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I'm looking for a CSS-only way to position content in an :after pseudo element absolutely relative to another - possibly multiline - element's top edge. The result should resemble this:

Result demonstration

Usually there's no rocket science involved to archieve this, but I'd like to find a solution that also meets the following criteria:

  • Do not use the :before pseudoelement (this is already needed to achieve some other independent thing),
  • do not use display: block/inline-block; on the inline element (because it creates ugly holes in the text flow),
  • allow to define the width of the elements as a percentage of the containing element (at least after applying the rule of three),
  • do not hardcode the top position/margin/padding of the :after-pseudo-element in any way that makes it dependent of the parent element's position inside the grandparent element, the parent element's height or the actual element's height (or to make it short: don't make anything dependent of the content),
  • do not insert additional HTML elements, and
  • do not add JS.

I created a Codepen that hopefully makes it easier to grasp what I'm going for here.

I know that it is easily possible to get to the result by violating one of the restrictions listed above (as demonstrated in the Codepen), but I'm looking for an elegant solution to this problem where this is not needed.

After playing around with this for quite a while I'd say that it is not possible, but it would be great if someone could convince me of the contrary - or at least formally proves that it actually is impossible. Thanks a lot for any help in advance.

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  • Is ::before needed for something position-sensitive, too? Otherwise you can use it. – Terry Oct 14 '14 at 13:15
  • 1
    The ::after width should be relative to <p> buts its top should relative to <span>, correct? I believe this is the hardest part... – Luizgrs Oct 14 '14 at 13:28
  • 1
    Thanks for your comments. @Terry: The idea of this questions was to find a solution without using :before e.g. if this is already used for something else. @Luizgrs: Yes, I think this is the essence of the problem. I'm interested if there's some kind of hack or workaround to relate to both elements, one for width and the other for horizontal placement. – bfncs Oct 14 '14 at 18:05
  • Why must it be a ::after pseudo element? Can't it be a real element like codepen.io/HerrSerker/pen/GwJhu – yunzen Oct 17 '14 at 13:15
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    The requirements you impose are impossible to meet using pure CSS – Zach Saucier Oct 23 '14 at 18:13
3

Well, the only possible solution with the wanted method could be this.

- First to mention, for this to work you'd need to define ::after content directly in CSS, not through data- attribute. (I don't know why, but seems like a parsing problem.)

- Set position:relative to the .wrapper. as you're going to move ::after left-right based on that parent (not direct one).

- Set width: 100% to ::after (100% of the parent)

- Set white-space: pre to ::after - this is important

- Write the content directly with using \A (escape character) to break the word in particular places.

- Set top: 0 and give it a negative right position (how far you want)

Note: You might need to set word-wrap: break-word on certain elemenets if the additional text is overflowing out of the wrapper.

Basically, this is the addition/modification for your CSS:

.wrapper {
  position: relative;
}

.accent::before{
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    content: "Unfortunately \A it is aligned with \A the last line of said span.";
    white-space: pre;
    right: -70%;
}

.content p {
    word-wrap: break-word; /* in my example <p> was problematic */
}

Note: I don't know how good this method is for responsive designs, never tried it that way.

Tested on FF and Chrome.
Live example

EDIT:
Hm, yeah, I started with ::after then by accident switched to ::before =)

Alright, minor modifications to the CSS:

- Instead of width: 100% set width: auto

- Instead of top: 0 you need to manually (sorry) reduce margin-top: -(number)px - don't use top as it's gonna set top position based on the wrapper itself.

- Switch right: -(number)% to right: -(number)px

CSS modification:

.accent::after{
    width: auto;
    right: -50px;
    margin-top: -40px;
    /* and remove "top" property completely */
}

Live example

ANOTHER EDIT
Cleaner working solution where you can use content: attr(data-meta) (removed white-space: pre and set width to wanted percentage size:

.accent::after{
    position: absolute;
    width: 30%;
    content: attr(data-meta);
    right: -50px;
    margin-top: -40px;
}

Live example

2
  • This doesn't meet the requirements because you use the ::before pseudo-element and your solution doesn't work any more when using ::after instead: jsfiddle.net/3hvmq13k/2. Thanks a lot for giving it a try, anyway. – bfncs Oct 14 '14 at 20:03
  • Both of your newly suggested solutions break the requirements in that they hardcode the top position/margin. In both modifications this is relative to the height of .accent (not allowing for another number of lines inside the element, see jsfiddle.net/9xunLj3t). Thanks for your effort, though. – bfncs Oct 15 '14 at 7:28
0

With these requirements I tried:

  • using bottom [?] property at the ::after element,or
  • using translateY [?] property

For example: http://jsfiddle.net/csdtesting/w4zvmbjh/

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="content">
         <h2>1-Unfortunately it doesn't work with multline content</h2>

        <p>Pellentesque ultrices sed quam pellentesque, eu ultricies nulla semper.
            <label for="pretty" class="accent" data-meta="Unfortunately it is aligned with the last line of said span.">Etiam leo ligula, laoreet eget urna et, dignissim facilisis nisi ante.</label>Duis gravida lectus tellus, sed rutrum nisi ultricies a. Aliquam pellentesque ante at ipsum convallis porta.</p>
         <h2>2-Unfortunately it doesn't work with multline content</h2>

        <p>Pellentesque ultrices sed quam pellentesque, eu ultricies nulla semper. <span class="accent-bottom" data-meta="Unfortunately it is aligned with the last line of said span.">Etiam leo ligula, laoreet eget urna et, dignissim facilisis nisi ante.</span> Duis gravida lectus tellus, sed rutrum nisi ultricies a. Aliquam pellentesque ante at ipsum convallis porta.</p>
    </div>
</div>

label
{
    color:red !important;
}

/* Basic typo (not problem related) */
body {
  font-family: Georgia, serif;
  font-size: 82.5%;
  line-height: 1.167;
  color: #555;
}

h1, h2 {
  color: #222;
}

h1 {
  font-size: 1.167em;
}

h2 {
  font-size: 1em;
}

/* Problem related styles */

.wrapper {
  position: relative;
  width: 580px;
  margin: 2em auto;
}

.content p {
  width: 62.069%;
}

.accent {
  color: cornflowerblue;
  &:after {
    content: attr(data-meta);
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    width: 31.035%;
    transform:translateY(-50%)

  }
}

.accent-bottom {
  color: cornflowerblue;
  &:after {
      content: attr(data-meta);
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;
    width: 31.035%;
    bottom: 14%;
  }
}
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  • 3
    I think your solution only works due to the length of the text. If you add additional text to the span data-meta element the positioning is off. – Brett DeWoody Oct 20 '14 at 5:36
  • Cannnot find other solution excerpt ::before.There is no way. – Giannis Grivas Oct 20 '14 at 10:10

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