559

If I have a reference to an object:

var test = {};

that will potentially (but not immediately) have nested objects, something like:

{level1: {level2: {level3: "level3"}}};

What is the best way to check for the existence of property in deeply nested objects?

alert(test.level1); yields undefined, but alert(test.level1.level2.level3); fails.

I’m currently doing something like this:

if(test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.level3) {
    alert(test.level1.level2.level3);
}

but I was wondering if there’s a better way.

53 Answers 53

347
+500

You have to do it step by step if you don't want a TypeError, because if one of the members is null or undefined, and you try to access a member an exception will be thrown.

You can either simply catch the exception, or make a function to test the existence of multiple levels, something like this:

function checkNested(obj /*, level1, level2, ... levelN*/) {
  var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);

  for (var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
    if (!obj || !obj.hasOwnProperty(args[i])) {
      return false;
    }
    obj = obj[args[i]];
  }
  return true;
}

var test = {level1:{level2:{level3:'level3'}} };

checkNested(test, 'level1', 'level2', 'level3'); // true
checkNested(test, 'level1', 'level2', 'foo'); // false

UPDATE 2019-05-16:

Here is a shorter version, using ES6 features and recursion (it's also in proper tail call form):

function checkNested(obj, level,  ...rest) {
  if (obj === undefined) return false
  if (rest.length == 0 && obj.hasOwnProperty(level)) return true
  return checkNested(obj[level], ...rest)
}
  • 4
    arguments is not actually an array. Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments) converts it to a formal array. Learn – deefour Nov 10 '12 at 1:00
  • 22
    this'd be a lot more efficient to do var obj = arguments[0]; and start from var i = 1 instead of copying the arguments object – Claudiu Oct 31 '13 at 19:45
  • 20
    FYI, you can also use _.get() from lodash for this lodash.com/docs#get – vasa Oct 12 '15 at 21:19
  • 3
    In ES6 the args variable declaration can be removed and and ...args can be used as the second argument for the checkNested method. developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Vernon Dec 28 '16 at 15:49
  • 4
    This is a very unmaintainable. If any property keys change (they will), all devs on the project would have to 'string search' the entire codebase. This isn't really a solution to the problem, as it introduces a much bigger problem – Drenai Jan 14 '18 at 11:20
336

Here is a pattern I picked up from Oliver Steele:

var level3 = (((test || {}).level1 || {}).level2 || {}).level3;
alert( level3 );

In fact that whole article is a discussion of how you can do this in javascript. He settles on using the above syntax (which isn't that hard to read once you get used to it) as an idiom.

  • 8
    @wared I think it is interesting mostly for how concise it is. There is a detailed discussion of the performance characteristics in the linked post. Yes it always does all the tests, but it avoids creating temp vars, and you can alias {} to a var if you want to prevent the overhead of creating a new empty object each time. In 99% of cases I would not expect speed to matter, and in cases where it does there is no substitute for profiling. – Gabe Moothart Sep 5 '13 at 18:13
  • 9
    @MuhammadUmer No, the point of (test || {}) is that if test is undefined, then you're doing ({}.level1 || {}). Of course, {}.level1 is undefined, so that means you're doing {}.level2, and so on. – Joshua Taylor Apr 28 '15 at 16:06
  • 21
    you said "which isn't that hard to read once you get used to it". Well, these are signs you know already this is a mess. Then why suggest this solution? It is prone to typos and gives absolutely nothing to readability. Just look it! If i have to write an ugly line, it should asswell be readable; so i'm going to just stick with if(test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.level3) – Sharky Sep 30 '16 at 9:16
  • 7
    Unless I'm missing something, this won't work for boolean end-properties that might be false... sadly. Otherwise I love this idiom. – T3db0t Nov 17 '16 at 20:01
  • 8
    This is both hard to read and hard to type. – pootzko Jun 29 '17 at 9:36
236

Update

Looks like lodash has added _.get for all your nested property getting needs.

