266

I am trying to make an autocorrect system, and when a user types a word with a capital letter, the autocorrect doesn't work. In order to fix this, I made a copy of the string typed, applied .lowercaseString, and then compared them. If the string is indeed mistyped, it should correct the word. However then the word that replaces the typed word is all lowercase. So I need to apply .uppercaseString to only the first letter. I originally thought I could use

nameOfString[0]

but this apparently does not work. How can I get the first letter of the string to uppercase, and then be able to print the full string with the first letter capitalized?

Thanks for any help!

1
  • 1
    the accepted answer is no longer valid, please check this one
    – Juan Boero
    Mar 11, 2021 at 20:01

30 Answers 30

560

Including mutating and non mutating versions that are consistent with API guidelines.

Swift 3:

extension String {
    func capitalizingFirstLetter() -> String {
        let first = String(characters.prefix(1)).capitalized
        let other = String(characters.dropFirst())
        return first + other
    }

    mutating func capitalizeFirstLetter() {
        self = self.capitalizingFirstLetter()
    }
}

Swift 4:

extension String {
    func capitalizingFirstLetter() -> String {
      return prefix(1).uppercased() + self.lowercased().dropFirst()
    }

    mutating func capitalizeFirstLetter() {
      self = self.capitalizingFirstLetter()
    }
}
14
  • 3
    Just a note that .capitalizedString no longer works in Xcode 7 Beta 4. Strings have changed a bit in Swift 2.0.
    – kakubei
    Jul 27, 2015 at 10:20
  • 2
    @Kirsteins: you're right, my bad. I'd forgotten to import Foundation sheepish grin
    – kakubei
    Jul 28, 2015 at 15:55
  • 3
    @LoryLory Use .uppercaseString for that
    – Kirsteins
    Sep 8, 2015 at 16:58
  • 2
    This is the seriously effective answer mate..Working with Xcode 7.1.1/ Swift 2.1....Thanks :) Dec 8, 2015 at 13:08
  • 26
    its just .capitalized now. Note also capitalizedStringWith(_ locale:)
    – Raphael
    Mar 7, 2017 at 10:12
189

Swift 5.1 or later

extension StringProtocol {
    var firstUppercased: String { prefix(1).uppercased() + dropFirst() }
    var firstCapitalized: String { prefix(1).capitalized + dropFirst() }
}

Swift 5

extension StringProtocol {
    var firstUppercased: String { return prefix(1).uppercased() + dropFirst() }
    var firstCapitalized: String { return prefix(1).capitalized + dropFirst() }
}

"Swift".first  // "S"
"Swift".last   // "t"
"hello world!!!".firstUppercased  // "Hello world!!!"

"DŽ".firstCapitalized   // "Dž"
"Dž".firstCapitalized   // "Dž"
"dž".firstCapitalized   // "Dž"
14
  • 3
    Nice job. I edited mine to pass lowercase first and renamed to Proper.
    – ericgu
    Mar 2, 2015 at 19:12
  • I like the swift 2.1.1 solution, but when I run my app and check for leaks, it's showing this is leaking.
    – Henny Lee
    Jan 9, 2016 at 17:07
  • 1
    I just created a new project and it seems it causes a memory leak when this is used together with a UITextField observer for UITextFieldTextDidChangeNotification.
    – Henny Lee
    Jan 9, 2016 at 19:35
  • @Henry this has nothing to do with the code itself. if you experience any performance/memory issue you should report it to Apple.
    – Leo Dabus
    Jan 9, 2016 at 19:51
  • 1
    @LeoDabus I guess it’s down to Which one makes the code’s intent more evident. Empty string literal is perhaps best. Sep 22, 2017 at 0:02
107

Swift 3.0

for "Hello World"

nameOfString.capitalized

or for "HELLO WORLD"

nameOfString.uppercased
3
  • 3
    Charlesism has already answered with the Swift 3 version two months ago...
    – Eric Aya
    Dec 2, 2016 at 13:22
  • 15
    This will capitalize the first character of every word of the String and not just the first word.
    – Bocaxica
    Mar 8, 2017 at 17:23
  • Returns: An uppercase copy of the string. public func uppercased() -> String Swift 3.0 or for "HELLO WORLD" nameOfString.uppercased INSTEAD OF ABOVE nameOfString.uppercased() Jun 6, 2017 at 7:26
52

Swift 4.0

string.capitalized(with: nil)

or

string.capitalized

However this capitalizes first letter of every word

Apple's documentation:

A capitalized string is a string with the first character in each word changed to its corresponding uppercase value, and all remaining characters set to their corresponding lowercase values. A “word” is any sequence of characters delimited by spaces, tabs, or line terminators. Some common word delimiting punctuation isn’t considered, so this property may not generally produce the desired results for multiword strings. See the getLineStart(_:end:contentsEnd:for:) method for additional information.

