The challenge

The shortest code by character count that will output the numeric equivalent of an Excel column string.

For example, the A column is 1, B is 2, so on and so forth. Once you hit Z, the next column becomes AA, then AB and so on.

Test cases:

A:    1
B:    2
AD:   30
ABC:  731
WTF:  16074
ROFL: 326676

Code count includes input/output (i.e full program).

locked by Shog9 Apr 3 '15 at 16:34

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  • 19
    Code golf is pointless, APL always wins in the end. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Apr 14 '10 at 3:09
  • 1
    When you post a solution, please make sure it works across all the cases above (input/output as run is nice), and note where it does not. Thanks. – user166390 Apr 16 '10 at 18:49
  • 3
    Why the hell is this tagged with rosetta-stone?! – Josh Stodola Apr 16 '10 at 19:59
  • 2
    J is APL without the Greek. J will always win, no one speaks APL anymore. – Callum Rogers Apr 16 '10 at 21:48
  • 1
    @BlueRaja: It's interesting that APL is still winning these things in 2010, almost 40 years after it left the mainstream. – Kragen Javier Sitaker Apr 16 '10 at 21:58

67 Answers 67

up vote 96 down vote accepted

Perl, 36 34 33 31 30 17 15 11 characters

$_=()=A..$_

Usage:

$ echo -n WTF | perl -ple '$_=()=A..$_'
16074

Reduced to 17 by using echo -n to avoid a chop call.

Reduced to 15 by using say instead of print.

Reduced to 11 by using -p instead of say.

Explanation: A is evaluated in string context and A..$_ builds a list starting at "A" and string-incrementing up to the input string. Perl interprets the ++ operator (and thus ..) on strings in an alphabetic context, so for example $_="AZ";$_++;print outputs BA.

=()= (aka "goatse" operator) forces an expression to be evaluated in list context, and returns the number of elements returned by that expression i.e., $scalar = () = <expr> corresponds to @list = <expr>; $scalar = @list.

  • 2
    Use $_ or $` instead of $n` and call print with no args. – mob Apr 14 '10 at 6:44
  • 4
    use "-p" and drop print altogether : echo -n WTF | perl -p -e '$_=()=A..$_' Total code : 11 characters, AH AH! – wazoox Apr 16 '10 at 13:27
  • 2
    switch print to say and drop another 2 characters :) – mpeters Apr 16 '10 at 14:38
  • 16
    Ah I love the goatse operator :) – Ether Apr 16 '10 at 17:40
  • 6
    Hey, Perl beats J! – David Apr 16 '10 at 23:20

Excel, 9 chars :)

Use the right tool for the job:

=COLUMN()

=COLUMN()

  • 166
    Use the right language for the job: Portuguese Excel =COL(). 6 characters. (See dolf.trieschnigg.nl/excel/excel.html ) – Debilski Apr 14 '10 at 11:03
  • 21
    Great! only it does not support ROFL though. – YOU Apr 14 '10 at 11:14
  • 63
    This solution even reproduces the limitations of Excel correctly. – kibibu Apr 15 '10 at 3:55
  • 18
    It doesn't even take a string as input. Doesn't come close to doing what the problem said. It only works if it's in the column that happens to be named after the string in question. Totally not in the spirit of the question. – phkahler Apr 16 '10 at 14:51
  • 21
    +1 for the SO column. – Alex Budovski Apr 18 '10 at 3:11

J, 17 12 10 characters

26#.64-~av

Example:

26#.64-~av  'WTF'
16074

Explanation:

  • J parses from right to left.
  • av returns a list of the ascii indexes of each of the characters in its argument, so for example av'ABC' returns 65 66 67.
  • Then we subtract 64 from each element of that list with the verb 64-~.
  • Then we convert the list to base 26 using the #. verb.
  • 6
    +1 J pwns golfscript when it comes to base conversions :) – John La Rooy Apr 14 '10 at 22:25
  • 2
    After reading a few comments about how the Excel solution really doesn't take a string input, I'm going to go with the solution that is the shortest, and actually takes a string input. – Vivin Paliath Apr 16 '10 at 16:44
  • Wow a J solution I can actually understand :) – Callum Rogers Apr 16 '10 at 21:49
  • J is made for this stuff. – Brandon Pelfrey Apr 16 '10 at 23:05
  • 2
    @Brandon: J is made for everything, as long as you don't mind spending years learning how to read it. – David Apr 16 '10 at 23:19

