8

I'm working on a file synchronization service to synchronize files between two folders on different machines. I need to find a very fast way to enumerate a directory and pull the following information from it:

  • A data structure or structures of all file paths and sub-directory paths within this directory, which includes the last write time for each file or sub-directory.
  • For each sub-directory that is found at any level below the current directory, the same as above.

So far, I have come up with this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> files = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directories = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
    while (true)
    {
        watch.Start();
        while (!CheckFolderRecursiveSingleThreaded("C:\\", out files, out directories))
        {
            // You can assume for all intents and purposes that drive C does exist and that you have access to it, which will cause this sleep to not get called.
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine(watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        watch.Reset();
        // Do something with the information.
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
}

static bool CheckFolderRecursiveSingleThreaded(string path, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> files, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directories)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryInfo directoryInformation = new DirectoryInfo(path);
        List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> fileList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
        foreach (FileInfo file in directoryInformation.GetFiles())
        {
            fileList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(file.FullName, file.LastWriteTimeUtc));
        }
        List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
        foreach (DirectoryInfo directory in directoryInformation.GetDirectories())
        {
            // Check for the ReparsePoint flag, which will indicate a symbolic link.
            if (!directory.Attributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.ReparsePoint))
            {
                directoryList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(directory.FullName, directory.LastWriteTimeUtc));
                List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryFiles;
                List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryFolders;
                if (CheckFolderRecursiveSingleThreaded(directory.FullName, out directoryFiles, out directoryFolders))
                {
                    fileList.AddRange(directoryFiles);
                    directoryList.AddRange(directoryFolders);
                }
            }
        }
        files = fileList;
        directories = directoryList;
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        files = null;
        directories = null;
        return false;
    }
}

Performance-wise, it takes about 22 seconds (regardless of running in release or debug mode without the debugger attached) to enumerate through my C:\ drive and produce a list of about 549,254 files and 83,235 folders it has access to, but can it be faster? I am open to any suggestions, even MSVC++ suggestions.

Edit: 12 seconds with LINQ's AsParallel because of multithreading (must be tested in Release mode). Note that this parallelizes for all C:\ sub-folders, but recursive calls will be made to the single-threaded implementation I have above, otherwise it would take a REALLY long time to parallelize for all folders all the time!

static bool CheckFolderParallelled(string path, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> files, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directories)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryInfo directoryInformation = new DirectoryInfo(path);
        List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> fileList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
        foreach (FileInfo file in directoryInformation.GetFiles())
        {
            fileList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(file.FullName, file.LastWriteTimeUtc));
        }
        List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
        directoryInformation.GetDirectories().AsParallel().ForAll(directory =>
        {
            // Check for the ReparsePoint flag, which will indicate a symbolic link.
            if (!directory.Attributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.ReparsePoint))
            {
                directoryList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(directory.FullName, directory.LastWriteTimeUtc));
                List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryFiles;
                List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryFolders;
                if (CheckFolderRecursiveSingleThreaded(directory.FullName, out directoryFiles, out directoryFolders))
                {
                    fileList.AddRange(directoryFiles);
                    directoryList.AddRange(directoryFolders);
                }
            }
        });
        files = fileList;
        directories = directoryList;
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        files = null;
        directories = null;
        return false;
    }
}

Edit: Still about 21 seconds using Alexei's linked solution's accepted answer from Mark Gravell. This non-recursive technique is not the fastest (probably the cost of keeping this Queue datatype alive is just as expensive as the cost of pushing and popping calls to this method on the stack):

