746

If I have a reference to an object:

var test = {};

that will potentially (but not immediately) have nested objects, something like:

{level1: {level2: {level3: "level3"}}};

What is the best way to check for the existence of property in deeply nested objects?

alert(test.level1); yields undefined, but alert(test.level1.level2.level3); fails.

I’m currently doing something like this:

if(test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.level3) {
    alert(test.level1.level2.level3);
}

but I was wondering if there’s a better way.

8

60 Answers 60

1
2
2

I was having the same issue and and wanted to see if I could come up with a my own solution. This accepts the path you want to check as a string.

function checkPathForTruthy(obj, path) {
  if (/\[[a-zA-Z_]/.test(path)) {
    console.log("Cannot resolve variables in property accessors");
    return false;
  }

  path = path.replace(/\[/g, ".");
  path = path.replace(/]|'|"/g, "");
  path = path.split(".");

  var steps = 0;
  var lastRef = obj;
  var exists = path.every(key => {
    var currentItem = lastRef[path[steps]];
    if (currentItem) {
      lastRef = currentItem;
      steps++;
      return true;
    } else {
      return false;
    }
  });

  return exists;
}

Here is a snippet with some logging and test cases:

console.clear();
var testCases = [
  ["data.Messages[0].Code", true],
  ["data.Messages[1].Code", true],
  ["data.Messages[0]['Code']", true],
  ['data.Messages[0]["Code"]', true],
  ["data[Messages][0]['Code']", false],
  ["data['Messages'][0]['Code']", true]
];
var path = "data.Messages[0].Code";
var obj = {
  data: {
    Messages: [{
      Code: "0"
    }, {
      Code: "1"
    }]
  }
}

function checkPathForTruthy(obj, path) {
  if (/\[[a-zA-Z_]/.test(path)) {
    console.log("Cannot resolve variables in property accessors");
    return false;
  }

  path = path.replace(/\[/g, ".");
  path = path.replace(/]|'|"/g, "");
  path = path.split(".");

  var steps = 0;
  var lastRef = obj;
  var logOutput = [];
  var exists = path.every(key => {
    var currentItem = lastRef[path[steps]];
    if (currentItem) {
      logOutput.push(currentItem);
      lastRef = currentItem;
      steps++;
      return true;
    } else {
      return false;
    }
  });
  console.log(exists, logOutput);
  return exists;
}

testCases.forEach(testCase => {
  if (checkPathForTruthy(obj, testCase[0]) === testCase[1]) {
    console.log("Passed: " + testCase[0]);
  } else {
    console.log("Failed: " + testCase[0] + " expected " + testCase[1]);
  }
});

2

And yet another one which is very compact:

function ifSet(object, path) {
  return path.split('.').reduce((obj, part) => obj && obj[part], object)
}

called:

let a = {b:{c:{d:{e:'found!'}}}}
ifSet(a, 'b.c.d.e') == 'found!'
ifSet(a, 'a.a.a.a.a.a') == undefined

It won't perform great since it's splitting a string (but increases readability of the call) and iterates over everything even if it's already obvious that nothing will be found (but increases readability of the function itself).

at least is faster than _.get http://jsben.ch/aAtmc

1

Slight edit to this answer to allow nested arrays in the path

var has = function (obj, key) {
    return key.split(".").every(function (x) {
        if (typeof obj != "object" || obj === null || !x in obj)
            return false;
        if (obj.constructor === Array) 
            obj = obj[0];
        obj = obj[x];
        return true;
    });
}

Check linked answer for usages :)

1

I thought I'd add another one that I came up with today. The reason I am proud of this solution is that it avoids nested brackets that are used in many solutions such as Object Wrap (by Oliver Steele):

(in this example I use an underscore as a placeholder variable, but any variable name will work)