_.get(countries, 'greece.sparta.playwright')

https://lodash.com/docs#get


Previous answer

lodash users may enjoy lodash.contrib which has a couple methods that mitigate this problem.

getPath

Signature: _.getPath(obj:Object, ks:String|Array)

Gets the value at any depth in a nested object based on the path described by the keys given. Keys may be given as an array or as a dot-separated string. Returns undefined if the path cannot be reached.

var countries = {
        greece: {
            athens: {
                playwright:  "Sophocles"
            }
        }
    }
};

_.getPath(countries, "greece.athens.playwright");
// => "Sophocles"

_.getPath(countries, "greece.sparta.playwright");
// => undefined

_.getPath(countries, ["greece", "athens", "playwright"]);
// => "Sophocles"

_.getPath(countries, ["greece", "sparta", "playwright"]);
// => undefined
  • Lodash really needs a _.isPathDefined(obj, pathString) method. – Matthew Payne Jan 9 '15 at 16:34
  • @MatthewPayne It'd be nice perhaps, but it really isn't necessary. You could do it yourself really easily function isPathDefined(object, path) { return typeof _.getPath(object, path) !== 'undefined'; } – Thor84no May 12 '15 at 11:33
  • 11
    Lodash has this same functionality itself: _.get(countries, 'greece.sparta.playwright', 'default'); // → 'default' _.has(countries, 'greece.spart.playwright') // → false – Tom May 15 '15 at 18:23
  • @Tom thanks. Really glad they include that by default now. – Austin Pray May 15 '15 at 22:56
  • even better would be _.result – Shishir Arora Aug 29 '15 at 8:50
175

I have done performance tests (thank you cdMinix for adding lodash) on some of the suggestions proposed to this question with the results listed below.

Disclaimer #1 Turning strings into references is unnecessary meta-programming and probably best avoided. Don't lose track of your references to begin with. Read more from this answer to a similar question.

Disclaimer #2 We are talking about millions of operations per millisecond here. It is very unlikely any of these would make much difference in most use cases. Choose whichever makes the most sense knowing the limitations of each. For me I would go with something like reduce out of convenience.

Object Wrap (by Oliver Steele) – 34 % – fastest

var r1 = (((test || {}).level1 || {}).level2 || {}).level3;
var r2 = (((test || {}).level1 || {}).level2 || {}).foo;

Original solution (suggested in question) – 45%

var r1 = test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.level3;
var r2 = test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.foo;

checkNested – 50%

function checkNested(obj) {
  for (var i = 1; i < arguments.length; i++) {
    if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(arguments[i])) {
      return false;
    }
    obj = obj[arguments[i]];
  }
  return true;
}

get_if_exist – 52%

function get_if_exist(str) {
    try { return eval(str) }
    catch(e) { return undefined }
}

validChain – 54%

function validChain( object, ...keys ) {
    return keys.reduce( ( a, b ) => ( a || { } )[ b ], object ) !== undefined;
}

objHasKeys – 63%

function objHasKeys(obj, keys) {
  var next = keys.shift();
  return obj[next] && (! keys.length || objHasKeys(obj[next], keys));
}

nestedPropertyExists – 69%

function nestedPropertyExists(obj, props) {
    var prop = props.shift();
    return prop === undefined ? true : obj.hasOwnProperty(prop) ? nestedPropertyExists(obj[prop], props) : false;
}

_.get – 72%

deeptest – 86%

function deeptest(target, s){
    s= s.split('.')
    var obj= target[s.shift()];
    while(obj && s.length) obj= obj[s.shift()];
    return obj;
}

sad clowns – 100% – slowest

var o = function(obj) { return obj || {} };

var r1 = o(o(o(o(test).level1).level2).level3);
var r2 = o(o(o(o(test).level1).level2).foo);
  • 13
    it should be noted that the more % a test has - the SLOWER it is – avalanche1 Feb 3 '17 at 9:12
  • 1
    what about lodash _.get() ? how performant is it comparing to those answers? – beniutek May 31 '17 at 14:07
  • 3
    Tests with _.get() - jsben.ch/7aJgK – cdMinix Jun 27 '17 at 7:47
  • 1
    Each method of these is slower or faster than other ones depending on situation. If all keys are found then "Object Wrap" could be fastest, but if one of the keys is not found then "Native solution/Original solution" could be faster. – evilReiko Aug 28 '17 at 6:55
  • 1
    @evilReiko Any method will be slower if no keys are found but in proportion to each other it's still pretty much the same. However, you are right – this is more of an intellectual exercise than anything else. We are talking about a million iterations per millisecond here. I see no use case where it would make much difference. Me personally I would go for reduce or try/catch out of convenience. – unitario Aug 30 '17 at 6:36
43

You can read an object property at any depth, if you handle the name like a string: 't.level1.level2.level3'.

window.t={level1:{level2:{level3: 'level3'}}};

function deeptest(s){
    s= s.split('.')
    var obj= window[s.shift()];
    while(obj && s.length) obj= obj[s.shift()];
    return obj;
}

alert(deeptest('t.level1.level2.level3') || 'Undefined');

It returns undefined if any of the segments is undefined.