static bool CheckFolderNonRecursive(string path, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> files, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directories)
{
    try
    {
        List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> fileList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
        List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
        ConcurrentQueue<DirectoryInfo> pendingSearches = new ConcurrentQueue<DirectoryInfo>();
        pendingSearches.Enqueue(new DirectoryInfo(path));
        DirectoryInfo pendingDirectory;
        while (pendingSearches.Count > 0)
        {
            if (pendingSearches.TryDequeue(out pendingDirectory))
            {
                try
                {
                    foreach (FileInfo file in pendingDirectory.GetFiles())
                    {
                        fileList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(file.FullName, file.LastWriteTimeUtc));
                    }
                    foreach (DirectoryInfo directory in pendingDirectory.GetDirectories())
                    {
                        // Check for the ReparsePoint flag, which will indicate a symbolic link.
                        if (!directory.Attributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.ReparsePoint))
                        {
                            directoryList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(directory.FullName, directory.LastWriteTimeUtc));
                            pendingSearches.Enqueue(directory);
                        }
                    }
                }
                catch { } // Ignore directories with no access rights.
            }
        }
        files = fileList;
        directories = directoryList;
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        files = null;
        directories = null;
        return false;
    }
}

Edit: This question is open-ended towards .NET, because there may be a faster way with MSVC++ libraries like boost, but I have yet to come across a faster method. If anyone can beat my C# method with a faster C drive enumerator in C++ that pulls the same data, first of all kudos to you for doing it faster, second of all I would be really interested to see it, third of all it would help a lot of people out (not just myself). I got this far into boost until I realized the following method took around 200,000 ms, much, much longer than any code I've posted above:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <Windows.h>
#include <boost/filesystem.hpp>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/timer.hpp>

namespace fs = boost::filesystem;

bool IterateDirectory(const wchar_t *directory);

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    boost::timer timer = boost::timer();
    while (true)
    {
        timer.restart();
        // L makes it wide, since IterateDirectory takes wchar_t.
        // R makes it a raw string literal, which tells the compiler to parse the string as-is, not escape characters and fancy tricks.
        IterateDirectory(LR"(C:\)");
        std::cout << "Elapsed time: " << timer.elapsed() * 1000 << " ms" << std::endl;
        Sleep(1000);
    }
    return 0;
}

// IterateDirectory takes wchar_t because path.c_str() always returns wchar_t whether you are using unicode or multibyte.
bool IterateDirectory(const wchar_t *directory)
{
    if (boost::filesystem::exists(directory))
    {
        fs::directory_iterator it(directory), eod;
        BOOST_FOREACH(fs::path path, std::make_pair(it, eod))
        {
            try
            {
                if (is_regular_file(path))
                {
                    //std::cout << path << ", last write time: " << last_write_time(path) << '.' << std::endl;
                }
                if (is_directory(path))
                {
                    //std::cout << path << ", last write time: " << last_write_time(path) << '.' << std::endl;
                    // path.c_str() always returns wchar_t, whether you are using unicode or multibyte. This is probably because of multi-language support inside of the Windows operating system and file structure.
                    IterateDirectory(path.c_str());
                }
            }
            catch (...) { } // Ignore directories we don't have access to.
        }
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Edit: Using PInvoke to FindFirstFile and FindNextFile took about 6 seconds to iterate my entire C drive (thanks to the duplicate link and Sam Saffron's answer). But...can it be faster?

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = true)]
public static extern IntPtr FindFirstFileW(string lpFileName, out WIN32_FIND_DATAW lpFindFileData);

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
public static extern bool FindNextFile(IntPtr hFindFile, out WIN32_FIND_DATAW lpFindFileData);

[DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
public static extern bool FindClose(IntPtr hFindFile);

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
public struct WIN32_FIND_DATAW {
    public FileAttributes dwFileAttributes;
    internal System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftCreationTime;
    internal System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftLastAccessTime;
    internal System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftLastWriteTime;
    public int nFileSizeHigh;
    public int nFileSizeLow;
    public int dwReserved0;
    public int dwReserved1;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 260)]
    public string cFileName;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 14)]
    public string cAlternateFileName;
}

static IntPtr INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE = new IntPtr(-1);

