44

I need to implement a function to run after 60 seconds of clicking a button. Please help, I used the Timer class, but I think that that is not the best way.

21

"I used the Timer class, but I think that that is not the best way."

The other answers assume you are not using Swing for your user interface (button).

If you are using Swing then do not use Thread.sleep() as it will freeze your Swing application.

Instead you should use a javax.swing.Timer.

See the Java tutorial How to Use Swing Timers and Lesson: Concurrency in Swing for more information and examples.

  • 1
    even though this is the accepted answer it is woefully outdated, especially since the advent of java 9. See the answer below about the delayedExecutor – Jewels Mar 5 '19 at 13:10
41

Asynchronous implementation with JDK 1.8:

public static void setTimeout(Runnable runnable, int delay){
    new Thread(() -> {
        try {
            Thread.sleep(delay);
            runnable.run();
        }
        catch (Exception e){
            System.err.println(e);
        }
    }).start();
}

To call with lambda expression:

setTimeout(() -> System.out.println("test"), 1000);

Or with method reference:

setTimeout(anInstance::aMethod, 1000);

To deal with the current running thread only use a synchronous version:

public static void setTimeoutSync(Runnable runnable, int delay) {
    try {
        Thread.sleep(delay);
        runnable.run();
    }
    catch (Exception e){
        System.err.println(e);
    }
}

Use this with caution in main thread – it will suspend everything after the call until timeout expires and runnable executes.

  • 1
    yeah don't do it this way - it will start too many threads, I think the CompletableFuture technique is better – Alexander Mills Feb 4 '19 at 23:56
  • CompletableFuture still creates a new Thread. See CompletableFuture.java#2745. – Oleg Mikhailov Feb 6 '19 at 8:15
  • huh, is there a way to tell CompletableFuture to use a threadpool instead of creating a new thread each time? or does it already do that? – Alexander Mills Feb 6 '19 at 8:29
  • Even Java's built-in Timer class starts "too many threads": "A facility for threads to schedule tasks for future execution in a background thread." I think this way is actually pretty clean. It doesn't handle the repeat-execution case, but you could always have your task just call settimeout again at the end. – Pavel Komarov Oct 23 '19 at 20:01
15

Use Java 9 CompletableFuture, every simple:

CompletableFuture.delayedExecutor(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS).execute(() -> {
  // Your code here executes after 5 seconds!
});
  • 1
    Snippet not working it shows the error: The method delayedExecutor(int, TimeUnit) is undefined for the type CompletableFuture – Ashish Nov 26 '18 at 9:33
  • 1
    I think I made a mistake, it's for Java 9, not Java 8. Use Java 9 and everything is fine. – user1079877 Nov 27 '18 at 17:20
  • for anyone working with java 9 and up this should be the accepted answer – Jewels Mar 5 '19 at 13:09
6

You can simply use Thread.sleep() for this purpose. But if you are working in a multithreaded environment with a user interface, you would want to perform this in the separate thread to avoid the sleep to block the user interface.

try{
    Thread.sleep(60000);
    // Then do something meaningful...
}catch(InterruptedException e){
    e.printStackTrace();
}
5

Do not use Thread.sleep or it will freeze your main thread and not simulate setTimeout from JS. You need to create and start a new background thread to run your code without stoping the execution of the main thread. Like this:

new Thread() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        try {
            this.sleep(3000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }


        // your code here

    }
}.start();
3
public ScheduledExecutorService = ses;
ses.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable(){
    run(){
            //running after specified time
}
}, 60, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

its run after 60 seconds from scheduleAtFixedRate https://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/ScheduledExecutorService.html

  • Can you share how your solution is better than the others? And please also explain what your solution is doing rather than just pasting a piece of code. – Noel Widmer Jun 4 '17 at 12:19
  • the code creatore was not me. its oracle. better than me , their must explain. pleade refer to this link and read doc.docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… – babak Jun 4 '17 at 16:33
1

You should use Thread.sleep() method.

try {

    Thread.sleep(60000);
    callTheFunctionYouWantTo();
} catch(InterruptedException ex) {

}

This will wait for 60,000 milliseconds(60 seconds) and then execute the next statements in your code.

1

There is setTimeout() method in underscore-java library.

Code example:

import com.github.underscore.U;
import com.github.underscore.Function;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        final Integer[] counter = new Integer[] {0};
        Function<Void> incr = new Function<Void>() { public Void apply() {
            counter[0]++; return null; } };
        U.setTimeout(incr, 100);
    }
}

The function will be started in 100ms with a new thread.

  • 3
    It is definitely inappropriate to use any sort of "sleep" (on the main or active thread) to do this sort of thing. (Nor does it call for the use of a thread.) Some sort of timeout, as suggested here, is definitely called-for. Also: in the timeout-handler, be sure that you verify that the condition-of-interest still exists! (Even if you "delete the timeout" when the condition no longer exists, there is still a miniscule timing-hole left that you cannot completely eliminate.) – Mike Robinson Apr 25 '16 at 14:52
1

Using the java.util.Timer:

new Timer().schedule(new TimerTask() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // here goes your code to delay
    }
}, 300L); // 300 is the delay in millis

Here you can find some info and examples.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.