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How can I keep order in array-map? Array-map with a length above 8 behaves completely different in Clojure and Clojurescript. Example:

cljs

(array-map :a true :c true :d false :b true :z false :h false
           :o true :p true :w false :r true :t false :g false)
-> {:o true, :p true, :r true, :t false, :w false, :z false, :a true, :b true, :c true, :d false, :g false, :h false}

clj

(array-map :a true :c true :d false :b true :z false :h false
           :o true :p true :w false :r true :t false :g false)
-> {:a true :c true :d false :b true :z false :h false :o true :p true :w false :r true :t false :g false}
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  • I suspect ClojureScript is not creating an array-map. What is its type? This could happen if it creates an empty array-map, into which it assocs or conjs new entries. At some stage, it will flip into a hash-map. This could be considered a bug, I think. The official docs promise you an array-map.
    – Thumbnail
    Oct 13, 2014 at 22:04

1 Answer 1

2
+50

Update:

As of release 2371, non-higher-order calls to cljs.core/array-map are backed by a macro which emits hash maps for > 8 key-value pairs. See CLJS-873 for ticket + patch.


(Original answer follows.)

The most likely explanation is that you're doing this at the REPL. ClojureScript's standard REPL, as implemented in the (Clojure) namespace cljs.repl, operates by receiving string representations of returned values from the JS environment, reading them to produce Clojure data and printing them back out again. See line 156 of src/clj/cljs/repl.clj in ClojureScript's sources (link to release 2371).

When the return value of an expression entered on the REPL is a large array map – or a sorted map, or a data.avl sorted map – reading its string representation will produce a hash map on the Clojure side. Needless to say, when this hash map is then printed, the original ordering is lost.

To confirm whether this is indeed what is happening, try doing this at the REPL (copied & pasted from a ClojureScript REPL session in a current checkout):

ClojureScript:cljs.user> (array-map 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14)
{1 2, 3 4, 5 6, 7 8, 9 10, 11 12, 13 14}
ClojureScript:cljs.user> (array-map 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18)
{7 8, 1 2, 15 16, 13 14, 17 18, 3 4, 11 12, 9 10, 5 6}
ClojureScript:cljs.user> (seq (array-map 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18))
([1 2] [3 4] [5 6] [7 8] [9 10] [11 12] [13 14] [15 16] [17 18])
ClojureScript:cljs.user> (hash-map 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18)
{7 8, 1 2, 15 16, 13 14, 17 18, 3 4, 11 12, 9 10, 5 6}

Note that calling seq on your array map does produce the expected result.

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  • I created a ticket in JIRA to track this: dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJS-872. It's a minor issue, but still worth ironing out eventually, I guess. Oct 14, 2014 at 0:36
  • It's probably not a problem only with the REPL. Your code is returned well, even without the use of "seq". In contrast, my array-map "seq" does not help at all. As I understand it, if it's a problem with the REPL, this iteration should work correctly, but does not work. (for [[k v] (array-map :a true :c true :d false :b true :z false :h false :o true :p true :w false :r true :t false :g false)] [k v])
    – Ribelo
    Oct 14, 2014 at 6:28
  • You're right – there's a bug in how non-higher-order calls to cljs.core/array-map are handled. I submitted a ticket with patch @ dev.clojure.org/jira/browse/CLJS-873. Oct 14, 2014 at 12:34
  • A quick update: my patch has been merged to master, array-map should behave as expected in the next release. Nov 29, 2014 at 23:56
  • Hey Michal, has this issue been fixed? because I still get this (println (array-map :one 1 :two 2 :three 3 :four 4 :five 5 :six 6 :seven 7 :eight 8 :nine 9)) Returns this unordered map {:one 1, :eight 8, :three 3, :five 5, :four 4, :nine 9, :two 2, :seven 7, :six 6}
    – hzhu
    Jan 20, 2015 at 21:58

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