3

Hello I'm looking to build in CSS3 an image with round corners and a very light oval shape, like in this pic.

Not sure if it's possible and how. I know how to build a round image or an image with round corners, but this is a little different.

UPDATE Here is what I've done

.round{
    background-color:red;
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    border-top-left-radius: 45px 40px;
    border-top-right-radius: 45px 40px;
    border-bottom-left-radius: 45px 40px;
    border-bottom-right-radius: 45px 40px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/7t1z3hxf/9/

UPDATE2 Here are the schematics of what I'm trying to achieve enter image description here

enter image description here

Thanks

2
  • what have you tried? What's the extent of your current knowledge on rounded borders and such? I won't be the one closing it, but if you don't explain that you've at least done a minimal amount of research effort, this question WILL end up being closed, I can almost guarantee you – markasoftware Oct 7 '14 at 22:59
  • @Markasoftware I've updated the post. My problem is with the top and bottom , because I want them to be oval, and the left and right to be more straight – Doua Beri Oct 7 '14 at 23:31
4

If perfect precision is what you want, I recommend mask-image instead of border-radius. It's much better suited for what you want.

To use your Illustrator-built(?) shape as a mask in CSS, export it as SVG or PNG with transparent bg.

This will work in Chrome, Safari and Opera, but you need to use the prefixed -webkit-mask-image. The property is in progress of being merged with CSS mask-image which only applied to SVG, hence the current need for a prefix. For other browsers, you may choose the lesser precise border-radius.

.round{
 -webkit-mask-image: url(yourshape.png);
 -webkit-mask-size: contain;
 -webkit-mask-position: center center;
 /* ... border-radius as fallback */
}

Learn more about CSS Masking and browser support.

4

Adapted from Here

If it's note exactly what you are looking for, I can mess with the border radii and round it or flatten it.

#round {
  position: relative;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  margin: 20px 0;
  background: orange;
  border-radius: 48% / 25%;
  color: white;
}
#round:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 10%;
  bottom: 11%;
  right: -5%;
  left: -5%;
  background: inherit;
  border-radius: 21% / 68%;
}
<div id="round"></div>

3
  • I think that's the technique. It's similar to what I'm looking for, but not exactly. In my example the corners are a little more round and the I think the width is 110px(100px+ 2*5%) instead of 100px. I'm looking for something that can fit in a 100px square box. – Doua Beri Oct 8 '14 at 8:03
  • Also can you explain how did you set the round values, from a mathematical point of view – Doua Beri Oct 8 '14 at 8:04
  • Well you'll notice that this shape is composed of two separately rounded rectangles. The notation for border-radius is explained here. – Wold Oct 8 '14 at 16:01
0

If I understood right you want something like this.

HTML:

<DIV CLASS="TEST"></DIV>

CSS:

.TEST{
   width:230px;
   height:240px;
   background-image:url(IMAGE.JPG);
   border-radius:100px;
   background-position:center center;
   background-size::230px 240px;
 }

You may change the values to get the desired position.

2
  • close, but not exactly what I'm looking for. I've updated the main post with the schematics. – Doua Beri Oct 8 '14 at 0:28
  • Then,you will need css before & after to achieve this.I could do it but it's a little tricky.Something like those examples : css-tricks.com/examples/ShapesOfCSS – Stratos Asimis Oct 8 '14 at 1:23

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.