//the 'test' object
var test = {level1: {level2: {level3: 'level3'}}};

let _ = test;

if ((_=_.level1) && (_=_.level2) && (_=_.level3)) {

  let level3 = _;
  //do stuff with level3

}

//you could also use 'stacked' if statements. This helps if your object goes very deep. 
//(formatted without nesting or curly braces except the last one)

let _ = test;

if (_=_.level1)
if (_=_.level2)
if (_=_.level3) {

   let level3 = _;
   //do stuff with level3
}


//or you can indent:
if (_=_.level1)
  if (_=_.level2)
    if (_=_.level3) {

      let level3 = _;
      //do stuff with level3
}

1

Well there are no really good answer for one-liners to use in html templates, so i made one using ES6 Proxies. You just pass an object or value to the "traverse" function and do as much nested calls as you want closing them with function call which will return value or fallback value. Using:

const testObject = { 
  deep: { 
    nested: { 
      obj: { 
        closure: () => { return "closure" },
        number: 9,
        boolean: true,
        array: [1, 2, { foo: { bar: true } }]
      } 
    }
  }
}

traverse(testObject).deep() 
// {nested: {…}}

traverse(testObject).non.existent() 
// undefined

traverse(testObject).deep.nested.obj.closure()() 
// closure

traverse(testObject).deep.nested.obj.array[5]('fallback')
// fallback

traverse(testObject).deep.nested.obj.array[2]()
// {foo: {…}}

traverse(testObject).deep.nested.obj.array[2].foo.bar()
// true

traverse(testObject).deep.nested.obj.array[2].foo.bar[4]('fallback')
// fallback

traverse(testObject).completely.wrong[3].call().WILL_THROW()
// Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'WILL_THROW' of undefined

Function itself:

const traverse = (input) => {
    // unique empty object
    const unset = new Object();
    // we need wrapper to ensure we have access to the same unique empty object
    const closure = (input) => {
        // wrap each input into this
        const handler = new Function();
        handler.input = input;    
        // return wrappers proxy 
        return new Proxy(handler, {
            // keep traversing
            get: (target, name) => {
                // if undefined supplied as initial input
                if (!target.input) {
                    return closure(unset);
                }
                // otherwise
                if (target.input[name] !== undefined) {
                    // input has that property
                    return closure(target.input[name]);
                } else {
                    return closure(unset);
                }
            },
            // result with fallback
            apply: (target, context, args) => {
                return handler.input === unset ? 
                    args[0] : handler.input;
            }
        })
    }
    return closure(input);    
}

1

Simply use https://www.npmjs.com/package/js-aid package for checking for the nested object.

0

I automated the process

if(isset(object,["prop1","prop2"])){
// YES!

}

function isset(object, props){
    var dump;
    try {
        for(var x in props){
            if(x == 0) {
                dump = object[props[x]];
                return;
            }
            dump = dump[props[x]];
        }
    } catch(e) {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}
3
  • A couple things to note. You're doing a for/in over an array, which is not recommended. That is really meant for objects. There's no guarantee that the order of execution will be consistent. Also, if you're going to loop over the properties, I probably wouldn't use try/catch. I think you'll get better performance taking a if( props[x] in object ) approach, or if( object.hasOwnProperty(props[x]) ) if you don't want to include prototype properties. My situation was such that I was only interested in the deepest property. That's why I chose try/catch. – user113716 Oct 27 '10 at 14:55
  • If you look closely, I move in the object level using the dump variable, I am not staying at level 1 – Cedric Dugas Oct 28 '10 at 13:01
  • but your right about for/in, my heart is broken :/, it is also slower – Cedric Dugas Oct 28 '10 at 13:11
0

Another ES5 solution:

function hasProperties(object, properties) {
    return !properties.some(function(property){
        if (!object.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
            return true;
        }
        object = object[property];
        return false;
    });
}
0

My solution that I use since long time (using string unfortunaly, couldn't find better)

function get_if_exist(str){
    try{return eval(str)}
    catch(e){return undefined}
}

// way to use
if(get_if_exist('test.level1.level2.level3')) {
    alert(test.level1.level2.level3);
}

// or simply 
alert(get_if_exist('test.level1.level2.level3'));

edit: this work only if object "test" have global scope/range. else you have to do something like :