26
var a;

a = {
    b: {
        c: 'd'
    }
};

function isset (fn) {
    var value;
    try {
        value = fn();
    } catch (e) {
        value = undefined;
    } finally {
        return value !== undefined;
    }
};

// ES5
console.log(
    isset(function () { return a.b.c; }),
    isset(function () { return a.b.c.d.e.f; })
);

If you are coding in ES6 environment (or using 6to5) then you can take advantage of the arrow function syntax:

// ES6 using the arrow function
console.log(
    isset(() => a.b.c),
    isset(() => a.b.c.d.e.f)
);

Regarding the performance, there is no performance penalty for using try..catch block if the property is set. There is a performance impact if the property is unset.

Consider simply using _.has:

var object = { 'a': { 'b': { 'c': 3 } } };

_.has(object, 'a');
// → true

_.has(object, 'a.b.c');
// → true

_.has(object, ['a', 'b', 'c']);
// → true
  • 2
    I think the try-catch approach is the best answer. There's a philosophical difference between querying an object for its type, and assuming the API exists and failing accordingly if it doesn't. The latter is more appropriate in loosely typed languages. See stackoverflow.com/a/408305/2419669. The try-catch approach is also far clearer than if (foo && foo.bar && foo.bar.baz && foo.bar.baz.qux) { ... }. – yangmillstheory Jan 31 '16 at 3:39
20

how about

try {
   alert(test.level1.level2.level3)
} catch(e) {
 ...whatever

}
  • 14
    I don't think try/catch is a good way to test for existence of an object: try/catch is meant to handle exceptions, not normal conditions such as the test here. I think (typeof foo == "undefined") at each step is better -- and in general, there's probably some refactoring required if you're working with such deeply nested properties. Also, try/catch will cause a break in Firebug (and in any browser where break-on-error is turned on) if an exception is thrown. – Sam Dutton Nov 9 '10 at 12:00
  • I vote on this, because browser will check the existence twice if you use other solutions. Lets say you want to call ´a.c.b = 2´. Browser has to check the existence before modifying the value (otherwise it would be a memory error caught by OS). – user669677 Sep 2 '13 at 12:04
  • 4
    The question still remain: witch one is faster for browsers to set up a try catch or call hasOwnProperty() n times? – user669677 Sep 2 '13 at 12:12
  • 14
    Why is this bad again? This looks cleanest to me. – Austin Pray Jun 4 '14 at 19:26
  • I would say: If you expect that the property exist than it is okay to wrap it into a try block. If it then doesn't exist it is an error. But if you're just lazy and put regular code into the catch block for the case that the property doesn't exist try/catch is misused. Here a if/else or something similar is required. – robsch Aug 9 '16 at 13:55
16

ES6 answer, thoroughly tested :)

const propExists = (obj, path) => {
    return !!path.split('.').reduce((obj, prop) => {
        return obj && obj[prop] ? obj[prop] : undefined;
    }, obj)
}

→see Codepen with full test coverage

  • I made your tests failed setting the value of the flat prop to 0. You must care about type coercion. – germain Oct 2 '18 at 7:13
  • @germain Does this work for you? (I explicitly compare === for the different falsys, and added test. If you have a better idea, let me know). – Frank Nocke Oct 2 '18 at 11:22
  • I made your tests failed again setting the value of the flat prop to false. And then you might want to have a value in your object set to undefined (I know it's weird but is is JS). I made a positive false value set to 'Prop not Found': const hasTruthyProp = prop => prop === 'Prop not found' ? false : true const path = obj => path => path.reduce((obj, prop) => { return obj && obj.hasOwnProperty(prop) ? obj[prop] : 'Prop not found' }, obj) const myFunc = compose(hasTruthyProp, path(obj)) – germain Oct 2 '18 at 15:19
  • Can you fork my codepen (top-right, easy), correct & add tests, and send me the URL of yours? Thanks =) – Frank Nocke Oct 3 '18 at 18:16
  • Check this – germain Oct 4 '18 at 5:01
12

