What I'm trying to do is create a stack class. The stack is of type char, but I get a compile time error when I create the char array. The syntax looks fine to me, but when I compile it I get the compile time error below:

stack.cpp: In constructor ‘stack::stack(int)’:
stack.cpp:17:14: error: cannot convert ‘char*’ to ‘int*’ in assignment
         _arr = new char[_capacity];
              ^
stack.cpp: In copy constructor ‘stack::stack(const stack&)’:
stack.cpp:24:14: error: cannot convert ‘char*’ to ‘int*’ in assignment
         _arr = new char[_capacity];

I posted the header and cpp file below:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <cassert>
    using namespace std;

    #define INITCAP 8
    #define TYPE char

    class FullStackException{};
    class EmptyStackException{};

    class stack{
    public:
        // constructor with default capacity value
        stack(int=INITCAP);

        // copy constructor
        stack(const stack&);

        // assignment operator
        stack& operator=(const stack&);

        // destructor
        ~stack();

        // push an element;
        // if fixed sized stack, throw FullStackException when stack is full
        void push(const TYPE x);

        // remove and element; throw EmptyStackException when stack is empty
        void pop();

        // return a reference to the top element without popping; throw EmptyStackException when stack is empty
        TYPE& top();

        // return true if the stack is empty, false otherwise
        bool empty();

        // return the number of elements currently on the stack
        int  size();

        // return the current capacity of the stack
        int  capacity();

    private:
        TYPE * _arr;     // pointer to dynamic integer array
        int _tos;       // index to top of stack
        int _capacity;  // current capacity 
    }; 





    #include "stack.h"

    // constructor with default capacity value
    stack::stack( int n ) {
            _capacity = INITCAP;
            _arr = new char[_capacity];
            _tos = -1;
    }

    // copy constructor
    stack::stack( const stack& s ) {
            _capacity = s._capacity;
            _arr = new char[_capacity];

            for ( int i = 0; i < s._tos + 1; i++ ) {
                    _arr[i] = s._arr[i];
            }
            _tos = s._tos;
    }

    // assignment operator
    stack& stack::operator=( const stack& s ) {
            _capacity = s._capacity;

            for ( int i = 0; i < s._tos + 1; i++ ) {
                    _arr[i] = s._arr[i];
            }
            _tos = s._tos;

            return *this;
    }

    // destructor
    stack::~stack() {
            delete[] _arr;
    }

    // push an element;
    // if fixed sized stack, throw FullStackException when stack is full
    void stack::push(const TYPE x) {
            if ( _tos + 1 == _capacity ) {
                    _capacity *= 2;
                    int *temp = new int[_capacity];
                    for ( int i = 0; i < _capacity; i++ ) {
                            temp[i] = _arr[i];
                    }

                    delete[] temp;
            }
            _tos++;
            _arr[_tos] = x;
    }

    // remove and element; throw EmptyStackException when stack is empty
    void stack::pop() {
            if ( _tos == -1 ) {
                    throw EmptyStackException();
            }
            _tos--;
    }

    // return a reference to the top element without popping; throw EmptyStackException when stack is empty
    TYPE& stack::top() {
            if ( _tos == -1 ) {
                    throw EmptyStackException();
            }
            return _arr[_tos];
    }

    // return true if the stack is empty, false otherwise
    bool stack::empty() {
            return ( _tos == -1 );
    }

    // return the number of elements currently on the stack
    int stack::size() {
            return _tos + 1;
    }

    // return the current capacity of the stack
    int stack::capacity() {
            return _capacity;
    }
  • 7
    Check your macro definitions (better still, use typedefs). The compiler believes that TYPE is int, not char. Figure out where you've told it that. Also, why do you use TYPE sometimes but explicitly write char other times? – Igor Tandetnik Oct 9 '14 at 2:27
  • 1
    It compiles without error for me. Using a macro #define TYPE char is poor style; is some code or command-line option you're not showing us redefining TYPE as int? – Keith Thompson Oct 9 '14 at 2:30
  • 1
    template<typename TYPE> – Ben Voigt Oct 9 '14 at 3:07
  • you have using namespace std in your header but don't even use anything from std in the header. It is not good practice having a using namespace in the header, instead specify namespace when appropriate – Anders K. Oct 31 '14 at 15:08

this looks odd

stack(int=INITCAP);

you seem to completely ignore the argument in your constructor

stack::stack( int n ) {
        _capacity = INITCAP;
        _arr = new char[_capacity];
        _tos = -1;
}

change to

stack(int n=INITCAP);

stack::stack( int n ) {
    _capacity = n;
    _arr = new TYPE[_capacity];
    _tos = -1;
}

or even better

stack::stack( int n )
: _tos(-1), _capacity(n) 
{
   _arr = new TYPE[_capacity];
}

note that you should define the member variables in the same order they are declared.

that may help a little but you should take a look at templates instead, using #define TYPE is ugly

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