static bool FindNextFilePInvokeRecursive(string path, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> files, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directories)
{
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> fileList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    WIN32_FIND_DATAW findData;
    IntPtr findHandle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> info = new List<Tuple<string,DateTime>>();
    try
    {
        findHandle = FindFirstFileW(path + @"\*", out findData);
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            do
            {
                if (findData.cFileName == "." || findData.cFileName == "..") continue;
                string fullPath = path + (path.EndsWith("\\") ? String.Empty : "\\") + findData.cFileName;
                // Check if this is a directory and not a symbolic link since symbolic links could lead to repeated files and folders as well as infinite loops.
                if (findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory) && !findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.ReparsePoint))
                {
                    directoryList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(fullPath, findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime()));
                    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> subDirectoryFileList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
                    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> subDirectoryDirectoryList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
                    if (FindNextFilePInvokeRecursive(fullPath, out subDirectoryFileList, out subDirectoryDirectoryList))
                    {
                        fileList.AddRange(subDirectoryFileList);
                        directoryList.AddRange(subDirectoryDirectoryList);
                    }
                }
                else if (!findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory))
                {
                    fileList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(fullPath, findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime()));
                }
            }
            while (FindNextFile(findHandle, out findData));
        }
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Caught exception while trying to enumerate a directory. {0}", exception.ToString());
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
        files = null;
        directories = null;
        return false;
    }
    if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
    files = fileList;
    directories = directoryList;
    return true;
}

public static class FILETIMEExtensions
{
    public static DateTime ToDateTime(this System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME filetime)
    {
        long highBits = filetime.dwHighDateTime;
        highBits = highBits << 32;
        return DateTime.FromFileTimeUtc(highBits + (long)filetime.dwLowDateTime);
    }
}

Edit: Yes, it can be faster. Using techniques to parallelize the target folder's subdirectory recursions, I can get it to 4 seconds using the above FindNextFilePInvokeRecursive method. That's 4 seconds to iterate my entire C drive with the data I need. I can see in process monitor, I eat up about 30% CPU and only 1% disk at most, which is a little odd to me, not sure why that is at the moment, maybe just this linked list traversal style causes it to be pretty negligible. Ideally it should eat 100% CPU at least, but that might depend on the number and depth of subfolders you parallelize on. But can it be faster?!

static bool FindNextFilePInvokeRecursiveParalleled(string path, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> files, out List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directories)
{
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> fileList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> directoryList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    WIN32_FIND_DATAW findData;
    IntPtr findHandle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> info = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    try
    {
        findHandle = FindFirstFileW(path + @"\*", out findData);
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            do
            {
                if (findData.cFileName == "." || findData.cFileName == "..") continue;
                string fullPath = path + (path.EndsWith("\\") ? String.Empty : "\\") + findData.cFileName;
                // Check if this is a directory and not a symbolic link since symbolic links could lead to repeated files and folders as well as infinite loops.
                if (findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory) && !findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.ReparsePoint))
                {
                    directoryList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(fullPath, findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime()));
                }
                else if (!findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory))
                {
                    fileList.Add(new Tuple<string, DateTime>(fullPath, findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime()));
                }
            }
            while (FindNextFile(findHandle, out findData));
            directoryList.AsParallel().ForAll(x =>
            {
                List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> subDirectoryFileList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
                List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> subDirectoryDirectoryList = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
                if (FindNextFilePInvokeRecursive(x.Item1, out subDirectoryFileList, out subDirectoryDirectoryList))
                {
                    fileList.AddRange(subDirectoryFileList);
                    directoryList.AddRange(subDirectoryDirectoryList);
                }
            });
        }
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Caught exception while trying to enumerate a directory. {0}", exception.ToString());
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
        files = null;
        directories = null;
        return false;
    }
    if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
    files = fileList;
    directories = directoryList;
    return true;
}

Edit: Forgot to add concurrency locks when using parallels, otherwise you might catch an exception. Also removed tuples and went with a FileInformation/DirectoryInformation class for my purposes. This shaved off .5 seconds. Now 3.5 seconds to enumerate my C: drive.