You can also use tc39 optional chaining proposal together with babel 7 - tc39-proposal-optional-chaining

Code would look like this:

  const test = test?.level1?.level2?.level3;
  if (test) alert(test);
  • Note that this syntax will almost certainly change, as some TC39 members have objections. – jhpratt Sep 24 '18 at 1:59
  • Probably but this will be available in some form in time, and that's the only thing that matters .. It's one of the features I miss the most in JS. – Goran.it Sep 24 '18 at 7:00
10

I think the following script gives more readable representation.

declare a function:

var o = function(obj) { return obj || {};};

then use it like this:

if (o(o(o(o(test).level1).level2).level3)
{

}

I call it "sad clown technique" because it is using sign o(


EDIT:

here is a version for TypeScript

it gives type checks at compile time (as well as the intellisense if you use a tool like Visual Studio)

export function o<T>(someObject: T, defaultValue: T = {} as T) : T {
    if (typeof someObject === 'undefined' || someObject === null)
        return defaultValue;
    else
        return someObject;
}

the usage is the same:

o(o(o(o(test).level1).level2).level3

but this time intellisense works!

plus, you can set a default value:

o(o(o(o(o(test).level1).level2).level3, "none")
  • °0o <°(())))>< – Daniel W. Nov 17 '16 at 14:23
  • 1
    I like this one, because it is honest and throws an "undefined" in your face when you don't know your Object type. +1. – user10675354 Jan 8 at 12:40
  • 1
    As long as you keep the statement in parens you can also call it happy clown technique (o – Sventies Jan 22 at 14:06
  • Thanks Sventies. I love your comment . It is quite nice angle to look from - such conditions are mostly used in "ifs" and always surrounded with external brackets. So, yes, it is mostly a happy clown indeed :))) – VeganHunter Jan 22 at 22:38
9

I tried a recursive approach:

function objHasKeys(obj, keys) {
  var next = keys.shift();
  return obj[next] && (! keys.length || objHasKeys(obj[next], keys));
}

The ! keys.length || kicks out of the recursion so it doesn't run the function with no keys left to test. Tests:

obj = {
  path: {
    to: {
      the: {
        goodKey: "hello"
      }
    }
  }
}

console.log(objHasKeys(obj, ['path', 'to', 'the', 'goodKey'])); // true
console.log(objHasKeys(obj, ['path', 'to', 'the', 'badKey']));  // undefined

I am using it to print a friendly html view of a bunch of objects with unknown key/values, e.g.:

var biosName = objHasKeys(myObj, 'MachineInfo:BiosInfo:Name'.split(':'))
             ? myObj.MachineInfo.BiosInfo.Name
             : 'unknown';
6

One simple way is this:

try {
    alert(test.level1.level2.level3);
} catch(e) {
    alert("undefined");    // this is optional to put any output here
}

The try/catch catches the cases for when any of the higher level objects such as test, test.level1, test.level1.level2 are not defined.

6

I didn't see any example of someone using Proxies

So I came up with my own. The great thing about it is that you don't have to interpolate strings. You can actually return a chain-able object function and do some magical things with it. You can even call functions and get array indexes to check for deep objects

function resolve(target) {
  var noop = () => {} // We us a noop function so we can call methods also
  return new Proxy(noop, {
    get(noop, key) {
      // return end result if key is _result
      return key === '_result' 
        ? target 
        : resolve( // resolve with target value or undefined
            target === undefined ? undefined : target[key]
          )
    },

    // if we want to test a function then we can do so alos thanks to using noop
    // instead of using target in our proxy
    apply(noop, that, args) {
      return resolve(typeof target === 'function' ? target.apply(that, args) : undefined)
    },
  })
}

// some modified examples from the accepted answer
var test = {level1: {level2:() => ({level3:'level3'})}}
var test1 = {key1: {key2: ['item0']}}

// You need to get _result in the end to get the final result

console.log(resolve(test).level1.level2().level3._result)
console.log(resolve(test).level1.level2().level3.level4.level5._result)
console.log(resolve(test1).key1.key2[0]._result)
console.log(resolve(test1)[0].key._result) // don't exist

The above code works fine for synchronous stuff. But how would you test something that is asynchronous like this ajax call? How do you test that? what if the response isn't json when it returns a 500 http error?