// i think it's the most beautiful code I have ever write :p
function get_if_exist(obj){
    return arguments.length==1 || (obj[arguments[1]] && get_if_exist.apply(this,[obj[arguments[1]]].concat([].slice.call(arguments,2))));
}

alert(get_if_exist(test,'level1','level2','level3'));

edit final version to allow 2 method of call :

function get_if_exist(obj){
    var a=arguments, b=a.callee; // replace a.callee by the function name you choose because callee is depreceate, in this case : get_if_exist
    // version 1 calling the version 2
    if(a[1] && ~a[1].indexOf('.')) 
        return b.apply(this,[obj].concat(a[1].split('.')));
    // version 2
    return a.length==1 ? a[0] : (obj[a[1]] && b.apply(this,[obj[a[1]]].concat([].slice.call(a,2))));
}

// method 1
get_if_exist(test,'level1.level2.level3');


// method 2
get_if_exist(test,'level1','level2','level3');
0

Another option (close to this answer) :

function resolve(root, path){
    try {
        return (new Function(
            'root', 'return root.' + path + ';'
        ))(root);
    } catch (e) {}
}

var tree = { level1: [{ key: 'value' }] };
resolve(tree, 'level1[0].key'); // "value"
resolve(tree, 'level1[1].key'); // undefined

More on this : https://stackoverflow.com/a/18381564/1636522

0

Yet another version:

function nestedPropertyExists(obj, props) {
    var prop = props.shift();
    return prop === undefined
        ? true
        : obj.hasOwnProperty(prop) ? nestedPropertyExists(obj[prop], props) : false;
}

nestedPropertyExists({a:{b:{c:1}}}, ['a','b','c']); // returns true
nestedPropertyExists({a:{b:{c:1}}}, ['a','b','c','d']); // returns false
0

I wrote a library called l33teral to help test for nested properties. You can use it like this:

var myObj = {/*...*/};
var hasNestedProperties = leet(myObj).probe('prop1.prop2.prop3');

I do like the ES5/6 solutions here, too.

0
function isIn(string, object){
    var arr = string.split(".");
    var notFound = true;
    var length = arr.length;
    for (var i = 0; i < length; i++){
        var key = arr[i];
        if (!object.hasOwnProperty(key)){
            notFound = false;
            break;
        }
        if ((i + length) <= length){
            object = object[key];
        }
    }
    return notFound;
}
var musicCollection = {
    hasslehoff: {
        greatestHits : true
    }
};
console.log(isIn("hasslehoff.greatestHits", musicCollection));
console.log(isIn("hasslehoff.worseHits", musicCollection));

here my String based delimiter version.

0

Based on @Stephane LaFlèche's answer, I came up with my alternative version of the script.

Demo on JSFiddle

var obj = {"a":{"b":{"c":"Hello World"}},"resTest":"potato","success":"This path exists"};
checkForPathInObject = function(object,path,value) {
        var pathParts   = path.split("."),
            result      = false;
        // Check if required parameters are set; if not, return false
        if(!object || typeof object == 'undefined' || !path || typeof path != 'string')
            return false;
        /* Loop through object keys to find a way to the path or check for value
         * If the property does not exist, set result to false
         * If the property is an object, update @object
         * Otherwise, update result */
        for(var i=0;i<pathParts.length;i++){
            var currentPathPart = pathParts[i];
            if(!object.hasOwnProperty( currentPathPart )) {
                result = false;
            } else if (object[ currentPathPart ] && path == pathParts[i]) {
                result = pathParts[i];
                break;
            } else if(typeof object[ currentPathPart ] == 'object') {
                object = object[ currentPathPart ];
            } else {
                result = object[ currentPathPart ];
            }
        }
        /* */
        if(typeof value != 'undefined' && value == result)
            return true;
        return result;
};
// Uncomment the lines below to test the script
// alert( checkForPathInObject(obj,'a.b.c') ); // Results "Hello World"
// alert( checkForPathInObject(obj,'a.success') ); // Returns false
// alert( checkForPathInObject(obj,'resTest', 'potato') ); // Returns true
0

I am using a function in the following fashion.

