125

Quick add on requirement in our project. A field in our DB to hold a phone number is set to only allow 10 characters. So, if I get passed "(913)-444-5555" or anything else, is there a quick way to run a string through some kind of special replace function that I can pass it a set of characters to allow?

Regex?

251

Definitely regex:

string CleanPhone(string phone)
{
    Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");   
    return digitsOnly.Replace(phone, "");
}

or within a class to avoid re-creating the regex all the time:

private static Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");   

public static string CleanPhone(string phone)
{
    return digitsOnly.Replace(phone, "");
}

Depending on your real-world inputs, you may want some additional logic there to do things like strip out leading 1's (for long distance) or anything trailing an x or X (for extensions).

| improve this answer | |
  • That's perfect. This is only used a couple of times, so we don't need to create a class, and as far as the leading 1, not a bad idea. But I think I'd rather handle that on a case by case basis, at least in this project. Thanks again -- if I could upvote again, I would. – Matt Dawdy Nov 4 '08 at 17:01
  • 1
    I'm waiting for someone to post an extension method version of this for the string class :) – Joel Coehoorn Nov 4 '08 at 17:33
  • @Joel I added the extension method version below. Guess the comments don't support markdown. – Aaron Oct 21 '11 at 18:07
  • 13
    Note [^\d] can be simplified to \D – p.s.w.g Jul 15 '14 at 18:24
  • Combined this answer (caching the regex in the class) with the extension method one below :) – Vincent Vancalbergh Feb 9 '15 at 9:23
73

You can do it easily with regex:

string subject = "(913)-444-5555";
string result = Regex.Replace(subject, "[^0-9]", ""); // result = "9134445555"
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Upvoted for being a great answer, but Joel beat you out. Thanks for the answer though -- I really like to see confirmation from multiple sources. – Matt Dawdy Nov 4 '08 at 17:04
  • @JoSmo To be fair, Joel's can be converted to a one-liner pretty trivially. (But I also upvoted :D) – Mage Xy Mar 17 '16 at 18:27
40

You don't need to use Regex.

phone = new String(phone.Where(c => char.IsDigit(c)).ToArray())
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Nice Answer, why add more reference to RegularExpressions namespace – BTE Mar 17 '14 at 12:46
  • 1
    @BTE because it's a short-hand that's simply utilizing system.linq; – Eric Milliot-Martinez Dec 21 '15 at 19:07
  • 1
    How well does this perform compared with the Regex solution? – Shavais Dec 16 '16 at 1:58
  • 2
    Adding a test to @Max-PC's benchmark code for the LINQ solution results in -- StringBuilder: 273ms, Regex: 2096ms, LINQ: 658ms. Slower than StringBuilder but still significantly faster than Regex. Given that that is benchmarking 1,000,000 replacements, the effective difference between the StringBuilder and LINQ solutions for most scenarios is probably neglible. – Chris Pratt May 15 '18 at 23:45
  • @ChrisPratt for the regex, did you create a new regex each time, or re-use an existing one? That could have a big impact on performance. – carlin.scott Apr 27 at 17:19
23

Here's the extension method way of doing it.

public static class Extensions
{
    public static string ToDigitsOnly(this string input)
    {
        Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");
        return digitsOnly.Replace(input, "");
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
10

Using the Regex methods in .NET you should be able to match any non-numeric digit using \D, like so:

phoneNumber  = Regex.Replace(phoneNumber, "\\D", String.Empty);
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    This isn't quite right. You need a @ or "\\D" to escape the \ in the regex. Also, you should use String.Empty instead of "" – Bryan Aug 20 '12 at 19:34
5

How about an extension method that doesn't use regex.

If you do stick to one of the Regex options at least use RegexOptions.Compiled in the static variable.

public static string ToDigitsOnly(this string input)
{
    return new String(input.Where(char.IsDigit).ToArray());
}

This builds on Usman Zafar's answer converted to a method group.

| improve this answer | |
4

for the best performance and lower memory consumption , try this:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public class Program
{
    private static Regex digitsOnly = new Regex(@"[^\d]");

    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Init...");

        string phone = "001-12-34-56-78-90";

        var sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            DigitsOnly(phone);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Time: " + sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        var sw2 = new Stopwatch();
        sw2.Start();
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            DigitsOnlyRegex(phone);
        }
        sw2.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Time: " + sw2.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public static string DigitsOnly(string phone, string replace = null)
    {
        if (replace == null) replace = "";
        if (phone == null) return null;
        var result = new StringBuilder(phone.Length);
        foreach (char c in phone)
            if (c >= '0' && c <= '9')
                result.Append(c);
            else
            {
                result.Append(replace);
            }
        return result.ToString();
    }

    public static string DigitsOnlyRegex(string phone)
    {
        return digitsOnly.Replace(phone, "");
    }
}

The result in my computer is:
Init...
Time: 307
Time: 2178

| improve this answer | |
  • +1 for showing benchmarks. Interesting that the loop with StringBuilder outperforms RegEx, although I guess it makes sense when RegEx probably has to wade through a lot of rules to decide what to do. – Steve In CO Jul 13 '17 at 14:13
3

I'm sure there's a more efficient way to do it, but I would probably do this:

string getTenDigitNumber(string input)
{    
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i - 0; i < input.Length; i++)
    {
        int junk;
        if(int.TryParse(input[i], ref junk))
            sb.Append(input[i]);
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • That was my first instinct, and was also why I asked here. RegEx seems like a much better solution to me. But thanks for the answer! – Matt Dawdy Nov 4 '08 at 17:03
-1

try this

public static string cleanPhone(string inVal)
        {
            char[] newPhon = new char[inVal.Length];
            int i = 0;
            foreach (char c in inVal)
                if (c.CompareTo('0') > 0 && c.CompareTo('9') < 0)
                    newPhon[i++] = c;
            return newPhon.ToString();
        }
| improve this answer | |
  • return newPhone.ToString(); will return "System.Char[]". I think you meant return new string(newPhone);, But this also is filtering out the numbers 0 and 9 because of the > and < instead of >= and <=. But even then then string will have trailing spaces because the newPhon array is longer than it needs to be. – juharr Sep 2 '15 at 18:25

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