window.fetch('https://httpbin.org/get')
.then(function(response) {
  return response.json()
})
.then(function(json) {
  console.log(json.headers['User-Agent'])
})

sure you could use async/await to get rid of some callbacks. But what if you could do it even more magically? something that looks like this:

fetch('https://httpbin.org/get').json().headers['User-Agent']

You probably wonder where all the promise & .then chains are... this could be blocking for all that you know... but using the same Proxy technique with promise you can actually test deeply nested complex path for it existence without ever writing a single function

function resolve(target) { 
  return new Proxy(() => {}, {
    get(noop, key) {
      return key === 'then' ? target.then.bind(target) : resolve(
        Promise.resolve(target).then(target => {
          if (typeof target[key] === 'function') return target[key].bind(target)
          return target[key]
        })
      )
    },

    apply(noop, that, args) {
      return resolve(target.then(result => {
        return result.apply(that, args)
      }))
    },
  })
}

// this feels very much synchronous but are still non blocking :)
resolve(window) // this will chain a noop function until you call then()
  .fetch('https://httpbin.org/get')
  .json()
  .headers['User-Agent']
  .then(console.log, console.warn) // you get a warning if it doesn't exist
  
// You could use this method also for the first test object
// also, but it would have to call .then() in the end



// Another example
resolve(window)
  .fetch('https://httpbin.org/get?items=4&items=2')
  .json()
  .args
  .items
  // nice that you can map an array item without even having it ready
  .map(n => ~~n * 4) 
  .then(console.log, console.warn) // you get a warning if it doesn't exist

  • If someone is interested, I've publish the async version on npm – Endless Sep 4 '17 at 12:09
5

Based on this answer, I came up with this generic function using ES2015 which would solve the problem

function validChain( object, ...keys ) {
    return keys.reduce( ( a, b ) => ( a || { } )[ b ], object ) !== undefined;
}

var test = {
  first: {
    second: {
        third: "This is not the key your are looking for"
    }
  }
}

if ( validChain( test, "first", "second", "third" ) ) {
    console.log( test.first.second.third );
}
  • 1
    Here is my final approach function validChain (object, path) { return path.split('.').reduce((a, b) => (a || { })[b], object) !== undefined } – James Harrington Nov 10 '17 at 21:45
4

A shorter, ES5 version of @CMS's excellent answer:

// Check the obj has the keys in the order mentioned. Used for checking JSON results.  
var checkObjHasKeys = function(obj, keys) {
  var success = true;
  keys.forEach( function(key) {
    if ( ! obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      success = false;
    }
    obj = obj[key];
  })
  return success;
}

With a similar test:

var test = { level1:{level2:{level3:'result'}}};
utils.checkObjHasKeys(test, ['level1', 'level2', 'level3']); // true
utils.checkObjHasKeys(test, ['level1', 'level2', 'foo']); // false
  • the only issue with this is if there are multiple levels of undefined keys, then you get a TypeError, e.g. checkObjHasKeys(test, ['level1', 'level2', 'asdf', 'asdf']); – JKS Jul 19 '12 at 17:34
  • 1
    A more suitable method is every, whose value can be returned directly. – RobG Aug 12 '15 at 11:59
  • Maybe change success = false; to return false. You should bail out once you know it breaks, nothing deeper can exist once it's null or undefined. This would prevent the errors on the deeper nested items, since they obviously don't exist either. – Wade Nov 4 '16 at 20:16
4

I have created a little function to get nested object properties safely.

function getValue(object, path, fallback, fallbackOnFalsy) {
    if (!object || !path) {
        return fallback;
    }

    // Reduces object properties to the deepest property in the path argument.
    return path.split('.').reduce((object, property) => {
       if (object && typeof object !== 'string' && object.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
            // The property is found but it may be falsy.
            // If fallback is active for falsy values, the fallback is returned, otherwise the property value.
            return !object[property] && fallbackOnFalsy ? fallback : object[property];
        } else {
            // Returns the fallback if current chain link does not exist or it does not contain the property.
            return fallback;
        }
    }, object);
}

Or a simpler but slightly unreadable version:

function getValue(o, path, fb, fbFalsy) {
   if(!o || !path) return fb;
   return path.split('.').reduce((o, p) => o && typeof o !== 'string' && o.hasOwnProperty(p) ? !o[p] && fbFalsy ? fb : o[p] : fb, o);
}