var a = {};
a.b = {};
a.b.c = {};
a.b.c.d = "abcdabcd";

function isDefined(objectChainString) {
    try {
        var properties = objectChainString.split('.');
        var currentLevel = properties[0];
        if (currentLevel in window) {
            var consolidatedLevel = window[currentLevel];
            for (var i in properties) {
                if (i == 0) {
                    continue;
                } else {
                    consolidatedLevel = consolidatedLevel[properties[i]];
                }
            }
            if (typeof consolidatedLevel != 'undefined') {
                return true;
            } else {
                return false;
            }
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    } catch (e) {
        return false;
    }
}

// defined
console.log(checkUndefined("a.b.x.d"));
//undefined
console.log(checkUndefined("a.b.c.x"));
console.log(checkUndefined("a.b.x.d"));
console.log(checkUndefined("x.b.c.d"));
2
  • wouldn't be better just a try catch? – R01010010 Feb 2 '17 at 11:30
  • I guess you can. for example: try { var d = {}; d.e = []; typeof d.e.r.t } catch(err) { console.log(err.message); } – Pratyush Feb 3 '17 at 16:39
0

The very best and simplest answer is:

var isDefinedPath = function (path) {

    var items = path.split ('.');

    if (!items || items.length < 1 || !(items[0] in window)) { return false; }

    var buffer = [items[0]];
    for (var i = 1, e = items.length; i < e; i ++) {
        buffer.push (items[i]);
        if (eval ('typeof(' + buffer.join ('.') + ') == "undefined"')) {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;

}

test: isDefinedPath ('level1.level2.level3');

first level cannot be array, others can

0

CMS solution works great but usage/syntax can be more convenient. I suggest following

var checkNested = function(obj, structure) {

  var args = structure.split(".");

  for (var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
    if (!obj || !obj.hasOwnProperty(args[i])) {
      return false;
    }
    obj = obj[args[i]];
  }
  return true;
};

You can simply use object notation using dot instead of supplying multiple arguments

var test = {level1:{level2:{level3:'level3'}} };

checkNested(test, 'level1.level2.level3'); // true
checkNested(test, 'level1.level2.foo'); // false
0

Another way to work this out is for example, having the following object :

var x = {
    a: {
        b: 3
    }
};

then, what I did was add the following function to this object :

x.getKey = function(k){
        var r ;
        try {
            r = eval('typeof this.'+k+' !== "undefined"');
        }catch(e){
            r = false;
        }
        if(r !== false){
            return eval('this.'+k);
        }else{
            console.error('Missing key: \''+k+'\'');
            return '';
        }
    };

then you can test :

x.getKey('a.b');

If it's undefined the function returns "" (empty string) else it returns the existing value.

Please also consider this other more complex solution checking the link : JS object has property deep check

Object.prototype.hasOwnNestedProperty = function(propertyPath){
    if(!propertyPath)
        return false;

    var properties = propertyPath.split('.');
    var obj = this;

    for (var i = 0; i < properties.length; i++) {
        var prop = properties[i];

        if(!obj || !obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)){
            return false;
        } else {
            obj = obj[prop];
        }
    }

    return true;
};

// Usage: 
var obj = {
   innerObject:{
       deepObject:{
           value:'Here am I'
       }
   }
}

obj.hasOwnNestedProperty('innerObject.deepObject.value');

P.S.: There is also a recursive version.

0

you can path object and path seprated with "."

function checkPathExist(obj, path) {
  var pathArray =path.split(".")
  for (var i of pathArray) {
    if (Reflect.get(obj, i)) {
      obj = obj[i];
		
    }else{
		return false;
    }
  }
	return true;
}

var test = {level1:{level2:{level3:'level3'}} };

console.log('level1.level2.level3 => ',checkPathExist(test, 'level1.level2.level3')); // true
console.log( 'level1.level2.foo => ',checkPathExist(test, 'level1.level2.foo')); // false

0

Here's a little helper function I use that, to me, is pretty simple and straightforward. Hopefully it's helpful to some :).

