2

I have a problem with proper usage of threads (boost::thread)
I want to have X threads running the same function at the same time like so

while( true )
    server.run();

Which is the way I have it currently programmed, this is the run function

void server::run()
{
    std::vector<boost::thread*> threads;
    for(std::size_t i = 0; i < threadPool; ++i)
    {
        threads.push_back( new boost::thread( boost::bind(&seed::server::pollEvent,this) ) );
    }

    for( auto & x : threads )
        x->join();

    for( auto & x : threads )
        x->detach();

    for( auto & x : threads )
        delete x;
}

but, this keeps using up more and more RAM, starting at ~20MB and going up into infinity, my question is, what is the proper approach to this?

Minimal example of what I'm actually doing

This problem does not occur when using SFML's threads. (CPU usage is slightly higher, but does not hog ram for each thread, they're cleared properly)

  • how large is threadPool? – Sam Miller Oct 9 '14 at 17:06
  • Try to create a minimal working example of this. This is very helpful for potential helpers and often one will discover the issue while doing it. – dom0 Oct 9 '14 at 17:06
  • @SamMiller 4, it's nothing crazy I assure you, it should be handled just fine. – P.K. Oct 9 '14 at 17:07
  • I don't think it's related to your problem, but you can't detach from a thread that's already been joined. – Michael Burr Oct 9 '14 at 17:11
  • @MichaelBurr No, it is not related. It was just a thing I wanted to try before posting here. – P.K. Oct 9 '14 at 17:12
6
for( unsigned int i = threads.size()-1; i > 0; i-- )
    delete threads[i];

You never delete threads[0]. The for loop condition is incorrect as i never becomes 0 inside the loop body. Also, you don't need reverse iteration here, as you are not removing the actual elements. Thus

for( auto & x : threads )
    delete x;

suffices.

Secondly you violate the precondition of boost::thread::detach. It says

Preconditions: the thread is joinable.

But you already joined them. The threads probably represent not-a-thread after join (postcondition of join):

Postcondition: If *this refers to a thread of execution on entry, that thread of execution has completed. *this no longer refers to any thread of execution.

It might be worth checking if your application creates an insane amount of threads due to this. I don't think so, but better safe than sorry.

--

The minimal example does not leak. (boost 1.56.0, GCC 4.9.1, Linux)

by the way, the minimal example provided does not compile, here's a fixed version:

#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <vector>

class server
{
public:
    server( unsigned short int thrNum )
    {

        if( thrNum )
        threadPool = thrNum;
    };

    ~server()
    {
    };

    void run()
    {
        std::vector<boost::thread*> threads;
        for(std::size_t i = 0; i < threadPool; ++i)
        {
        threads.push_back( new boost::thread( boost::bind(&server::pollEvent,this) ) );
        }

        for( auto & x : threads )
        x->join();

        for( auto & x : threads )
        x->detach();

        for( auto & x : threads )
        delete x;
    };

private:

    void pollEvent() { return; };

    unsigned short int threadPool = 1;
};

int main()
{
    server s(4);
    while(true)
    s.run();

    return 1;
}
  • Hah, sorry, I'm not yet completely used to C++11-for loops, but even with that changed the ram usage still goes up on every server::run() iteration. – P.K. Oct 9 '14 at 17:09
  • I updated my answer, I think there is another issue. See above. – dom0 Oct 9 '14 at 17:15
  • 1
    DANGER: being i unsigned, checking for i>=0 will result in infinite loop. An end condition can be i!=0u-1 or properly loop in the unsigned domain for(unsigned i=0; i>thread.size(); ++i) delete threads[threads.size()-1-i] – Emilio Garavaglia Oct 9 '14 at 17:17
  • Detaching is not the reason why it's using up extra memory with each thread. – P.K. Oct 9 '14 at 17:17
  • Can't reproduce the issue with the source you provided. Issue is probably somewhere else... – dom0 Oct 9 '14 at 17:27
0

Answer: You are calling detach() on the thread objects. This detaches the real underlying thread (and its stack) from the boost thread, leaving it undeleted at the point of ->delete() being called.

If you have c++11, why use boost threads at all? std::thread is movable so works in a vector without new/delete.

another iteration of the above minimal example:

#include <thread>
#include <vector>

static const int threadPool = 4;

void noop()
{

}

void run()
{
    std::vector<std::thread> threads;
    for(std::size_t i = 0; i < threadPool; ++i)
    {
        threads.push_back( std::thread( noop ) );
    }

    for( auto & x : threads )
        x.join();
}


int main()
{
    while(true)
        run();

    return 1;
}
  • He said multiple times that detach doesn't change anything, which makes sense, since the underlying object is gone with join returning. – dom0 Oct 9 '14 at 17:37
  • I'm using boost::thread because std::thread doesn't completely work with my MinGW. And after deleting detach and such it still doesn't work. – P.K. Oct 9 '14 at 17:39
  • OK, then use std::unique_ptr<boost::thread> and avoid the use of delete. Is this a debug build? Does it use less memory in a release build? Is your example here real? (i.e could the problem be somewhere else?) – Richard Hodges Oct 9 '14 at 17:41
  • In any case, I just checked the documentation of boost::thread - it's movable so you can store it in a std::vector. – Richard Hodges Oct 9 '14 at 17:43
  • I already tried unique_ptr, shared_ptr, assigning with new, thread_group, so on. I really did my research on this too, found nothing. The example I gave is the actual code I have in my program, and I'd like to point out the fact that it does work flawlessly with SFML threads. So it's just a boost issue. I also know that it's movable, again, I was just checking if maybe a simple change would fix it. – P.K. Oct 9 '14 at 17:43
0

I don't have an answer for your question, but I do have some information that i think is interesting but will not fit into a comment.

First, I was able to reproduce your problem with MinGW 4.8.1 running on Win7 x64 with the program built as a 32-bit x86 process (I'm not saying that an x64 build didn't repro the problem; I didn't try x64 because my MinGW Boost libraries were built only for 32-bit). In case it matters, my Boost libraries were built for static linking and I used the debug versions.

The problem did not reproduce when built with MSVC 12 (Visual Studio 2013).

Also, I can simplify the program that reproduces the problem to the following, which eliminates all distractions of detach(), pointers, and dynamic memory allocation:

#include <windows.h>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

void thread_func()
{
    // Sleep(1);
    return;
}

int main()
{
    for (;;) {
        boost::thread t1(thread_func);
        boost::thread t2(thread_func);

        t1.join();
        t2.join();
    }
}

It doesn't take much to make the memory leak go away (or at least slow to the point of being unseen). Any of the following seem to do it for me:

  • uncomment the call to Sleep(1)
  • use only a single thread
  • use two threads, but move the t1.join() to before the creation of t2

Unfortunately, using gbd I don't have the resources to debug what seems to be a race condition in thread clean-up.

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