Brainf*ck, 81 characters (no whitespace)

,[>>>[->>+++++[-<+++++>]<+<]>[-<+>]<<++++++++[<++++++++>-]<[<->-]<[>>>+<<<-],]>>>

Explanation

,[  // get character input into p[0], enter loop if it isn't null (0)
>>>[->>+++++[-<+++++>]<+<] // take what's in p[3] and multiply by 26, storing it in p[4]
>[-<+>] // copy p[4] back to p[3]
<<++++++++[<++++++++>-]< // store 64 in p[1]
[<->-]< // subtract p[1], which is 64, from the input char to get it's alphabetical index
[>>>+<<<-] // add p[0] to p[3]
,] // get another character and repeat
>>> // move to p[3], where our final result is stored

So you'll notice I didn't actually convert the numerical value to an ascii string for printing. That would likely ruin the fun. But I did the favor of moving the pointer to the cell with the result, so at least it's useful to the machine.

Hey, what do you know, I beat C#!

  • +1 for writing a non-trivial program in Brainf*ck – Dinah Apr 16 '10 at 14:50
  • 16
    LOL @ Beating C# – Dan Apr 16 '10 at 16:35
  • I'm surprised that anyone actually uses Bf in first place – OscarRyz Apr 16 '10 at 17:58
  • 2
    C'mon man, don't stop there, do the rest of Excel too. – intuited Apr 18 '10 at 5:14
  • +1 for converting to BrainF#ck – Anonymous Type Aug 9 '10 at 2:01

Ruby 1.8.7, 53 50 46 44 24 17 characters

p ('A'..$_).count

Usage:

$ echo -n ROFL | ruby -n a.rb
326676
$ echo -n WTF | ruby -n a.rb
16074
$ echo -n A | ruby -n a.rb
1
  • Great, I tested very similar pattern already, but I didnt realize that p ( and p( is different, :( – YOU Apr 14 '10 at 11:17
  • use echo -n ... so you can drop the .chop – John La Rooy Apr 14 '10 at 11:41
  • 3
    Looks like I may have to start learning Ruby! :) – David Apr 14 '10 at 13:52
  • 14
    And I thought Perl was unreadable ;) – Vivin Paliath Apr 14 '10 at 16:49
  • @gnibbler: Thanks for the -n idea, that brings my perl solution down to 17 as well. – David Apr 15 '10 at 3:39

APL

13 characters

Put the value in x:

x←'WTF'

then compute it with:

26⊥(⎕aV⍳x)-65

The only reason J beat me is because of the parentheses. I'm thinking there should be some way to rearrange it to avoid the need for them, but it's been a long day. Ideas?

(Heh, you perl programmers with your 30+ character solutions are so cute!)

  • Maybe 26⊥⁻65+⎕aV⍳x instead? That is how you write negative 65 in APL, right? – Kragen Javier Sitaker Apr 16 '10 at 21:52
  • I don't have my APL environment in front of me right now, but I think I tried something like that and it didn't work. Off the top of my head (and admittedly I'm the furthest thing from an APL wizard!) ⁻ is equivalent to - and since it evaluates right-to-left it's applied after the +, so you end up with 26⊥⁻(65+(⎕aV⍳x)) instead of 26⊥((⁻65)+⎕aV⍳x), which is what you need here. – Ken Apr 19 '10 at 16:59
  • Accepted Perl solution beats your code by two characters... =) – kolistivra May 1 '10 at 20:49

Excel (not cheating), 25 chars

Supports up to XFD:

=COLUMN(INDIRECT(A1&"1"))

Installation:

  1. Put the formula in cell A2.

Usage:

  1. Enter the column string in cell A1.
  2. Read the result at cell A2.

54 chars, plus a lot of instructions

Supports ROFL also:

(A2)  =MAX(B:B)
(B2)  =IFERROR(26*B1+CODE(MID(A$1,ROW()-1,1))-64,0)

Installation:

  1. Clear the whole spreadsheet.
  2. Put the formula (A2) in cell A2.
  3. Put the formula (B2) in cell B2.
  4. Fill formula (B2) to as far down as possible.

