14

I am trying to access the state of a component inside a setInterval in this way but it's not working:

componentDidMount: function() {
    setInterval(function() {
      console.log(this.state);
    }, 3000);
}

However, if I place the callback function in a separate component method, it works perfectly:

displayState: function() {
  console.log(this.state)
}
componentDidMount: function() {
    setInterval(this.displayState(), 3000);
}

Any idea why is this happening? I would prefer to use the first option.

  • The second version works because React "auto-binds" methods on components. To make the first version work, bind the function as noted in one of the answers. – Ross Allen Oct 13 '14 at 21:02
  • 2
    you can't call the function on passing to setInterval, that just fires it once immediatly and the interval doesn't do anything. how it works perfectly i dont' get. – dandavis Oct 13 '14 at 21:03
27

In your first example, this is out of scope when the callback function fires. One way to solve this problem would be to use a variable:

componentDidMount: function() {
    var self = this;
    setInterval(function() {
      console.log(self.state);
    }, 3000);
}

The problem with your second attempt is that you are calling the function immediately and passing the result of executing the function to setInterval. You should pass the function itself, taking care to bind the value of this:

componentDidMount: function() {
    setInterval(this.displayState.bind(this), 3000);
}

To clarify, the difference between this approach and the second example in your question is that here, a function is being passed to setInterval (because function.bind() returns a function).

As you are using React.createClass, it is not necessary to manage the binding of this yourself, due to autobind. This means that you can just pass the function itself and this will be the same as in the original context:

componentDidMount: function() {
    setInterval(this.displayState, 3000);
}

Of course, the most suitable approach depends on whether you prefer to use an anonymous function or not.

  • a cleaner way to do that while re-using the actual intended method is componentDidMount: function() { setInterval(this.displayState.bind(this), 3000); }, ... (DRY) – dandavis Oct 13 '14 at 21:07
  • @Tom Fenech What is the difference between that and my second example? It works without bind. – danst_18 Oct 13 '14 at 21:19
  • 1
    the difference is not having repeated code (console.log), or an extra anon function. if you use an extra anon, then you don't need bind(), you can use the old "that=this" trick: componentDidMount: function() {var that=this; setInterval(function() { console.log(that.state);}, 3000); } – dandavis Oct 13 '14 at 21:27
  • @dandavis It seems autobind is not working correctly in my one. when I do this componentDidMount: function() { setInterval(this.displayState, 3000); }. state doesn't work in that function. But if i bind it, state does work. Any reason why they autobind is not working? Thanks – Mesmerize86 May 31 '18 at 0:29
  • @Mesmerize86 it works in this example codesandbox.io/s/xp3or6z4pw (note that I am using React 15 because createClass has been removed in newer versions). – Tom Fenech May 31 '18 at 9:22
4

You need to execute the interval handler with the correct reference to this. Use React’s autobinding for the cleasest solution IMO:

displayState: function() {
  console.log(this.state)
},
componentDidMount: function() {
    setInterval(this.displayState, 3000)
}

Or use bind if you want an anonymous function:

componentDidMount: function() {
    setInterval(function() {
        console.log(this.state)
    }.bind(this), 3000)
}
  • you cannot bind with curly braces – CyberAbhay Feb 8 at 10:52

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