167

I have a time.Time value obtained from time.Now() and I want to get another time which is exactly 1 month ago.

I know subtracting is possible with time.Sub() (which wants another time.Time), but that will result in a time.Duration and I need it the other way around.

4 Answers 4

197

In response to Thomas Browne's comment, because lnmx's answer only works for subtracting a date, here is a modification of his code that works for subtracting time from a time.Time type.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    now := time.Now()

    fmt.Println("now:", now)

    count := 10
    then := now.Add(time.Duration(-count) * time.Minute)
    // if we had fix number of units to subtract, we can use following line instead fo above 2 lines. It does type convertion automatically.
    // then := now.Add(-10 * time.Minute)
    fmt.Println("10 minutes ago:", then)
}

Produces:

now: 2009-11-10 23:00:00 +0000 UTC
10 minutes ago: 2009-11-10 22:50:00 +0000 UTC

Not to mention, you can also use time.Hour or time.Second instead of time.Minute as per your needs.

Playground: https://play.golang.org/p/DzzH4SA3izp

3
  • 6
    Don't user ParseDuration for static values! Just use -10 * time.Minute, that's what those constants are defined for. E.g. just time.Now().Add(-10 * time.Minute) is all you would need.
    – Dave C
    Mar 26, 2015 at 3:10
  • 42
    Wow, the time API is so inconsistent. time.Add is to add a duration, while time.Sub is to substract a time. Glad I found this answer because I was looking at the Sub function and I would never have guessed it has a different signature from Add.
    – laurent
    Oct 22, 2015 at 13:33
  • 8
    Also note that go implicitly converts now.Add(-10 * time.Minute) to now.Add(time.Duration(-10) * time.Minute) in case your getting an error when multiplying a duration by an int value...
    – notzippy
    Oct 27, 2015 at 17:27
166

Try AddDate:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    now := time.Now()

    fmt.Println("now:", now)

    then := now.AddDate(0, -1, 0)

    fmt.Println("then:", then)
}

Produces:

now: 2009-11-10 23:00:00 +0000 UTC
then: 2009-10-10 23:00:00 +0000 UTC

Playground: http://play.golang.org/p/QChq02kisT

3
  • 41
    what about subtracting a time? Feb 24, 2015 at 20:54
  • 39
    Subtracting a time and subtracting time are different operations. To subtract a time, you would call time.Now().Sub(time.Time{}) to get the difference as a Duration. To subtract an amount of time, say 1 minute, you'd have to do time.Now().Add(time.Minute * -1). The lack of symmetry between Sub() and Add() is infuriating.
    – jcope
    Sep 3, 2020 at 21:54
  • 2
    Diff() or such would have been a much more intuitive alternative for calculating duration than the current Add/Sub confusion...
    – Ward D.S.
    Nov 9, 2020 at 10:32
69

You can negate a time.Duration:

then := now.Add(- dur)

You can even compare a time.Duration against 0:

if dur > 0 {
    dur = - dur
}

then := now.Add(dur)

You can see a working example at http://play.golang.org/p/ml7svlL4eW

2
  • 2
    There's a catch though: -1 * dur will work, but d := -1 ; dur = d * dur will generate an error: "mismatched types int and time.Duration"
    – BlakBat
    Aug 31, 2016 at 14:00
  • 7
    That is the right answer for the question's title and it should be marked as the answer.
    – selalerer
    Nov 5, 2016 at 14:26
3

There's time.ParseDuration which will happily accept negative durations, as per manual. Otherwise put, there's no need to negate a duration where you can get an exact duration in the first place.

E.g. when you need to substract an hour and a half, you can do that like so:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    now := time.Now()

    fmt.Println("now:", now)

    duration, _ := time.ParseDuration("-1.5h")

    then := now.Add(duration)

    fmt.Println("then:", then)
}

https://play.golang.org/p/63p-T9uFcZo

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