Usage:

  1. Enter the column string in cell A1.
  2. Read the result at cell A2.

C# 156 146 118 Chars

using System.Linq;class P{static void Main(string[]a){System.Console.Write(
a[0].Aggregate(0,(t,c)=>(t+c-64)*26)/26);}}

Ungolfed:

using System.Linq;
class P
{
    static void Main(string[] a)
    {
        System.Console.Write(a[0]
            .Aggregate(0, (t, c) => (t + c - 64) * 26) / 26);
    }
}
  • The using C=System.Console shortcut isn't helping you here, because you end up having to say "System." twice. You can save 5 chars if you just do "using System;" and change your code accordingly. But my non-linq version is still shorter. :) – Igby Largeman Apr 14 '10 at 18:07
  • You're right, and I can make it shorter still by using the first argument instead of Console.Readline, making it shorter still. :P – Cameron MacFarland Apr 14 '10 at 23:26
  • 1
    oh crap, I helped you get ahead of me! :P – Igby Largeman Apr 15 '10 at 6:43
  • By the way, thanks for fixing my char count. I totally spaced on that. – Igby Largeman Apr 15 '10 at 6:51
  • 3
    How about Console.Write instead of WriteLine ? – Andreas Grech Apr 16 '10 at 14:25

Golfscript - 16 chars

[0]\+{31&\26*+}*


$ echo -n WTF | ./golfscript.rb excel.gs
16074
$ echo -n ROFL | ./golfscript.rb excel.gs
326676

Haskell, 50 51 56 chars

main=interact$show.foldl(\x->(26*x-64+).fromEnum)0

Usage:

~:166$ echo -n "ROFL" | ./a.out
326676
~:167$ echo -n "WTF" | ./a.out
16074

Python, 64 49 characters

s=0
for c in raw_input():s=26*s+ord(c)-64
print s

You can also replace raw_input() with input() to reduce the character count by 4, but that then requires the input to contain quotation marks around it.

And here's a subroutine that clocks in at 47 characters:

f=lambda x:len(x)and 26*f(x[:-1])+ord(x[-1])-64
  • -1: Not a full program. – kennytm Apr 14 '10 at 13:07
  • @KennyTM: Fixed – Adam Rosenfield Apr 14 '10 at 15:22
  • your #2 should be named f. Try running it now, it doesn't work. And it can be made shorter(47 characters) with the help of lambdas and short circuit evaluation: f=lambda x:len(x)and 26*f(x[:-1])+ord(x[-1])-64 – Ponkadoodle Apr 17 '10 at 1:02
  • @wallacoloo: Thanks. It's a community wiki, so you can feel free to make edits any time. – Adam Rosenfield Apr 17 '10 at 5:26
  • how about dropping len(x) for x alone? becomes 43 chars: f=lambda x:x and 26*f(x[:-1])+ord(x[-1])-64 – Nas Banov May 14 '10 at 22:16

k4 (kdb+), 11 characters

26/:1+.Q.A?

Explanation:

  • k4 parses left of right
  • .Q.A is defined within k4 - it is the vector "ABC...XYZ"
  • ? is the find operator - the index of the first match for items in the y arg within the x arg
  • +1 to offset the index
  • 26/: to convert to base 26

One caveat - this will only work where listed types are passed in:

  26/:1+.Q.A? "AD"
30

  26/:1+.Q.A? "WTF"
16074

but:

  26/:1+.Q.A? ,"A"
1

Powershell, 42 chars

[char[]]$args[($s=0)]|%{$s=$s*26+$_-64};$s

JavaScript 1.8: 66 characters

function a(p)Array.reduce(p,function(t,d)t*26+d.charCodeAt()-64,0)

Javascript 1.8: 72 characters

function a(p)(t=0,p.replace(/./g,function(d)t=t*26+d.charCodeAt()-64),t)

JavaScript 1.6: 83 characters

function a(p){t=0;p.split("").map(function(d){t=t*26+d.charCodeAt(0)-64});return t}

