I'm have a fully functioning web page with three parts. A banner container, a menu container, and a content container

This is the layout:

The layout of my webpage http://oi60.tinypic.com/2qjhc40.jpg

The problem is that these are positioned using position: fixed; together with margin, left, and top properties. This means that when the web browser is smaller than the size of the web page, I can't scroll on it. And yes. I know the solution is remove "position: fixed" (which has been pointed out on other threads regarding this topic here on stackoverflow). But the problem is that I haven't been able to detain the layout while removing the fixed position, not even close.

The closest to this I've come is by just changing the position property of the content container to relative. This does not affect the layout while the size of the web browser window is larger than the width of my entire page, and when it's the web browser window is smaller than the content container I can indeed scroll on it. But of course, when I decrease the size of the browser window my content container follows with it and overshadows my menu container (since that still has a fixed positioning). Also somehow my menu buttons (which are links placed in a list), even when not overshadowed by the content container, stops reacting when clicking on them and hovering over them.

So is there a good rule of thumb on how you are supposed to use positioning and other properties to position your web page, because clearly I have gotten it all wrong somehow.

These are the relevant css properties of my three containers:

div#banner_container{
    position: fixed;
    width: 650px;
    height: 75px;
    margin-left: 50px;
    margin-top: 8px;
}

div#menu_container {
    top: 95px;
    position: fixed;
    width: 150px;
    height: 150px;
    margin-left: 50px;
    margin-top: 10px;
}

ul#menu {
    position: fixed;
    left: 18px;
    top: 89px;
}

div#content_container {
    position: fixed;
    top: 95px;
    width: 100%;
    max-width: 492px;
    height: 500px;
    margin-left: 210px;
    margin-top: 10px;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; 
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}

Thanks in advance!

  • I know this isn't an appropriate answer for SO, but it may help. Do a search for "responsive design" and start with the simplest example you find. You're designing to the desktop now, but I promise you're going to want your page to work on tablets and phone. May as well get it right from the very start. – Bob Brown Oct 9 '14 at 9:51
  • See: stackoverflow.com/questions/22296568/… – Salman A Oct 9 '14 at 10:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is this good for you ?

http://jsfiddle.net/0cmwhafq/2/

I just set all positions to relative, and used float:left, for your menu and content container

div#banner_container{
    position: relative;
    width: 99%;
    height: 75px;
    margin:1%;
    background-color:red;
}

div#menu_container {
    position: relative;
    width: 18%;
    margin:1%;
    height: 350px;
    background-color:green;
    float:left;


}


div#content_container {
    position: relative;
    width: 79%;
    height: 500px;
    margin-left:1%;
    margin-top:1%;
    float:left;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; 
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    background-color:blue;

}

If you want your layout to be centered, just add a wrapper containing all of them

  • An example like this turned out to be exactly what I needed! By using your example as a template I was able to remove all of the fixed positioning while still keeping the orginal design. And creating a wrapper div specifying the width of the whole web page (to prevent the content container from floating below the menu since I wanted a fixed width on my content container and menu), and the margin (margin: 0 auto;). Made my layout centered in the web browser. Thank you! – Jonatan Stenbacka Oct 9 '14 at 11:28
  • You're welcome! – Dikeneko Oct 9 '14 at 13:14

The fundamental problem here is that you're using position: fixed to style your entire layout. This is really bad practice and can be completely avoided.

If you really don't want to remove the fixed positioning you can instead give your content container an overflow property set to scroll:

div#content_container {
    ...
    overflow: scroll;
}

Note that the overflow property also supports overflow-x and overflow-y which allow you to cater to either the horizontal or vertical scroll bars individually - these may be better in your case.

  • This suggestion just seems to enable scrolling on the content inside my content container. However, I want to be able scroll on the actual browser window (not sure if I'm explaining this right, sorry for my english). Something like body { overflow: scroll } didn't do the trick either. If you could elaborate your point on why using fixed positioning is really bad practise and what I should be doing instead, or maybe provide a link to a page explaining this (because I haven't been able to find that), I would be very grateful! – Jonatan Stenbacka Oct 9 '14 at 9:50
  • @JonatanStenbacka Enabling scrolling on the browser window will not be possible if your entire layout has a fixed position. – James Donnelly Oct 9 '14 at 9:56
  • Well as I said in my question: I know that the issue is that the position of the elements on my web page is set to fixed. But the problem is that I tried all the other types of positioning, without ever being able to restore the right distance between the different containers as well as making everything work as it is supposed to. I'm not looking for a cheap tricks to use to enable scrolling on the browser window, but guidelines on how to use position and other properties to position my web page (maybe a little vague, sorry). – Jonatan Stenbacka Oct 9 '14 at 10:15
  • @JonatanStenbacka I suggest taking a look at the source code for various popular websites and seeing how they achieve this kind of layout themselves. Actually fixing this problem for you would be possible with a very wide range of possibilities and your question would be closed for being too broad. – James Donnelly Oct 9 '14 at 11:07

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