2
  • 2
    I have no idea why people aren't receptive to this answer. If people want just the first word capitalized they can grab out the first and capitalize it most easily with the capitalized property. Dec 10, 2017 at 21:03
  • 2
    Importantly, "Capitalised" is correct for all Unicode characters, while using "uppercased" for the first character isn't.
    – gnasher729
    Aug 5, 2018 at 11:20
25

For first character in word use .capitalized in swift and for whole-word use .uppercased()

25
extension String {
    func firstCharacterUpperCase() -> String? {
        let lowercaseString = self.lowercaseString

        return lowercaseString.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(lowercaseString.startIndex...lowercaseString.startIndex, withString: String(lowercaseString[lowercaseString.startIndex]).uppercaseString)
    }
}

let x = "heLLo"
let m = x.firstCharacterUpperCase()

For Swift 5:

extension String {
    func firstCharacterUpperCase() -> String? {
        guard !isEmpty else { return nil }
        let lowerCasedString = self.lowercased()
        return lowerCasedString.replacingCharacters(in: lowerCasedString.startIndex...lowerCasedString.startIndex, with: String(lowerCasedString[lowerCasedString.startIndex]).uppercased())
    }
}
2
  • This is the best answer IMO - keeps it simple for all future cases.
    – Robert
    Jan 5, 2016 at 2:20
  • No need to check if string isEmpty and initialize a string to replace either. You can simply unwrap the first character and in case it fails just return nil. This can be simplified as var firstCharacterUpperCase: String? { guard let first = first else { return nil } return lowercased().replacingCharacters(in: startIndex...startIndex, with: first.uppercased()) }
    – Leo Dabus
    May 22, 2020 at 0:28
10

Swift 2.0 (Single line):

String(nameOfString.characters.prefix(1)).uppercaseString + String(nameOfString.characters.dropFirst())
1
  • 1
    Upvoted. However, this assumes that the original string is all lower case. I added .localizedLowercaseString at the end to make it work with strings like: aNYsTring. String(nameOfString.characters.prefix(1)).uppercaseString + String(nameOfString.characters.dropFirst()).localizedLowercaseString
    – oyalhi
    Sep 6, 2016 at 17:45
9

In swift 5

https://www.hackingwithswift.com/example-code/strings/how-to-capitalize-the-first-letter-of-a-string

extension String {
    func capitalizingFirstLetter() -> String {
        return prefix(1).capitalized + dropFirst()
    }

    mutating func capitalizeFirstLetter() {
        self = self.capitalizingFirstLetter()
    }
}

use with your string

let test = "the rain in Spain"
print(test.capitalizingFirstLetter())
6

Swift 3 (xcode 8.3.3)

Uppercase all first characters of string

let str = "your string"
let capStr = str.capitalized

//Your String

Uppercase all characters

let str = "your string"
let upStr = str.uppercased()

//YOUR STRING

Uppercase only first character of string

 var str = "your string"
 let capStr = String(str.characters.prefix(1)).uppercased() + String(str.characters.dropFirst())

//Your string
1
  • This will not capitalise just the first character of a string
    – Rool Paap
    Jul 27, 2017 at 11:37
4

Here’s a version for Swift 5 that uses the Unicode scalar properties API to bail out if the first letter is already uppercase, or doesn’t have a notion of case:

extension String {
  func firstLetterUppercased() -> String {
    guard let first = first, first.isLowercase else { return self }
    return String(first).uppercased() + dropFirst()
  }
}
1
  • No need to initialize a String with the first character. return first.uppercased() + dropFirst() or one liner (first?.uppercased() ?? "") + dropFirst()
    – Leo Dabus
    May 22, 2020 at 0:32
3

From Swift 3 you can easily use textField.autocapitalizationType = UITextAutocapitalizationType.sentences

2

I'm getting the first character duplicated with Kirsteins' solution. This will capitalise the first character, without seeing double:

var s: String = "hello world"
s = prefix(s, 1).capitalizedString + suffix(s, countElements(s) - 1)

I don't know whether it's more or less efficient, I just know that it gives me the desired result.