Or even shorter but without fallback on falsy flag:

function getValue(o, path, fb) {
   if(!o || !path) return fb;
   return path.split('.').reduce((o, p) => o && typeof o !== 'string' && o.hasOwnProperty(p) ? o[p] : fb, o);
}

I have test with:

const obj = {
    c: {
        a: 2,
        b: {
            c: [1, 2, 3, {a: 15, b: 10}, 15]
        },
        c: undefined,
        d: null
    },
    d: ''
}

And here are some tests:

// null
console.log(getValue(obj, 'c.d', 'fallback'));

// array
console.log(getValue(obj, 'c.b.c', 'fallback'));

// array index 2
console.log(getValue(obj, 'c.b.c.2', 'fallback'));

// no index => fallback
console.log(getValue(obj, 'c.b.c.10', 'fallback'));

To see all the code with documentation and the tests I've tried you can check my github gist: https://gist.github.com/vsambor/3df9ad75ff3de489bbcb7b8c60beebf4#file-javascriptgetnestedvalues-js

3

The answer given by CMS works fine with the following modification for null checks as well

function checkNested(obj /*, level1, level2, ... levelN*/) 
      {
             var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments),
             obj = args.shift();

            for (var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) 
            {
                if (obj == null || !obj.hasOwnProperty(args[i]) ) 
                {
                    return false;
                }
                obj = obj[args[i]];
            }
            return true;
    }
3

Following options were elaborated starting from this answer. Same tree for both :

var o = { a: { b: { c: 1 } } };

Stop searching when undefined

var u = undefined;
o.a ? o.a.b ? o.a.b.c : u : u // 1
o.x ? o.x.y ? o.x.y.z : u : u // undefined
(o = o.a) ? (o = o.b) ? o.c : u : u // 1

Ensure each level one by one

var $ = function (empty) {
    return function (node) {
        return node || empty;
    };
}({});

$($(o.a).b).c // 1
$($(o.x).y).z // undefined
3

I know this question is old, but I wanted to offer an extension by adding this to all objects. I know people tend to frown on using the Object prototype for extended object functionality, but I don't find anything easier than doing this. Plus, it's now allowed for with the Object.defineProperty method.

Object.defineProperty( Object.prototype, "has", { value: function( needle ) {
    var obj = this;
    var needles = needle.split( "." );
    for( var i = 0; i<needles.length; i++ ) {
        if( !obj.hasOwnProperty(needles[i])) {
            return false;
        }
        obj = obj[needles[i]];
    }
    return true;
}});

Now, in order to test for any property in any object you can simply do:

if( obj.has("some.deep.nested.object.somewhere") )

Here's a jsfiddle to test it out, and in particular it includes some jQuery that breaks if you modify the Object.prototype directly because of the property becoming enumerable. This should work fine with 3rd party libraries.

  • This won't work with array access ([0]) – Royi Namir Oct 2 '15 at 15:15
3

I think this is a slight improvement (becomes a 1-liner):

   alert( test.level1 && test.level1.level2 && test.level1.level2.level3 )

This works because the && operator returns the final operand it evaluated (and it short-circuits).

3

I was looking for the value to be returned if the property exists, so I modified the answer by CMS above. Here's what I came up with:

function getNestedProperty(obj, key) {
  // Get property array from key string
  var properties = key.split(".");

  // Iterate through properties, returning undefined if object is null or property doesn't exist
  for (var i = 0; i < properties.length; i++) {
    if (!obj || !obj.hasOwnProperty(properties[i])) {
      return;
    }
    obj = obj[properties[i]];
  }

  // Nested property found, so return the value
  return obj;
}


Usage:

getNestedProperty(test, "level1.level2.level3") // "level3"
getNestedProperty(test, "level1.level2.foo") // undefined

3

This works with all objects and arrays :)

ex:

if( obj._has( "something.['deep']['under'][1][0].item" ) ) {
    //do something
}

this is my improved version of Brian's answer

I used _has as the property name because it can conflict with existing has property (ex: maps)

