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I have a general question regarding casting between base value types when a mathematical operation is used. Are there any written rules in the Microsoft C# specs? I couldn't find them. Does it work the same in Mono?

Example:

double a = 1 / 1234;                    //Result is 0
double b = 1.0 / 1234;                  //Result is 0,000810372771474878
double c = 1.0 / (double)1234;          //Result is 0,000810372771474878
double d = (double)1 / (double)1234;    //Result is 0,000810372771474878
double e = 1 / 1234.0;                  //Result is 0,000810372771474878

Can I assume that the result is always a double when dividend or divisor are doubles? Or for some reason is it better to ensure both are doubles (see case d - I have seen many of such code which actually make me ask this question)

Regards, Sebastian

4

Long story short, yes, it is safe to assume that the compiler will assume double when at least one side of a binary operation is typed as that. You do not need to be explicit (although of course there are times when it might be useful from a readability standpoint, which isn't really relevant but it bears mention).

And just to be clear, although I don't think you've got this confused in your original question, but the type of variable to which you assign the result has no effect on how the division operator overload is determined.

Your top case simply utilizes an implicit conversion, which would have the explicit equivalent of this.

double a = (double)(1 / 1234);

The fact that you assign it to a double does not effect the fact that 1 / 1234 evaluates, as you've found, to 0, because that cast occurs post-facto to the division. If we cut a hole in space-time here, this example would fall to the very last case of the list at the bottom of this post, where two integers are divided. Thus, as per section 7.8.2 of the spec, this will return the floor of the quotient, or 0.


This behavior is described in section 7.3.6 of the C# 5 spec (it took a bit of looking, I'll admit), with emphasis mine.

7.3.6 Numeric promotions

...

When overload resolution rules (§7.5.3) are applied to this set of operators, the effect is to select the first of the operators for which implicit conversions exist from the operand types. For example, for the operation b * s, where b is a byte and s is a short, overload resolution selects operator *(int, int) as the best operator. Thus, the effect is that b and s are converted to int, and the type of the result is int. Likewise, for the operation i * d, where i is an int and d is a double, overload resolution selects operator *(double, double) as the best operator.

This, of course, applies not only to multiplication as its examples show, but any binary operation.

Just for good measure, the hierarchy is as follows, taken from 7.3.6.2, emphasis still mine.

• If either operand is of type decimal, the other operand is converted to type decimal, or a binding-time error occurs if the other operand is of type float or double.
Otherwise, if either operand is of type double, the other operand is converted to type double.
• Otherwise, if either operand is of type float, the other operand is converted to type float.
• Otherwise, if either operand is of type ulong, the other operand is converted to type ulong, or a binding-time error occurs if the other operand is of type sbyte, short, int, or long.
• Otherwise, if either operand is of type long, the other operand is converted to type long.
• Otherwise, if either operand is of type uint and the other operand is of type sbyte, short, or int, both operands are converted to type long.
• Otherwise, if either operand is of type uint, the other operand is converted to type uint.
• Otherwise, both operands are converted to type int.

In reality, the compiler actually performs that cast for you, by making the non-double operand into type double.

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When you divide two integer you get an integer result. since int can't hold 0,000810372771474878 the result will be truncated to 0 then 0 (int) is converted to double and you get 0.0 as result.

In order to get floating point result one of the operands should be a floating point type.In that case the integer operand will be converted into double/float or decimal, depending on the type of your number.

There is detailed information about division operators in C# Specification 7.7.2 Division operator

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