3
  • You could test whether capitalizing the first character changes that character - by saving it in its own constant then testing equality with the new 'capitalized' string, and if they are the same then you already have what you want.
    – David H
    Apr 23, 2015 at 13:14
  • Your post inspired this answer - thanks!: func capitaizeFirstChar(var s: String) -> String { if s.isEmpty == false { let range = s.startIndex...s.startIndex let original = s.substringWithRange(range) let capitalized = original.capitalizedString if original == capitalized { return s } s.replaceRange(range, with: capitalized) } return s }
    – David H
    Apr 23, 2015 at 13:43
  • 1
    In newer versions of Swift, countElements is just count. Jul 16, 2015 at 22:25
2

Capitalize the first character in the string

extension String {
    var capitalizeFirst: String {
        if self.characters.count == 0 {
            return self

        return String(self[self.startIndex]).capitalized + String(self.characters.dropFirst())
    }
}
2

In Swift 3.0 (this is a little bit faster and safer than the accepted answer) :

extension String {
    func firstCharacterUpperCase() -> String {
        if let firstCharacter = characters.first {
            return replacingCharacters(in: startIndex..<index(after: startIndex), with: String(firstCharacter).uppercased())
        }
        return ""
    }
}

nameOfString.capitalized won't work, it will capitalize every words in the sentence

2

I'm assuming that you'd like to capitalise the first word of an entire string of words. For example : "my cat is fat, and my fat is flabby" should return "My Cat Is Fat, And My Fat Is Flabby".

Swift 5 :

To do this, you can import Foundation and then use the capitalized property. Example :

import Foundation
var x = "my cat is fat, and my fat is flabby"
print(x.capitalized)  //prints "My Cat Is Fat, And My Fat Is Flabby"

If you want to be a purist and NOT import Foundation, then you can create a String extension.

extension String {
    func capitalize() -> String {
        let arr = self.split(separator: " ").map{String($0)}
        var result = [String]()
        for element in arr {
            result.append(String(element.uppercased().first ?? " ") + element.suffix(element.count-1))
        }
        return result.joined(separator: " ")
    }
}

Then you can use this, like so :

var x = "my cat is fat, and my fat is flabby"
print(x.capitalize()) //prints "My Cat Is Fat, And My Fat Is Flabby"
1
  • This fixed my problem because I wanted to make 'ExamPLE' from 'examPLE', built-in capitalized property returns the word capitalized but it also lowercase all other letters in the word, like this 'Example' which was not working for me. Thanks @vnerurkar May 6 at 12:02
1

Credits to Leonardo Savio Dabus:

I imagine most use cases is to get Proper Casing:

import Foundation

extension String {

    var toProper:String {
        var result = lowercaseString
        result.replaceRange(startIndex...startIndex, with: String(self[startIndex]).capitalizedString)
        return result
    }
}
1

My solution:

func firstCharacterUppercaseString(string: String) -> String {
    var str = string as NSString
    let firstUppercaseCharacter = str.substringToIndex(1).uppercaseString
    let firstUppercaseCharacterString = str.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(NSMakeRange(0, 1), withString: firstUppercaseCharacter)
    return firstUppercaseCharacterString
}
1
1

If you want to capitalised each word of string you can use this extension

Swift 4 Xcode 9.2

extension String {
    var wordUppercased: String {
        var aryOfWord = self.split(separator: " ")
        aryOfWord =  aryOfWord.map({String($0.first!).uppercased() + $0.dropFirst()})
        return aryOfWord.joined(separator: " ")
    }
}

Used

print("simple text example".wordUppercased) //output:: "Simple Text Example"
1
  • 3
    simply use .capitalized
    – kakubei
    Aug 1, 2018 at 13:23
1

Swift 4

func firstCharacterUpperCase() -> String {
        if self.count == 0 { return self }
        return prefix(1).uppercased() + dropFirst().lowercased()
    }
0

Here's the way I did it in small steps, its similar to @Kirsteins.

func capitalizedPhrase(phrase:String) -> String {
    let firstCharIndex = advance(phrase.startIndex, 1)
    let firstChar = phrase.substringToIndex(firstCharIndex).uppercaseString
    let firstCharRange = phrase.startIndex..<firstCharIndex
    return phrase.stringByReplacingCharactersInRange(firstCharRange, withString: firstChar)
}
0

Incorporating the answers above, I wrote a small extension that capitalizes the first letter of every word (because that's what I was looking for and figured someone else could use it).

