ptr;

May give you the array address in ar in x86_64.

I have not tested these code myself and you may be to fine tune the offsets yourself.

But I am just showing one possible hack.

3
  • 1
    Nice approach! I will have a look! ;-)
    – leon22
    Oct 7, 2014 at 12:59
  • 1
    I have updated the code for x86. Let me also know, if the hack really works! Oct 7, 2014 at 13:47
  • 1
    asm code produce segfault, but works replacing ':"=r"(*ptr)' with ':"=r"(ptr)'
    – mpromonet
    Nov 23, 2014 at 10:23
1

If you want to use any function with no parameters with any return type, it should be declared as (In C)

return_type func(void). It is only generic way of function declaration.

But any how, for your question , it possible to access but not generic..Try this program...

  #include<stdio.h>
  int *p;

  void func();

  int main()
  {
    int ar[] = { 1, 2, 3 };
    p=ar;
    printf("In main %d\n",ar[0]);
    func(ar); // call with parameter
    printf("In main %d\n",ar[0]);
   return 1;
 }

 void func() // no parameters
 {
  printf("In func %d \n",*p);
    *p=20;
 }

Even this program works fine, it is not generic way and also is undefined.

if you declare function like void func (void) ,it will not work.

0

You can't access ar in func(), since you dont have a reference to it in func().

It would be possible if ar would be a global var or you have a pointer on it.

0

So that you can do something with func(), you need to pass it the input data you'll work with.

First you must declare the function properly :

// declaration
 void func(int []);

The define it :

void func( int a[] )
{
   // do something
   printf ("a[0] = %d\n", a[0]);
}

Full code :

#include <stdio.h>

// declaration
 void func(int []);

int main()
{
   int ar[] = { 1, 2, 3 };
   func(ar); // call with parameter
   return 1;
}

void func( int a[] )
{
   // do something
   printf ("a[0] = %d\n", a[0]);
}

This will display : a[0] = 1

2
  • This is not the question that speaks about difference between declaration and usage.
    – mpromonet
    Nov 23, 2014 at 10:07
  • @mpromonet1 : you're right, I overlooked the question. Understood he didn't know how to use his function.
    – SCO
    Nov 23, 2014 at 11:39
-1

You can implement something like this.

void func(int *p, int n);

int main()
{
    int ar[] = { 1, 2, 3 };
    func(ar, sizeof (ar)/sizeof(ar[0]) ); // call with parameter
    return 1;
}

void func(int *p, int n) // added 2 parameters
{
    int i=0;

    for (i=0; i<n; ++i){
        printf ("%d ", p[i]);
        }

}
1
  • 1
    This is not the question that speaks about difference between declaration and usage.
    – mpromonet
    Nov 23, 2014 at 10:08

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