11

Given the following classes where ConcreteBar implements BarIfc:

class Base {

public:

    Base(BarIfc& bar) : _bar(bar) { }

    void foo() {
        _bar.bar();
    }

private:

    Base(const Base& other);
    Base& operator=(const Base& other);

    BarIfc& _bar; // Pure virtual interface
};

class Child : public Base {

public:
    // bar is passed to base class before initialization
    Child(int i) : Base(_bar), _bar(i) { 
    }

private:

    Child(const Child& other);
    Child& operator=(const Child& other);

    ConcreteBar _bar;
};

Am I right in assuming that this

Child(int i) : Base(_bar), _bar(i) {}

is "valid" C++ as long as I'm not using (e.g. calling a method) _bar reference within the initializer list of the base class?

12

Under the assumption that ConcreteBar is a subobject

It is valid since the storage has been allocated for §3.7.5/1

The storage duration of member subobjects, base class subobjects and array elements is that of their complete object (1.8).

and §3.8/5 says:

Before the lifetime of an object has started but after the storage which the object will occupy has been allocated or, after the lifetime of an object has ended and before the storage which the object occupied is reused or released, any pointer that refers to the storage location where the object will be or was located may be used but only in limited ways. For an object under construction or destruction, see 12.7 [referring to non-static member usage]

so that is valid as long as you don't use the reference.

  • It it valid to use the reference after the lifetime started? – JVApen Aug 26 '18 at 19:13
  • Lifetime of the reference is exactly its storage duration. For the object it points to it is safe since lifetime is a concept that consumers should pay attention to. – Marco A. Aug 27 '18 at 6:41
7

Yes it's valid, because while _bar hasn't been constructed yet, the storage for it does exist, and taking a reference to it is OK so long as you don't actually use that reference until you're in the derived class constructor body.

Here's another post on a similar topic that you may find illuminating: https://stackoverflow.com/a/5905746/4323

And finally, an answer which quotes the standard: https://stackoverflow.com/a/6258431/4323 saying:

Before the lifetime of an object has started but after the storage which the object will occupy has been allocated [...], any pointer that refers to the storage location where the object will be or was located may be used but only in limited ways.

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