21

Suppose I have

Eigen::VectorXd x; //{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8}

and

Eigen::VectorXd ind_vec; //{0,2,4,5}

Is there a way an easy way to extract the ind_vec elements of x?

Something like:

x.extract(ind_vec) returning {1, 3, 5, 6}
2
  • Is there something easier than specifying the indices directly? You have the elements and their indices. What else do you want?
    – CroCo
    Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 21:57
  • Might be a good idea to use Eigen::VectorXi rather than Eigen::VectorXd for indices. Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 17:18

6 Answers 6

19

Since the current answer was not satisfactory for me, I googled a bit and I found this tutorial in the Eigen documentation.

#include <Eigen/Dense>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
  Eigen::ArrayXf v(6);
  v << 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6;
  cout << "v.head(3) =" << endl << v.head(3) << endl << endl;
  cout << "v.tail<3>() = " << endl << v.tail<3>() << endl << endl;
  v.segment(1,4) *= 2;
  cout << "after 'v.segment(1,4) *= 2', v =" << endl << v << endl;
}

Will output:

v.head(3) =
1
2
3

v.tail<3>() = 
4
5
6

after 'v.segment(1,4) *= 2', v =
 1
 4
 6
 8
10
 6

I haven't tested it with vectors, but I guess should be possible as well.

1
  • 6
    This works only for consecutive indices and doesn't answer the OP's question (Eigen::VectorXd ind_vec; //{0,2,4,5})
    – kingusiu
    Commented Apr 22, 2018 at 21:49
12

In C++ 11 (and up) do this:

 ind_vec.unaryExpr(x);

You can make use of unaryExpr(Functor) since we are taking an index array and applying a functor to each element of the array. The result type will have the same dimensions as the index array. For the functor, we need an object with an operator:

 Scalar operator() (Index index) const {
     return x[index];
 }

As it happens, Eigen::Matrix has just such an operator already. Here's a full example:

Eigen::VectorXd x(8);  x << 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 5.5, 6.6, 7.7, 8.8;
Eigen::Array4i ind_vec(0,2,4,5);

// result has dimensions as ind_vec matrix/array, and scalar type from x
Eigen::Array4d result = ind_vec.unaryExpr(x);

std::cout << "result^T = " << result.transpose() << std::endl;

// Output:
// result^T = 1.1 3.3 5.5 6.6

The only caveat is that this requires at least C++11 to work. The problem is that eigen internally relies upon std::result_of to get the scalar result type. Without that, you might get errors stating that a cast is required.

1
  • 1
    +1 since this is the closest answer to the OP's question. I only have a remark about the example code: in my case (running C++14) 'ind_vec' should be an array of double as well, otherwise 'result' would be filled with casted integer version of the entries in the input vector 'x' Commented Sep 6, 2021 at 20:01
7

This is now supported in Eigen 3.4 via slicing and indexing:

Eigen::VectorXd x(8); x<<1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8;
Eigen::VectorXi ind_vec(4); ind_vec<<0,2,4,5;

Eigen::VectorXd x_slice = x(ind_vec);

As the docs note, ind_vec can also be

an arbitrary list of row or column indices stored as either an ArrayXi, a std::vector, std::array<int,N>, etc.

5

Seems like it'd be easy to write yourself if it's just for vectors:

#include "Eigen/Core"

template <typename T, typename T2>
T extract(const T2& full, const T& ind)
{
    int num_indices = ind.innerSize();
    T target(num_indices);
    for (int i = 0; i < num_indices; i++)
    {
        target[i] = full[ind[i]];
    }
    return target;
}

int main()
{
    Eigen::VectorXd full(8); 
    full << 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8;
    Eigen::Vector4d ind_vec(4);
    ind_vec << 0, 2, 4, 5;
    std::cout << "full:" << full<< std::endl;
    std::cout << "ind_vec:" << ind_vec<< std::endl;
    std::cout << "extracted" << extract(full,ind_vec) << std::endl;
}

That should work for most cases

edit: for cases where your index scalar type is different than your source and target scalar type the following will work (for all build-in Eigen types).

template <typename T, typename T2>
Eigen::Matrix<typename T2::Scalar,T::RowsAtCompileTime,T::ColsAtCompileTime,T::Options> 
extract2(const Eigen::DenseBase<T2>& full, const Eigen::DenseBase<T>& ind)
{
    using target_t = Eigen::Matrix < T2::Scalar, T::RowsAtCompileTime, T::ColsAtCompileTime, T::Options > ;
    int num_indices = ind.innerSize();
    target_t target(num_indices);
    for (int i = 0; i < num_indices; i++)
    {
        target[i] = full[ind[i]];
    }
    return target;
} 

(this is different from the other one in that you can use a vector of ints as indices and a vector of doubles as source and get a vector of doubles returned instead of a vector of ints as extract() above would do)

2
  • Thanks! I'd guess that is the most efficient way. Though I wonder if this is what is done behind the scenes in subvector extraction in Matlab: something like x[[1,2,4,8]]. Does it go through a for loop over 1,2,4,8 like your solution or something even more efficient? Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 5:41
  • @user1526533, Matlab is different than C++.
    – CroCo
    Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 22:00
0

Using libigl's igl::slice, you can achieve this via:

Eigen::VectorXd result;
igl::slice(x,ind_vec,result);
0

since Eigen 3.4, you can slice Eigen Vectors and Matrices using an array of indices as follows:

Eigen::VectorXd x; //{1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8}
Eigen::VectorXd ind_vec; //{0,2,4,5}

x(ind_vec);             // indexes the vector using a vector of indices
x(ind_vec, Eigen::all); // also works

taken from: https://eigen.tuxfamily.org/dox/group__TutorialSlicingIndexing.html

You can similarly index rows and vectors of matrices in this manner

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