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, SetLastError = true)]
public static extern IntPtr FindFirstFileW(string lpFileName, out WIN32_FIND_DATAW lpFindFileData);

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
public static extern bool FindNextFile(IntPtr hFindFile, out WIN32_FIND_DATAW lpFindFileData);

[DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
public static extern bool FindClose(IntPtr hFindFile);

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
public struct WIN32_FIND_DATAW {
    public FileAttributes dwFileAttributes;
    internal System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftCreationTime;
    internal System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftLastAccessTime;
    internal System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftLastWriteTime;
    public int nFileSizeHigh;
    public int nFileSizeLow;
    public int dwReserved0;
    public int dwReserved1;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 260)]
    public string cFileName;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 14)]
    public string cAlternateFileName;
}

static IntPtr INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE = new IntPtr(-1);

static bool FindNextFilePInvokeRecursive(string path, out List<FileInformation> files, out List<DirectoryInformation> directories)
{
    List<FileInformation> fileList = new List<FileInformation>();
    List<DirectoryInformation> directoryList = new List<DirectoryInformation>();
    WIN32_FIND_DATAW findData;
    IntPtr findHandle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> info = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    try
    {
        findHandle = FindFirstFileW(path + @"\*", out findData);
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            do
            {
                // Skip current directory and parent directory symbols that are returned.
                if (findData.cFileName != "." && findData.cFileName != "..")
                {
                    string fullPath = path + @"\" + findData.cFileName;
                    // Check if this is a directory and not a symbolic link since symbolic links could lead to repeated files and folders as well as infinite loops.
                    if (findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory) && !findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.ReparsePoint))
                    {
                        directoryList.Add(new DirectoryInformation { FullPath = fullPath, LastWriteTime = findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime() });
                        List<FileInformation> subDirectoryFileList = new List<FileInformation>();
                        List<DirectoryInformation> subDirectoryDirectoryList = new List<DirectoryInformation>();
                        if (FindNextFilePInvokeRecursive(fullPath, out subDirectoryFileList, out subDirectoryDirectoryList))
                        {
                            fileList.AddRange(subDirectoryFileList);
                            directoryList.AddRange(subDirectoryDirectoryList);
                        }
                    }
                    else if (!findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory))
                    {
                        fileList.Add(new FileInformation { FullPath = fullPath, LastWriteTime = findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime() });
                    }
                }
            }
            while (FindNextFile(findHandle, out findData));
        }
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Caught exception while trying to enumerate a directory. {0}", exception.ToString());
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
        files = null;
        directories = null;
        return false;
    }
    if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
    files = fileList;
    directories = directoryList;
    return true;
}

static bool FindNextFilePInvokeRecursiveParalleled(string path, out List<FileInformation> files, out List<DirectoryInformation> directories)
{
    List<FileInformation> fileList = new List<FileInformation>();
    object fileListLock = new object();
    List<DirectoryInformation> directoryList = new List<DirectoryInformation>();
    object directoryListLock = new object();
    WIN32_FIND_DATAW findData;
    IntPtr findHandle = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    List<Tuple<string, DateTime>> info = new List<Tuple<string, DateTime>>();
    try
    {
        path = path.EndsWith(@"\") ? path : path + @"\";
        findHandle = FindFirstFileW(path + @"*", out findData);
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            do
            {
                // Skip current directory and parent directory symbols that are returned.
                if (findData.cFileName != "." && findData.cFileName != "..")
                {
                    string fullPath = path + findData.cFileName;
                    // Check if this is a directory and not a symbolic link since symbolic links could lead to repeated files and folders as well as infinite loops.
                    if (findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory) && !findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.ReparsePoint))
                    {
                        directoryList.Add(new DirectoryInformation { FullPath = fullPath, LastWriteTime = findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime() });
                    }
                    else if (!findData.dwFileAttributes.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory))
                    {
                        fileList.Add(new FileInformation { FullPath = fullPath, LastWriteTime = findData.ftLastWriteTime.ToDateTime() });
                    }
                }
            }
            while (FindNextFile(findHandle, out findData));
            directoryList.AsParallel().ForAll(x =>
            {
                List<FileInformation> subDirectoryFileList = new List<FileInformation>();
                List<DirectoryInformation> subDirectoryDirectoryList = new List<DirectoryInformation>();
                if (FindNextFilePInvokeRecursive(x.FullPath, out subDirectoryFileList, out subDirectoryDirectoryList))
                {
                    lock (fileListLock)
                    {
                        fileList.AddRange(subDirectoryFileList);
                    }
                    lock (directoryListLock)
                    {
                        directoryList.AddRange(subDirectoryDirectoryList);
                    }
                }
            });
        }
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Caught exception while trying to enumerate a directory. {0}", exception.ToString());
        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
        files = null;
        directories = null;
        return false;
    }
    if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) FindClose(findHandle);
    files = fileList;
    directories = directoryList;
    return true;
}

public class FileInformation
{
    public string FullPath;
    public DateTime LastWriteTime;
}

public class DirectoryInformation
{
    public string FullPath;
    public DateTime LastWriteTime;
}

