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mpirun (and mpiexec) do not seem to be passing command line arguments to my c code.

Running my exeutable "gecko" directly from the command line gives expected:

$ ./gecko  -np 2

main:There are 3 arguments:
arg=./gecko
arg=-np
arg=2

But running the same through mpirun is different:

$ mpirun -np 2 ./gecko

main:There are 1 arguments:
arg=./gecko

which means MPI_init(argc,argv) doesn't have any arguments to work with. I'm on Ubuntu 12.04 with MPICH 2.

Can anyone see a reason why this is not happening?

Thanks.

--------------------------- EDIT ---------------------------------

There are many examples on the net that say the way to initialize MPI is via the command line arguments, eg.:

#include <stdio.h>
#include “mpi.h”                                
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
 int size, rank;
 MPI_Init(&argc, &argv);                       
 MPI_Comm_size(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &size);           
 MPI_Comm_rank(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &rank);
 printf(“Greetings from process %i\n”, rank);
 MPI_Finalize();                                
 return 0;
}

and that the way to execute the mpi code is to use:

mpirun -np 2 ./code_name

So, if mpirun does not pass the arguments np and 2 to the c code, how does the c code ever get to know how many processors it should be run on?

  • Well, at least it is consistent. With OpenMPI a have some processes receiving the arguments and other part not receiving them (in Fortran, though). – Vladimir F Oct 13 '14 at 18:50
  • 1
    You should use instead mpirun -np 2 ./gecko -np 2 if you'd like to pass -np 2 to gecko. – Hristo Iliev Oct 14 '14 at 14:27
  • MPI-1 required that argc and argv should be passed to MPI_Init. MPI-2 removed that requirement. Most examples use MPI_Init(&argc, &argv) purely of historical reasons. – Hristo Iliev Oct 15 '14 at 15:38
  • Thanks @Hristo Iliev , that explains why I was so confused! – kotozna Oct 15 '14 at 19:36
1

Ever since circa 1997 MPI_Init() also works if both its arguments are NULL. This means that practically all MPI implementations use a different mechanism to pass configuration information, namely environment variables and files. For example, Open MPI passes the following variables:

$ cat print_ompi_vars
#!/bin/bash
printenv | grep ^OMPI | sort
$ mpiexec -np 1 ./print_ompi_vars
OMPI_COMM_WORLD_LOCAL_RANK=0
OMPI_COMM_WORLD_LOCAL_SIZE=1
OMPI_COMM_WORLD_NODE_RANK=0
OMPI_COMM_WORLD_RANK=0
OMPI_COMM_WORLD_SIZE=1
OMPI_MCA_btl=^tcp
OMPI_MCA_btl_openib_ib_timeout=24
OMPI_MCA_btl_openib_warn_default_gid_prefix=0
OMPI_MCA_btl_tcp_if_include=ib0
OMPI_MCA_carto=file
OMPI_MCA_carto_file_path=/opt/MPI/openmpi/carto/carto_2K-64C.txt
OMPI_MCA_ess=env
OMPI_MCA_mpi_yield_when_idle=0
OMPI_MCA_oob_tcp_if_include=ib0
OMPI_MCA_orte_app_num=0
OMPI_MCA_orte_cpu_model=Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           X5675  @ 3.07GHz
OMPI_MCA_orte_cpu_type=GenuineIntel
OMPI_MCA_orte_daemonize=1
OMPI_MCA_orte_ess_jobid=4114219009
OMPI_MCA_orte_ess_node_rank=0
OMPI_MCA_orte_ess_num_procs=1
OMPI_MCA_orte_ess_vpid=0
OMPI_MCA_orte_hnp_uri=4114219008.0;tcp://1.2.3.4:48206
OMPI_MCA_orte_local_daemon_uri=4114219008.1;tcp://1.2.3.4:59277
OMPI_MCA_orte_num_nodes=1
OMPI_MCA_orte_num_restarts=0
OMPI_MCA_orte_precondition_transports=1f4c3cf87403b137-a8e3173542efb9c3
OMPI_MCA_plm=rsh
OMPI_MCA_shmem_RUNTIME_QUERY_hint=mmap
OMPI_UNIVERSE_SIZE=1

It works similarly with other MPI implementations.

Anyway, if you wish to pass arguments to your MPI executable, put them as usual after the name of the executable:

$ mpiexec -n 16 <other mpiexec args> ./gecko -np 2 <other program args>
  • Do these variables exist also on Windows when OMPI is called? – frankliuao Jun 27 '17 at 20:19
  • Perhaps. I haven't used Open MPI on Windows and it is no longer supported, but most of the code is platform-independent and it is perhaps reasonable to assume that the same variables are used on Windows too. – Hristo Iliev Jun 29 '17 at 4:04
  • Yeah I would think so too. Windows is quite weird. Not an OS for me but I have to consider the possibility of Windows users... – frankliuao Jun 30 '17 at 15:15
5

The -np argument is not meant to be interpreted by your executable, but by mpirun. If you want to pass extra arguments to your executable, you'd have to list them after the executable name as usual.

If you need the number of MPI tasks, you should use the appropriate MPI function that provide you with that number.

Edit:

MPI may pass startup information through the arguments given to MPI_Init or by any other means that pleases the implementor. Depending on the MPI implementation that you use, you may see that MPI passes a lot more arguments to your program. MPI_Init then rips all stuff that it needs and leaves only those things that it doesn't understand.

You should not rely on any such argument passing convention in your application. MPI is meant to be portable and you should only use MPI functions to access the runtime parameters.

  • Then this is what I don't understand: There are many examples of MPI_Init(&argv,&argc) being used to initialize the number of processors from the command line. My understanding was that you supplied mpirun with the number of processors (via -np 2) and this was passed to MPI_init. How does MPI_Init() get to know the number of processors if -np 2 is not passed to it? i.e. what is the correct syntax to launch my job on 2 processors? – kotozna Oct 15 '14 at 11:30
  • @kotozna, mpirun (or mpiexec) is usually the name of the program that does the initial launch of as many MPI processes as requested. It also passes those processes the information needed by them to find each other during the MPI_Init() call. MPI_Init() does not start new processes. – Hristo Iliev Oct 15 '14 at 15:37

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