142

I want to iterate through each element in the map<string, int> without knowing any of its string-int values or keys.

What I have so far:

void output(map<string, int> table)
{
       map<string, int>::iterator it;
       for (it = table.begin(); it != table.end(); it++)
       {
            //How do I access each element?  
       }
}
325

You can achieve this like following :

map<string, int>::iterator it;

for ( it = symbolTable.begin(); it != symbolTable.end(); it++ )
{
    std::cout << it->first  // string (key)
              << ':'
              << it->second   // string's value 
              << std::endl ;
}

With C++11 ( and onwards ),

for (auto const& x : symbolTable)
{
    std::cout << x.first  // string (key)
              << ':' 
              << x.second // string's value 
              << std::endl ;
}

With C++17 ( and onwards ),

for( auto const& [key, val] : symbolTable )
{
    std::cout << key         // string (key)
              << ':'  
              << val        // string's value
              << std::endl ;
}
  • 5
    add the "auto" type in front of "it" – iedoc Apr 3 '15 at 13:41
  • 1
    @P0W Why "auto const&" for C++11 but "const auto&" for C++17? Any difference between "auto const&" and "const auto&"? – Eric Jun 2 '17 at 2:26
  • 17
    There is no difference, it's just a matter of taste. However it seems like @P0W 's taste is not very conistent... – Kapichu Jul 6 '17 at 20:16
  • 8
    Thanks for updating with the C++17 one, I was looking for the auto const& [key, val] : symbolTable format! – Water Mar 5 '18 at 1:49
  • 2
    @haram You might have to set "ISO C++17 Standard (/std:c++17)" in the project settings (Configuration Properties > C/C++ > Language > C++ Language Standard) – Swordfish Aug 31 '18 at 5:57
24

Try the following

for ( const auto &p : table )
{
   std::cout << p.first << '\t' << p.second << std::endl;
} 

The same can be written using an ordinary for loop

for ( auto it = table.begin(); it != table.end(); ++it  )
{
   std::cout << it->first << '\t' << it->second << std::endl;
} 

Take into account that value_type for std::map is defined the following way

typedef pair<const Key, T> value_type

Thus in my example p is a const reference to the value_type where Key is std::string and T is int

Also it would be better if the function would be declared as

void output( const map<string, int> &table );
12

The value_type of a map is a pair containing the key and value as it's first and second member, respectively.

map<string, int>::iterator it;
for (it = symbolTable.begin(); it != symbolTable.end(); it++)
{
    std::cout << it->first << ' ' << it->second << '\n';
}

Or with C++11, using range-based for:

for (auto const& p : symbolTable)
{
    std::cout << p.first << ' ' << p.second << '\n';
}
4

As @Vlad from Moscow says, Take into account that value_type for std::map is defined the following way:

typedef pair<const Key, T> value_type

This then means that if you wish to replace the keyword auto with a more explicit type specifier, then you could this;

for ( const pair<const string, int> &p : table ) {
   std::cout << p.first << '\t' << p.second << std::endl;
} 

Just for understanding what auto will translate to in this case.

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