Object.defineProperty( Object.prototype, "_has", { value: function( needle ) {
var obj = this;
var needles = needle.split( "." );
var needles_full=[];
var needles_square;
for( var i = 0; i<needles.length; i++ ) {
    needles_square = needles[i].split( "[" );
    if(needles_square.length>1){
        for( var j = 0; j<needles_square.length; j++ ) {
            if(needles_square[j].length){
                needles_full.push(needles_square[j]);
            }
        }
    }else{
        needles_full.push(needles[i]);
    }
}
for( var i = 0; i<needles_full.length; i++ ) {
    var res = needles_full[i].match(/^((\d+)|"(.+)"|'(.+)')\]$/);
    if (res != null) {
        for (var j = 0; j < res.length; j++) {
            if (res[j] != undefined) {
                needles_full[i] = res[j];
            }
        }
    }

    if( typeof obj[needles_full[i]]=='undefined') {
        return false;
    }
    obj = obj[needles_full[i]];
}
return true;
}});

Here's the fiddle

3

Here's my take on it - most of these solutions ignore the case of a nested array as in:

    obj = {
        "l1":"something",
        "l2":[{k:0},{k:1}],
        "l3":{
            "subL":"hello"
        }
    }

I may want to check for obj.l2[0].k

With the function below, you can do deeptest('l2[0].k',obj)

The function will return true if the object exists, false otherwise

function deeptest(keyPath, testObj) {
    var obj;

    keyPath = keyPath.split('.')
    var cKey = keyPath.shift();

    function get(pObj, pKey) {
        var bracketStart, bracketEnd, o;

        bracketStart = pKey.indexOf("[");
        if (bracketStart > -1) { //check for nested arrays
            bracketEnd = pKey.indexOf("]");
            var arrIndex = pKey.substr(bracketStart + 1, bracketEnd - bracketStart - 1);
            pKey = pKey.substr(0, bracketStart);
			var n = pObj[pKey];
            o = n? n[arrIndex] : undefined;

        } else {
            o = pObj[pKey];
        }
        return o;
    }

    obj = get(testObj, cKey);
    while (obj && keyPath.length) {
        obj = get(obj, keyPath.shift());
    }
    return typeof(obj) !== 'undefined';
}

var obj = {
    "l1":"level1",
    "arr1":[
        {"k":0},
        {"k":1},
        {"k":2}
    ],
    "sub": {
       	"a":"letter A",
        "b":"letter B"
    }
};
console.log("l1: " + deeptest("l1",obj));
console.log("arr1[0]: " + deeptest("arr1[0]",obj));
console.log("arr1[1].k: " + deeptest("arr1[1].k",obj));
console.log("arr1[1].j: " + deeptest("arr1[1].j",obj));
console.log("arr1[3]: " + deeptest("arr1[3]",obj));
console.log("arr2: " + deeptest("arr2",obj));

3

Now we can also use reduce to loop through nested keys:

// @params o<object>
// @params path<string> expects 'obj.prop1.prop2.prop3'
// returns: obj[path] value or 'false' if prop doesn't exist

const objPropIfExists = o => path => {
  const levels = path.split('.');
  const res = (levels.length > 0) 
    ? levels.reduce((a, c) => a[c] || 0, o)
    : o[path];
  return (!!res) ? res : false
}

const obj = {
  name: 'Name',
  sys: { country: 'AU' },
  main: { temp: '34', temp_min: '13' },
  visibility: '35%'
}

const exists = objPropIfExists(obj)('main.temp')
const doesntExist = objPropIfExists(obj)('main.temp.foo.bar.baz')

console.log(exists, doesntExist)

3

You can do this by using the recursive function. This will work even if you don't know all nested Object keys name.

function FetchKeys(obj) {
    let objKeys = [];
    let keyValues = Object.entries(obj);
    for (let i in keyValues) {
        objKeys.push(keyValues[i][0]);
        if (typeof keyValues[i][1] == "object") {
            var keys = FetchKeys(keyValues[i][1])
            objKeys = objKeys.concat(keys);
        }
    }
    return objKeys;
}

let test = { level1: { level2: { level3: "level3" } } };
let keyToCheck = "level2";
let keys = FetchKeys(test); //Will return an array of Keys

if (keys.indexOf(keyToCheck) != -1) {
    //Key Exists logic;
}
else {
    //Key Not Found logic;
}
2

theres a function here on thecodeabode (safeRead) which will do this in a safe manner... i.e.

safeRead(test, 'level1', 'level2', 'level3');

if any property is null or undefined, an empty string is returned

  • I kind of like this method with templating because it returns an empty string if not set – Lounge9 Jan 21 '16 at 19:26
2

Based on a previous comment, here is another version where the main object could not be defined either:

// Supposing that our property is at first.second.third.property:
var property = (((typeof first !== 'undefined' ? first : {}).second || {}).third || {}).property;
2