static issetFromIndices(param, indices, throwException = false) {
    var temp = param;

    try {
        if (!param) {
            throw "Parameter is null.";
        }

        if(!Array.isArray(indices)) {
            throw "Indices parameter must be an array.";
        }

        for (var i = 0; i < indices.length; i++) {
            var index = indices[i];
            if (typeof temp[index] === "undefined") {
                throw "'" + index + "' index is undefined.";
            }


            temp = temp[index];
        }
    } catch (e) {
        if (throwException) {
            throw new Error(e);
        } else {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return temp;
}

var person = {
    hobbies: {
        guitar: {
            type: "electric"
        }
    }
};

var indices = ["hobbies", "guitar", "type"];
var throwException = true;

try {
    var hobbyGuitarType = issetFromIndices(person, indices, throwException);
    console.log("Yay, found index: " + hobbyGuitarType);
} catch(e) {
    console.log(e);
}
1
  • It will be more useful if you could add some detail about your answer, like how this code is going to fix the problem and what it does? – DarkSuniuM Feb 21 '19 at 2:51
0
getValue (o, key1, key2, key3, key4, key5) {
    try {
      return o[key1][key2][key3][key4][key5]
    } catch (e) {
      return null
    }
}
0
0

There's a little pattern for this, but can get overwhelming at some times. I suggest you use it for two or three nested at a time.

if (!(foo.bar || {}).weep) return;
// Return if there isn't a 'foo.bar' or 'foo.bar.weep'.

As I maybe forgot to mention, you could also extend this further. Below example shows a check for nested foo.bar.weep.woop or it would return if none are available.

if (!((foo.bar || {}).weep || {}).woop) return;
// So, return if there isn't a 'foo.bar', 'foo.bar.weep', or 'foo.bar.weep.woop'.
// More than this would be overwhelming.
0

If you happen to be using AngularJs you can use the $parse service to check if a deep object property exists, like this:

if( $parse('model.data.items')(vm) ) {
    vm.model.data.items.push('whatever');
}

to avoid statements like this:

if(vm.model && vm.model.data && vm.model.data.items) {
    ....
}

don't forget to inject the $parse service into your controller

for more info: https://glebbahmutov.com/blog/angularjs-parse-hacks/

0
/**
 * @method getValue
 * @description simplifies checking for existance and getting a deeply nested value within a ceratin context
 * @argument {string} s       string representation of the full path to the requested property 
 * @argument {object} context optional - the context to check defaults to window
 * @returns the value if valid and set, returns undefined if invalid / not available etc.
 */
var getValue = function( s, context ){
    var fn = function(){
        try{
            return eval(s);
        }catch(e){
            return undefined;
        }
    }
    return fn.call(context||window,s);
}

and usage :

if( getValue('a[0].b[0].b[0].d') == 2 ) // true
0

Quite a lot of answers but still: why not simpler?

An es5 version of getting the value would be:

function value(obj, keys) {
    if (obj === undefined) return obj;
    if (keys.length === 1 && obj.hasOwnProperty(keys[0])) return obj[keys[0]];
    return value(obj[keys.shift()], keys);
}

if (value(test, ['level1', 'level2', 'level3'])) {
  // do something
}

you could also use it with value(config, ['applet', i, 'height']) || 42

Credits to CMS for his ES6 solution that gave me this idea.

0
function propsExists(arg) {
  try {
    const result = arg()
  
    if (typeof result !== 'undefined') {
      return true
    }

    return false
  } catch (e) {
    return false;
  }
}

This function will also test for 0, null. If they are present it will also return true.

