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I have created an application that does the following steps very well -

  • Connects with the Remote Device (SPP) using Bluetooth socket .

  • Then listens for the stream coming from the remote bluetooth device in a separate thread.

  • Then when data stream comes, it passes the data stream to the handler to parse it.

  • When data is parsed, a broadcast is sent and the records are created into the database.

Now I want to add a new functionality -

When the application is in the back ground and is "connected" to remote device, it needs to continue to process the data stream and create records.

So once I get the socket connected, I am passing the result "connected" to the onPostExecute() method.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

1) My all socket related work ( socket connection, socket data parse, data handler ) is in the fragment.

2) Once the connection is established, the private class (Thread - ConnectedThread.java) in the fragment is keep listening to the InputStream

public class EntryFragment extends Fragment{
    //More fragment code here then this
    public class ConnectedThread extends Thread {

        public ConnectedThread(BluetoothSocket socket) {
            //code initialization stuff
        }

         public void run() {
             // Keep listening to the InputStream until an exception occurs
             while (true) 
             {
                    // Read from the InputStream
                    if(mmInStream.available() > 0)
                    {
                       bytes = mmInStream.read(buffer);

                       mHandler.obtainMessage(MESSAGE_READ, 
                       bytes, -1, buffer).sendToTarget();
                    }              
              }   
          }
     }

3) My handler that handles the Read of step 2

    case MESSAGE_READ:

     //Call to AsyncTask to do background processing of data
     new parseStream(getActivity()).execute();
    break;

4) I am connected so do something from onPostExecute() of AsyncTask parseStream

 @Override
 protected void onPostExecute(Void result) {
 //Database related work here

 //Result is connected so listen to data if app goes to background after this state
 if(result.equals("connected")) 
 { 
      Log.i(TAG, "CONNECTED TO Remote Device!");
      Toast.makeText(getActivity(),"CONNECTED TO Remote  
      Device!",Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

      //Do something when connected
      setSetting("STATUS", "Connected");

      // Start the thread to manage the connection and perform transmissions
      mConnectedThread = new ConnectedThread(socket);
      mConnectedThread.start();

      //Do I need to call Service here to handle data ?????
      Intent serviceIntent= new Intent(context, DataProcessService.class);               
      getActivity().startService(serviceIntent);
   }
 }

5) I called service in step 4 with the intention that it will execute when app will go background and process data. But then how will it communicate with the Fragment because my whole work of data processing is in the fragment. Do I really need it to process data OR should I call
broadcast receiver here as it can also process in the background ?

2

I've worked on this quite a bit. I'll share with you what works best in my experience.

-Dedicated bluetooth service, running in it's own separate process, for handling continuous streams of data.

-Avoiding broadcasts when getting & manipulating data; specially if it's fast&large streams of data. This is a mistake that i've made myself in the past when handling bt streams. What i realised is that, it might work OK for small amounts or slow streams, but, broadcasts are very expensive and i saw HUGE performance improvements when replacing them with IPC (UI Thread <- Bluetooth service) to pass the data to be handled in the UI thread.

-IPC, as mentioned previously, definitely the best method to if you'll go for a dedicated bluetooth service. The idea is that you want to bind your Context to the service, in order to send&receive messages. Documentation : http://developer.android.com/guide/components/bound-services.html#Messenger

-When an activity/context bounds to the running service, set an interface so that the activity is registered as to whom the service should reply to. So you will pass any incoming data from the bluetooth radio and send messages to the activity with the new data, avoiding the nasty, unnecessary broadcasts.

-I'm writing a quick, basic example (untested and not compiled) based on my thoughts and online examples (from docs). Hope this is useful

public class BluetoothService extends Service {

     //
     // API keys for the messages being passed across ui thread <-> service
     //
     static final int REGISTER_CLIENT = 3;
     static final int NEW_DATA = 2;
     static final int WRITE_DATA = 1;
     static final int CONNECT_BT = 0;

      // manages actual connection
      private BluetoothManager btManager;

      // who is activity and ready to receive messages? 
      private Messenger clientToReply;

      public int onStartCommand(Intent intent, int flags, int startId) { 

           btManager = new BluetoothManager(this);

           return START_STICKY;//makes sure the service keeps running and get's back up if it gets terminated
      } 

     //
    // Send data back to your activity
    //
     public void sendDataToBoundClient(byte[] bytes) {
           Message msgToClient = new Message();
           msgToClient.what = NEW_DATA;

          Bundle bNewData = new Bundle();
          bNewData.putByteArray("newData", bytes);

          msgToClient.setData(bNewData);
          try {
                clientToReply.send(msgToClient); //send
            } catch (RemoteException e) {
                e.printStackTrace(); //couldn't send
            }
     }