JavaScript: 95 characters

function a(p){r=0;t=1;l=p.length;for(i=0;i<l;i++){r+=(p.charCodeAt(l-1-i)-64)*t;t*=26}return r}

JavaScript: 105 characters

function a(p,i){i=i||0;l=p.length;return p?(p.charCodeAt(l-1)-64)*Math.pow(26,i)+a(p.slice(0,l-1),i+1):0}

Usage:

a("A")        // 1
a("B")        // 2
a("AD")       // 30
a("ABC")      // 731
a("WTF")      // 16074
a("ROFL")     // 326676
  • @Ates: Nice trick! I like map() :) – Daniel Vassallo Apr 14 '10 at 10:13
  • I shaved 4 more characters from the 1.6 solution using expression closures. You may be able to shrink it a bit more by refactoring the (t?g*26:0) part. – David Murdoch Apr 16 '10 at 18:39
  • UPDATE. I just shaved off 9 more characters by using [].reduce – David Murdoch Apr 16 '10 at 18:48
  • FWIW, I added an implementation using string#replace – Chetan Sastry Apr 16 '10 at 19:39
  • @Chetan, @David: Good job. That's neat! – Daniel Vassallo Apr 16 '10 at 19:42

Scala, 30 chars

print((0/:args(0))(_*26+_-64))" 

Example:

C:\>scala -e "print((0/:args(0))(_*26+_-64))" AD
30

C89, 58 characters

s;main(c){while(c=getchar()+1)s=26*s+c-65;printf("%d",s);}

The input (stdin) must contain only A-Z, no other characters (including newlines) are allowed.

  • 1
    getchar() returns < 0 on EOF; EOF is not defined as -1, but it's common. – strager Apr 14 '10 at 8:25
  • @strager: Good point. Ensuring full portability would then require adding 2 characters (by changing c=getchar()+1 to (c=getchar())>=0 and 65 to 64). But, this should work in almost any C implementation. – Adam Rosenfield Apr 14 '10 at 15:09

Explanation of Concepts - Excelcification

Nice. I wrote my own version of this with a little more explanation a long time ago at http://aboutdev.wordpress.com/2009/12/19/excelcification-brain-teaser-code/. Although it's not quite an optimized version!

FYI. The base 26 arithmetic is called hexavigesimal and Excel's maximum column is XFD which converts to 16383 (using 0 as the first cell) which is coincidentally exactly 2^14 cells.

Can anyone guess as to why it is 2^14??

  • 5
    May be they want to use only 64k memory at that time :-) – YOU Apr 14 '10 at 8:13
  • +1. Ha. You might be right! – AboutDev Apr 14 '10 at 10:08
  • Because they wanted to be able to do offsets (x-y) which requires a sign bit. But that's only 15bits, so what's up with the 16th bit? Is it used as a flag? – phkahler Apr 16 '10 at 14:56
  • 1
    This is not exactly base-26, because it has no 0. If we let A represent 1, and multiply with 26^n for position n (with n = 0 for the rightmost letter), it all works out as usual. – Thomas Apr 16 '10 at 15:22
  • 1
    @phkahler: you don't need a sign bit to represent offsets as long as you don't need a distinguished representation for out-of-bounds values (i.e. you can check the processor overflow bit to see if you're out of bounds). – Kragen Javier Sitaker Apr 16 '10 at 21:55

Common Lisp, 103 128 characters

(defun x(s)(reduce(lambda(x y)(+(* 26 x)y))(map 'vector(lambda(b)(-(char-code b)(char-code #\A)-1))s)))
  • +1 to you for using LISP! Awesome! – AboutDev Apr 15 '10 at 6:33

C#, 117 111 chars

No contest compared to the likes of Perl, Ruby and APL but an improvement on the other C#/Java answers given so far.