I humbly submit:

extension String {
    var wordCaps:String {
        let listOfWords:[String] = self.componentsSeparatedByString(" ")
        var returnString: String = ""
        for word in listOfWords {
            if word != "" {
                var capWord = word.lowercaseString as String
                capWord.replaceRange(startIndex...startIndex, with: String(capWord[capWord.startIndex]).uppercaseString)
                returnString = returnString + capWord + " "
            }
        }
        if returnString.hasSuffix(" ") {
            returnString.removeAtIndex(returnString.endIndex.predecessor())
        }
        return returnString
    }
}
2
  • 2
    Swift String has a method called capitalizedString. If you need to apply it to an array of strings check this answer stackoverflow.com/a/28690655/2303865
    – Leo Dabus
    Feb 17, 2016 at 19:59
  • The question is asking for sentence case and this answer may not respect other languages—best to use the existing capitalizedString.
    – Warpling
    Nov 22, 2021 at 13:02
0
func helperCapitalizeFirstLetter(stringToBeCapd:String)->String{
    let capString = stringToBeCapd.substringFromIndex(stringToBeCapd.startIndex).capitalizedString
    return capString
}

Also works just pass your string in and get a capitalized one back.

0

Swift 3 Update

The replaceRange func is now replaceSubrange

nameOfString.replaceSubrange(nameOfString.startIndex...nameOfString.startIndex, with: String(nameOfString[nameOfString.startIndex]).capitalized)
1
  • the capitalizedString method has been renamed to capitalized
    – Rool Paap
    Jul 27, 2017 at 11:40
0

I'm partial to this version, which is a cleaned up version from another answer:

extension String {
  var capitalizedFirst: String {
    let characters = self.characters
    if let first = characters.first {
      return String(first).uppercased() + 
             String(characters.dropFirst())
    }
    return self
  }
}

It strives to be more efficient by only evaluating self.characters once, and then uses consistent forms to create the sub-strings.

0

Swift 4 (Xcode 9.1)

extension String {
    var capEachWord: String {
        return self.split(separator: " ").map { word in
            return String([word.startIndex]).uppercased() + word.lowercased().dropFirst()
        }.joined(separator: " ")
    }
}
1
  • String has already a property called capitalized exactly for this purpose
    – Leo Dabus
    May 22, 2020 at 0:41
0

If your string is all caps then below method will work

labelTitle.text = remarks?.lowercased().firstUppercased

This extension will helps you

extension StringProtocol {
    var firstUppercased: String {
        guard let first = first else { return "" }
        return String(first).uppercased() + dropFirst()
    }
}
4
  • 1
    simply use .capitalized
    – kakubei
    Aug 1, 2018 at 13:23
  • @kakubei Why you do negative vote. This method is for Sentance case. Capitalized will do every first character of the word to capital. Example String :- (THIS IS A BOY) .capitalized will return (This Is A Boy) and this method will return (This is a boy) Both are different. (Please do +ve Vote or Remove negative)
    – Ashu
    Aug 2, 2018 at 5:17
  • You’re right @ashu, my apologies. However I can’t upvote until you edit the answer so maybe just make a small white space edit and I shall upvote it. Sorry again.
    – kakubei
    Aug 3, 2018 at 7:45
  • No need to initialize a String with the first character. return first.uppercased() + dropFirst() or one liner return (first?.uppercased() ?? "") + dropFirst()
    – Leo Dabus
    May 22, 2020 at 0:39
-1
extension String {
    var lowercased:String {
        var result = Array<Character>(self.characters);
        if let first = result.first { result[0] = Character(String(first).uppercaseString) }
        return String(result)
    }
}
-1

Add this line in viewDidLoad() method.

 txtFieldName.autocapitalizationType = UITextAutocapitalizationType.words
-2

Edit: This no longer works with Text, only supports input fields now.

Just in case someone ends here with the same question regarding SwiftUI:

// Mystring is here
TextField("mystring is here")
   .autocapitalization(.sentences)


// Mystring Is Here
Text("mystring is here")
   .autocapitalization(.words)
2
  • Doesn't work, tested on Xcode 12.5.1. Autocapitalization is designed for input fields, not Text elements. Aug 12, 2021 at 17:42
  • You are right, I think in previous Xcode version it worked, I usually do not post untested code. Aug 28, 2021 at 12:50
-4

For swift 5, you can simple do like that:

Create extension for String:

extension String {
    var firstUppercased: String {
        let firstChar = self.first?.uppercased() ?? ""
        return firstChar + self.dropFirst()
    }
}

then

yourString.firstUppercased

Sample: "abc" -> "Abc"

0

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