18

What is the performance difference between retrieving the value by key in a JavaScript object vs iterating over an array of individual JavaScript objects?

In my case, I have a JavaScript object containing user information where the keys are the user's IDs and the values are each user's information.

The reason I ask this is because I would like to use the angular-ui-select module to select users, but I can't use that module with a Javascript object - it requires an array.

How much, if anything, am I sacrificing by switching from a lookup by key, to a lookup by iteration?

By key:

var user = users[id];

By iteration

var user;

for (var i = 0; i < users.length; i ++) {
  if (users[i].id == id) { 
    user = users[i]; break;
  }
}
  • 3
    Don't confuse JavaScript objects with JSON! – Felix Kling Oct 14 '14 at 6:27
  • It's pretty unfair: linear search (your array loop) vs. nearly random access (hash table implementation) – wnrph Oct 14 '14 at 7:47
  • here a quick benchmark, which could help you: jsben.ch/#/Y9jDP – EscapeNetscape Oct 20 '16 at 20:50
  • This is outdated solution to do this, you'd always use: users.find(user => user.id === id) Here's the fixed benchmark: jsben.ch/#/UM0ju – Hatch Dec 19 '16 at 13:06
  • @Hatch perhaps, but not when you need to support older browsers. You'll need a polyfill for the method and a transpiler for the => arrow functions. – Phil Cooper Jan 9 '17 at 18:00
16

The answer to this is browser dependent, however, there are a few performance tests on jsperf.com on this matter. It also comes down to the size of your data. Generally it is faster to use object key value pairs when you have large amounts of data. For small datasets, arrays can be faster.

Array search will have different performance dependent on where in the array your target item exist. Object search will have a more consistent search performance as keys doesn't have a specific order.

Also looping through arrays are faster than looping through keys, so if you plan on doing operations on all items, it can be wise to put them in an array. In some of my project I do both, since I need to do bulk operations and fast lookup from identifiers.

A test:

http://jsben.ch/#/Y9jDP

| improve this answer | |
  • From that second link it seems that a for loop is insanely faster than anything else.. I would have assumed that a direct lookup in an object (knowing the key) would be the fastest.. – user3594595 Oct 14 '14 at 6:37
  • 1
    Well, the red test result (the fastest one), is a best case array search. The item that is searched for is the first one, and naturally it is fast. If you look at the worst case, where the item exist last in the array, it is much slower. Object search has a fairly consistent lookup performance independent of the location. – Ole Borgersen Oct 14 '14 at 7:24
  • 1
    Fixed your test with proper performant solution: jsben.ch/#/UM0ju – Hatch Dec 19 '16 at 13:09
  • As Ole mentions, for large numbers of items the performance of an object lookup becomes much more efficient than looping through arrays, even with the most performant array functions. Here is a test with 10,000 items in an array, with 10 key/value pairs in each item, showing > 1000x improvement of object vs. array: jsperf.com/object-key-vs-array-find. My test code is not the prettiest; let me know if I've missed something. – Ari Apr 3 '17 at 18:01
2

This problem touches all programming languages. It depends on many factors:

  • size of your collection -arrays will get slower when you are searching for the last key, and array is quite long
  • can elements repeat them selves-if yes, than you need a array. If no: you need either a dictionary (map) or you need to write a add method that for each add will iterate your array and find possible duplicates-that can be troublesome, when dealing with large lists
  • average key usage - you will lose performance, if the most requested userId is at the end of the list.

In your example map would be a better solution. Secondly, you need to add a break to yor code:)

var user;

for (var i = 0; i < users.length; i ++) {
  if (users[i].id == id) {
     user = users[i]; break;
  }
}

Or you will lose performance:)

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-5

associative arrays are much slower then arrays with numbered indexes, because associative arrays work by doing string comparisons, which are much, much slower then number comparisons!

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