Example:

function propsExists(arg) {
  try {
    const result = arg()
  
    if (typeof result !== 'undefined') {
      return true
    }

    return false
  } catch (e) {
    return false;
  }
}

let obj = {
  test: {
    a: null,
    b: 0,
    c: undefined,
    d: 4,
    e: 'Hey',
    f: () => {},
    g: 5.4,
    h: false,
    i: true,
    j: {},
    k: [],
    l: {
        a: 1,
    }
  }
};


console.log('obj.test.a', propsExists(() => obj.test.a))
console.log('obj.test.b', propsExists(() => obj.test.b))
console.log('obj.test.c', propsExists(() => obj.test.c))
console.log('obj.test.d', propsExists(() => obj.test.d))
console.log('obj.test.e', propsExists(() => obj.test.e))
console.log('obj.test.f', propsExists(() => obj.test.f))
console.log('obj.test.g', propsExists(() => obj.test.g))
console.log('obj.test.h', propsExists(() => obj.test.h))
console.log('obj.test.i', propsExists(() => obj.test.i))
console.log('obj.test.j', propsExists(() => obj.test.j))
console.log('obj.test.k', propsExists(() => obj.test.k))
console.log('obj.test.l', propsExists(() => obj.test.l))

0

I have used this function for access properties of the deeply nested object and it working for me...

this is the function

/**
 * get property of object
 * @param obj object
 * @param path e.g user.name
 */
getProperty(obj, path, defaultValue = '-') {
  const value = path.split('.').reduce((o, p) => o && o[p], obj);

  return value ? value : defaultValue;
}

this is how I access the deeply nested object property

{{ getProperty(object, 'passengerDetails.data.driverInfo.currentVehicle.vehicleType') }}
0

Another way :

/**
 * This API will return particular object value from JSON Object hierarchy.
 *
 * @param jsonData : json type : JSON data from which we want to get particular object
 * @param objHierarchy : string type : Hierarchical representation of object we want to get,
 *                       For example, 'jsonData.Envelope.Body["return"].patient' OR 'jsonData.Envelope.return.patient'
 *                       Minimal Requirements : 'X.Y' required.
 * @returns evaluated value of objHierarchy from jsonData passed.
 */
function evalJSONData(jsonData, objHierarchy){
    
    if(!jsonData || !objHierarchy){
        return null;
    }
    
    if(objHierarchy.indexOf('["return"]') !== -1){
        objHierarchy = objHierarchy.replace('["return"]','.return');
    }
    
    let objArray = objHierarchy.split(".");
    if(objArray.length === 2){
        return jsonData[objArray[1]];
    }
    return evalJSONData(jsonData[objArray[1]], objHierarchy.substring(objHierarchy.indexOf(".")+1));
}
-3

Just wrote this function today which does a deep search for a property in a nested object and returns the value at the property if found.

/**
 * Performs a deep search looking for the existence of a property in a 
 * nested object. Supports namespaced search: Passing a string with
 * a parent sub-object where the property key may exist speeds up
 * search, for instance: Say you have a nested object and you know for 
 * certain the property/literal you're looking for is within a certain
 * sub-object, you can speed the search up by passing "level2Obj.targetProp"
 * @param {object} obj Object to search
 * @param {object} key Key to search for
 * @return {*} Returns the value (if any) located at the key
 */
var getPropByKey = function( obj, key ) {
    var ret = false, ns = key.split("."),
        args = arguments,
        alen = args.length;

    // Search starting with provided namespace
    if ( ns.length > 1 ) {
        obj = (libName).getPropByKey( obj, ns[0] );
        key = ns[1];
    }

    // Look for a property in the object
    if ( key in obj ) {
        return obj[key];
    } else {
        for ( var o in obj ) {
            if ( (libName).isPlainObject( obj[o] ) ) {
                ret = (libName).getPropByKey( obj[o], key );
                if ( ret === 0 || ret === undefined || ret ) {
                    return ret;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}
1
  • i think question is about verifying the existence of property not search it out in any one of the children of the object which is different. a.b.c and a.e.c will both return value if urfunc(a,'c') is called. function like if(exists(a.b.c)) is ideal – Muhammad Umer Feb 24 '15 at 17:23
-3

In typeScript you can do something like this:

 if (object.prop1 && object.prop1.prop2 && object.prop1.prop2.prop3) {
    const items = object.prop1.prop2.prop3
    console.log(items);
 }
1
  • 2
    So... exactly the same as in JavaScript mentioned in the question? – JJJ Mar 5 '19 at 21:22
1
2

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