This uses Horner's rule.

class C{static void Main(string[]a){int t=0;foreach(var c in a[0]){t=(t+c-64)*26;}System.Console.Write(t/26);}}
  • 1
    You can save 3 chars by removing the space between the [] and the 'a', and the foreach braces. – Cameron MacFarland Apr 16 '10 at 17:09
  • I didn't know string implemented IEnumerable. Sweet! Unfortunately the page about Horner's rule is way over my head, but clearly a winning strategy. I don't like using Console.Write() though, due to the messy output. +1 – Igby Largeman May 10 '10 at 19:32

Perl, 34 characters

map$\=26*$\-64+ord,pop=~/./g;print

Thanks to mobrule for several suggestions.

  • You can say pop=~/./g instead of split//,$ARGV[0] You can omit the $_ in the ord call. You can use $` instead of $s` and then just say print. – mob Apr 14 '10 at 6:48

C#, 148 chars

using System;class P{static void Main(string[]a){var r=0d;int j=0,i=a[0].
Length;while(i-->0)r+=(a[0][i]-64)*Math.Pow(26,j++);Console.WriteLine(r);}}

Ungolfed:

using System;
class P
{
    static void Main(string[] a)
    {
        var r = 0d;
        int j = 0, i = a[0].Length;
        while (i-- > 0)
            r += (a[0][i] - 64) * Math.Pow(26, j++);

        Console.WriteLine(r);
    }
}

Python - 63 chars

>>> f=lambda z: reduce(lambda x,y: 26*x+y, [ord(c)-64 for c in z])

>>> f('ROFL')

326676

Clojure:

user> (reduce #(+ (* 26 %1) %2) (map #(- (int %) 64) "AD"))
30
user> (reduce #(+ (* 26 %1) %2) (map #(- (int %) 64) "ROFL"))
326676

51 characters, plus the number of characters in the input string.

C:

int r=0;
while(*c)r=r*26+*c++-64;

String is stored in 'c', value is in 'r'.

Ruby 1.9, 21 characters

p'A'.upto(gets).count

Tests:

$ echo -n A| ruby x.rb
1
$ echo -n WTF| ruby x.rb
16074
$ echo -n ROFL| ruby x.rb
326676
  • 1
    The code does not look golfed at all though. – YOU Apr 14 '10 at 8:14
  • You can use chop instead of strip to gain 1 char – JRL Apr 14 '10 at 10:53
  • Thanks @JRL, I was something wrong in usage of echo A | , it should be echo A| – YOU Apr 14 '10 at 11:05
  • Use echo -n like others and get rid of chop. – Daniel C. Sobral Apr 16 '10 at 18:22
  • Thanks @Daniel, I have updated it, but looks like echo -n is not working on Windows. – YOU Apr 16 '10 at 23:51

Common Lisp, 86 characters.

(defun z(s)(let((a 0))(map nil(lambda(v)(setf a(+(* 26 a)(digit-char-p v 36)-9)))s)a))

Java: 112 124 characters

class C{public static void main(String[]a){int r=0;for(int b:a[0].getBytes())r=26*r+b-64;System.out.print(r);}}

Common Lisp, 81 characters

(defun y(s)(reduce(lambda(x y)(+(* 26 x)(-(char-code y)64)))s :initial-value 0))

Funny that as a new user I can post my own answer but not comment on someone else's. Oh well, apologies if I'm doing this wrong!

  • I think you will have to register :) Then you'll be able to comment. – Vivin Paliath Apr 16 '10 at 21:29

MATLAB: 24 characters

polyval(input('')-64,26)

Usage:

>> polyval(input('')-64,26)
(after pressing enter) 'WTF'

ans =

       16074

Note: You can get it down to 16 characters if you pre-store the string in x, but I kind of thought it was cheating:

>> x = 'WTF'

x =

WTF

>> polyval(x-64,26)

ans =

       16074
  • How could I forget about polyval.. +1 for better solution – George Apr 17 '10 at 9:00

PHP - 73 Chars

$n=$argv[1];$s=$i=0;while($i<strlen($n))$s=$s*26+ord($n[$i++])-64;echo$s;

Usage:

php -r '$n=$argv[1];$s=$i=0;while($i<strlen($n))$s=$s*26+ord($n[$i++])-64;echo$s;' AA

> 27
  • 1
    You could lose 10 characters by removing the curly braces around your while function and dumping the variable initialization. – ChiperSoft Apr 16 '10 at 17:23

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