Edit: B.K. was asking about the conversion to DateTime from FILETIME:

public static class FILETIMEExtensions
{
    public static DateTime ToDateTime(this System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME time)
    {
        ulong high = (ulong)time.dwHighDateTime;
        ulong low = (ulong)time.dwLowDateTime;
        long fileTime = (long)((high << 32) + low);
        return DateTime.FromFileTimeUtc(fileTime);
    }
}
  • @AlexeiLevenkov I think that if I can increase speeds to be almost twice as fast by using LINQ's multithreading, then there can be a LOT more room for improvement, and I am nominating this question to be reopened, for the good of mankind. :) – Alexandru Oct 12 '14 at 5:08
  • @AlexeiLevenkov I don't think its a duplicate because I need to query for last write time instead of extension type. Take Mark Gravell's accepted solution in the question you've linked for example, it uses Directory.GetFiles or Directory.GetDirectories which return strings, not at all the data I need, and if you alter it to use a non-recursive based approach using <DirectoryInformationObject>.GetFiles/Direct, it takes about 22 seconds (still the same as my first, recursive implementation) in release mode probably because of having to keep the queue active and the cost of enqueuing/dequeueing. – Alexandru Oct 12 '14 at 22:00
  • @AlexeiLevenkov I updated the question. Also, I'm not sure if there is a misunderstanding here, but when I said I am trying to synchronize folders on two machines, I never said they were on the same network. In fact, the enumeration operation I am asking about will be done and then the idea was to have two WCF services compare files between the two machines. I'm just trying to make folder enumeration as fast as possible. – Alexandru Oct 12 '14 at 22:14
  • 1
    The duplicate I linked uses P/Invoke to call the Win32 FindFirstFile and FindNextFile functions. As far as I've been able to determine, this is the fastest way to get a directory. Using multiple threads won't speed getting information for a single drive. If there are multiple drives, you can use one thread per drive. – Jim Mischel Oct 12 '14 at 22:53
  • @JimMischel I will try this API in a bit and post my results. – Alexandru Oct 12 '14 at 22:58
2

use LINQ and Parallel Tasks

var stuff = dir.GetFiles("*.*", System.IO.SearchOption.AllDirectories);  
Parallel.ForEach(stuff, p=>{ //do things in parallel..  });

//or this 
var q = stuff.AsParallel().Where(x => p(x)).Orderby(x => k(x)).Select(x => f(x));       
foreach (var e in q) a(e);
  • And how LINQ will boost the performance ? – mybirthname Oct 12 '14 at 3:11
  • 1
    Good point... use Parallel.ForEach, but it will take the LINQ enumerables. In your case you are populating the Tuples. Don't need to do that. But adding a performance measurement tool is best to prove either solution. Finally, if you really need fast write the application in C++. – JWP Oct 12 '14 at 3:28
  • I'll try and see when I have time but there is a problem with this method: If you choose AllDirectories in your search and the directory structure contains a link (such as a symbolic link to another folder) that creates a loop, the search operation enters an infinite loop. – Alexandru Oct 12 '14 at 3:29
  • @user1522548 I tried C++ with boost's libraries but it turned out to be slower than the way I implemented it in the question. Maybe I missed something but if anyone knows of any fast C++ APIs, please let me know! PS I like that you mentioned using parallels, that is going to be a huge improvement! – Alexandru Oct 12 '14 at 3:31
  • Just a thought but, FileInfo seems to pull so much more data than anyone needs all at one time! That must be expensive in terms of reading the file system, but I may be wrong. I wonder why there isn't a simpler API to get only particulars that you need to work with instead of all that extra overhead. – Alexandru Oct 12 '14 at 3:35

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