2

How can I find out if a string is a valid HTML tag?

For example: a, or h1, div, or span, ... are a valid HTML tagname. But ar, or abc, or div2, ... are invaild.

var Str = 'strongg';

if( IsValid(Str) ) {
// do something
}

Thanks.

PS I think, this was not a stupid question and I found a good solution for it here (see below). But I do not know why this thread has "-3" ? Wondering!

3
  • 1
    Create an array of valid tag names, check the string against that array
    – tymeJV
    Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 19:43
  • You can get a list of valid tag names here. Why not store them in an array in IsValid and compare Str to each element? Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 19:43
  • I know this solution . But is there a better method? Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 19:47

5 Answers 5

13

HTML5 introduced the HTMLUnknownElement interface which must be used for elements that are not defined by the standard HTML specifications.

When using document.createElement, if the element is not a valid tag by specification, it will be an object of type HTMLUnknownElement. Since using .toString will return [object type], you can create the element and test for that type:

function isValid(input) {
  return document.createElement(input).toString() != "[object HTMLUnknownElement]";
}

console.log( isValid("tr") );
console.log( isValid("a") );
console.log( isValid("trs") );
console.log( isValid("strong") );
console.log( isValid("strongg") );

However, this many not work in older browsers.

1
  • Thanks for the answer. I use already createElement in my project, therefore it is a gut solution for my function. Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 20:26
1

Acknowledgement to Stryner upon whose answer this builds.

Firstly, I don't want to presuppose anything about your input. It might not even be a lexically-valid tag name, let alone one the browser understands. Perhaps it's not even a string? An invalid argument to document.createElement() will cause an error, so I catch this and return false.

function isValid(input) {
  try {
    return document.createElement(input).constructor.name !== 'HTMLUnknownElement';
  } catch(e) {
    return false;
  }
}

console.log(isValid('h1'));  //known tag name
console.log(isValid('wibble'));  //not known tag name
console.log(isValid('12'));  //not valid tag name
console.log(isValid(false)); //not even a string

Secondly, I have observed that, in Firefox at least, document.createElement() with an argument that contains hyphens will return not a HTMLUnknownElement but rather a HTMLElement. (I assume the reason for this is to do with support for Web Components / Custom Elements, but I cannot find further reading that explains the behaviour here.) I will boldly assume you do not want to allow these either.

function isValid(input) {
  try {
    const el = document.createElement(input);
    return el.constructor.name !== 'HTMLUnknownElement' &&
      el.constructor.name !== 'HTMLElement';
  } catch(e) {
    return false;
  }
}

console.log(isValid('h1'));  //known tag name
console.log(isValid('wibble'));  //not known tag name
console.log(isValid('wibble-wibble'));  //not known but returns a HTMLElement
console.log(isValid('12'));  //not valid tag name
console.log(isValid(false)); //not even a string

0

You will have to get and use your own array of HTML tags to check this - I would personally go with W3C spec instead of the w3schools one.

Then, you want to use indexOf on the array and check if it's not -1, something like this:

var isValid = function (tagCandidate) { return (validHtmlTags.indexOf(tagCandidate) > -1); };

0

Just a fast way to test tag names incase someone needs it.

First create a case insensitive set. So you don't need to worry about case when testing a string.
Answer borrowed from Jonas Wilms

class CaseInsensitiveSet extends Set {
    constructor(values){
        super(Array.from(values, it => it.toLowerCase()));
    }; 
    
    add(str) {
        return super.add(str.toLowerCase());
    }; 
    
    has(str) {
        return super.has(str.toLowerCase());
    }; 
    
    delete(str) {
        return super.delete(str.toLowerCase());
    }; 
}; 

Then create a set using his new class and all the tag name. Don't worry all current tags are here.

var TagNames = new CaseInsensitiveSet(`a,abbr,acronym,abbr,address,applet,embed,object,area,article
,aside,audio,b,base,basefont,bdi,bdo,big,blockquote,body,br,button,canvas,caption,center,cite
,code,col,colgroup,data,datalist,dd,del,details,dfn,dialog,dir,ul,div,dl,dt,em,embed,fieldset
,figcaption,figure,font,footer,form,frame,frameset,h1 to <h6>,head,header,hr,html,i,iframe,img
,input,ins,kbd,label,legend,li,link,main,map,mark,meta,meter,nav,noframes,noscript,object,ol
,optgroup,option,output,p,param,picture,pre,progress,q,rp,rt,ruby,s,samp,script,section,select
,small,source,span,strike,del,s,strong,style,sub,summary,sup,svg,table,tbody,td,template,textarea
,tfoot,th,thead,time,title,tr,track,tt,u,ul,var,video,wbr`.split(",")); 

Ok now you can use the built in has function to get the result in O(1).

TagNames.has("A") 
// returns true 
TagNames.has("a") 
// returns true 
TagNames.has("tAblE") 
// returns true 
-1

Get a list of valid HTML tags (or whatever you want to compare with) and simply do something like:

function IsValid(s) {
    var tags = ['a', 'p', 'etc...'];
    return tags.indexOf(s) != -1;
}
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