     /**
      * Handles messages received from a bound Context
      */
     public class MessageHandler extends Handler {
       /* (non-Javadoc)
       * @see android.os.Handler#handleMessage(android.os.Message)
       */
        @Override
        public void handleMessage(Message msg) {

               switch (msg.what) {

                     case REGISTER_CLIENT: 
                         // now we know to whom to reply with our messages, callbacks or new data
                         clientToReply = msg.replyTo;
                         break;

                     case WRITE_DATA:
                         break;

                     case CONNECT_BT: 
                         // launches Connect & Connected Threads
                         // would follow the same pattern as in http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/connectivity/bluetooth.html#ConnectingAsAClient
                         btManager.connect(); 
                         break;
               }
        }
    }

}




 //
    // Check examples in http://developer.android.com/guide/topics/connectivity/bluetooth.html#ConnectingAsAClient
    //
    public class BluetoothManager {
        private ConnectThread connectThread; //thread to connect
        private ConnectedThread connectedThread; //thread manages connection

        private BluetoothService service;

        public BluetoothManager(BluetoothService service) {
             this.service = service;
        }

       //
       // stuff omitted...
       //

        public void connect() {
               connectThread = new ConnectThread();
               connectThread.start();
        }


       public void writeData(byte[] bytes) {
              connectedThread.write(bytes);
        }

       public void onDataRead(byte[] bytes) {
            // service knows how to forward this to the client (bound activity, for example)
            this.service.sendDataToBoundClient(bytes);
       }
    }

//
// Based on the example from http://developer.android.com/guide/components/bound-services.html#Messenger
//
public class ActivityMessenger extends Activity {
    /** Messenger for communicating with the service. */
    Messenger mService = null;

   // handle incoming messages
   protected Messenger messagesFromService = new Messenger(new IncomingHandler());

    /** Flag indicating whether we have called bind on the service. */
    boolean mBound;

    /**
     * Class for interacting with the main interface of the service.
     */
    private ServiceConnection mConnection = new ServiceConnection() {
        public void onServiceConnected(ComponentName className, IBinder service) {
            // This is called when the connection with the service has been
            // established, giving us the object we can use to
            // interact with the service.  We are communicating with the
            // service using a Messenger, so here we get a client-side
            // representation of that from the raw IBinder object.
            mService = new Messenger(service);
            mBound = true;
        }

        public void onServiceDisconnected(ComponentName className) {
            // This is called when the connection with the service has been
            // unexpectedly disconnected -- that is, its process crashed.
            mService = null;
            mBound = false;
        }
    };

    public void registerAsClient() {
        if (!mBound) return;
        // Create and send a message to the service, using a supported 'what' value
        Message msg = new Message();
        msg.what = BluetoothService.REGISTER_CLIENT;
        msg.replyTo = messagesFromService; // reply to "me"!

        try {
            mService.send(msg);
        } catch (RemoteException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onStart() {
        super.onStart();
        // Bind to the service
        bindService(new Intent(this, MessengerService.class), mConnection,
            Context.BIND_AUTO_CREATE);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onStop() {
        super.onStop();
        // Unbind from the service
        if (mBound) {
            unbindService(mConnection);
            mBound = false;
        }
    }


    public class IncomingHandler extends Handler {

        @Override
        public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
                 switch (msg.what) {
                      case BluetoothService.NEW_DATA: 
                         Bundle data = msg.getData;
                         // handle your new data!
                         break;
                }
        }

    }

}
}
}
  • Do we need to call a service at fixed intervals to get the data from socket ? I have already implemented the logic of connect and handling data in a fragment so do I need to shift it to BluetoothManager class as in the code above ? The service is suppose to start after a socket connection from this fragment so I think BluetoothManager class needs to be re-implemented. Please see my update! – My God Oct 17 '14 at 14:17
  • @VedPrakash, no you wouldn't need to make calls to the service at fixed intervals. The Service would notify (by sending a new Message) the Main Thread every-time that there is new data available. – ehanoc Oct 20 '14 at 10:28
  • @VedPrakash, i would also add that you should really consider the implications of have your bluetooth workflow in a fragment. You are subject to Android's life-cycle control and unable to properly re-use you're bluetooth workflow outside the scope of your fragment – ehanoc Oct 20 '14 at 10:31
  • When I click "Connect" from some view then the requirement is to come to this fragment view in order to show it to the user. The user can then close the app and the data will continue to flow in background. So I am bound to use this fragment. However, looking at your code I agree about the "bound" scope of using fragment. – My God Oct 20 '14 at 12:12
  • @VedPrakash, ideally you should bound it to the base activity of the fragment. Better yet, bind whatever activity is active and let the service on the background handle the data and forward it to whoever is bound. This way, you can put the app on background, close current activities/fragments and you will still be doing bluetooth work. Also you wouldn't need to restart your ConnectedThread every-time you handle a piece of data. You only need one – ehanoc Oct 21 '14 at 8:16

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