I wrote my own function that takes the desired path, and has a good and bad callback function.

function checkForPathInObject(object, path, callbackGood, callbackBad){
    var pathParts = path.split(".");
    var currentObjectPath = object;

    // Test every step to see if it exists in object
    for(var i=0; i<(pathParts.length); i++){
        var currentPathPart = pathParts[i];
        if(!currentObjectPath.hasOwnProperty(pathParts[i])){
            if(callbackBad){
                callbackBad();
            }
            return false;
        } else {
            currentObjectPath = currentObjectPath[pathParts[i]];
        }
    }

    // call full path in callback
    callbackGood();
}

Usage:

var testObject = {
    level1:{
        level2:{
            level3:{
            }
        }
    }
};


checkForPathInObject(testObject, "level1.level2.level3", function(){alert("good!")}, function(){alert("bad!")}); // good

checkForPathInObject(testObject, "level1.level2.level3.levelNotThere", function(){alert("good!")}, function(){alert("bad!")}); //bad
  • I though fair to give you credit for the inspiration to adapt your code to my answer – davewoodhall Jun 2 '16 at 20:02
2
//Just in case is not supported or not included by your framework
//***************************************************
Array.prototype.some = function(fn, thisObj) {
  var scope = thisObj || window;
  for ( var i=0, j=this.length; i < j; ++i ) {
    if ( fn.call(scope, this[i], i, this) ) {
      return true;
    }
  }
  return false;
};
//****************************************************

function isSet (object, string) {
  if (!object) return false;
  var childs = string.split('.');
  if (childs.length > 0 ) {
    return !childs.some(function (item) {
      if (item in object) {
        object = object[item]; 
        return false;
      } else return true;
    });
  } else if (string in object) { 
    return true;
  } else return false;
}

var object = {
  data: {
    item: {
      sub_item: {
        bla: {
          here : {
            iam: true
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
};

console.log(isSet(object,'data.item')); // true
console.log(isSet(object,'x')); // false
console.log(isSet(object,'data.sub_item')); // false
console.log(isSet(object,'data.item')); // true
console.log(isSet(object,'data.item.sub_item.bla.here.iam')); // true
2

I was having the same issue and and wanted to see if I could come up with a my own solution. This accepts the path you want to check as a string.

function checkPathForTruthy(obj, path) {
  if (/\[[a-zA-Z_]/.test(path)) {
    console.log("Cannot resolve variables in property accessors");
    return false;
  }

  path = path.replace(/\[/g, ".");
  path = path.replace(/]|'|"/g, "");
  path = path.split(".");

  var steps = 0;
  var lastRef = obj;
  var exists = path.every(key => {
    var currentItem = lastRef[path[steps]];
    if (currentItem) {
      lastRef = currentItem;
      steps++;
      return true;
    } else {
      return false;
    }
  });

  return exists;
}

Here is a snippet with some logging and test cases:

console.clear();
var testCases = [
  ["data.Messages[0].Code", true],
  ["data.Messages[1].Code", true],
  ["data.Messages[0]['Code']", true],
  ['data.Messages[0]["Code"]', true],
  ["data[Messages][0]['Code']", false],
  ["data['Messages'][0]['Code']", true]
];
var path = "data.Messages[0].Code";
var obj = {
  data: {
    Messages: [{
      Code: "0"
    }, {
      Code: "1"
    }]
  }
}

function checkPathForTruthy(obj, path) {
  if (/\[[a-zA-Z_]/.test(path)) {
    console.log("Cannot resolve variables in property accessors");
    return false;
  }

  path = path.replace(/\[/g, ".");
  path = path.replace(/]|'|"/g, "");
  path = path.split(".");

  var steps = 0;
  var lastRef = obj;
  var logOutput = [];
  var exists = path.every(key => {
    var currentItem = lastRef[path[steps]];
    if (currentItem) {
      logOutput.push(currentItem);
      lastRef = currentItem;
      steps++;
      return true;
    } else {
      return false;
    }
  });
  console.log(exists, logOutput);
  return exists;
}

testCases.forEach(testCase => {
  if (checkPathForTruthy(obj, testCase[0]) === testCase[1]) {
    console.log("Passed: " + testCase[0]);
  } else {
    console.log("Failed: " + testCase[0] + " expected " + testCase[1]);
  }
});

protected by Jack Bashford Apr 30 at 2:51

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