14

We are trying to release some productive Apps with Xamarin.Forms but one of our main issues is the overall slowness between button pressing and displaying of content. After a few experiments, we discovered that even a simple ContentPage with 40 labels take more than 100 ms to show up:

public static class App
{
    public static DateTime StartTime;

    public static Page GetMainPage()
    {    
        return new NavigationPage(new StartPage());
    }
}

public class StartPage : ContentPage
{
    public StartPage()
    {
        Content = new Button {
            Text = "Start",
            Command = new Command(o => {
                App.StartTime = DateTime.Now;
                Navigation.PushAsync(new StopPage());
            }),
        };
    }
}

public class StopPage : ContentPage
{
    public StopPage()
    {
        Content = new StackLayout();
        for (var i = 0; i < 40; i++)
            (Content as StackLayout).Children.Add(new Label{ Text = "Label " + i });
    }

    protected override void OnAppearing()
    {
        ((Content as StackLayout).Children[0] as Label).Text = "Stop after " + (DateTime.Now - App.StartTime).TotalMilliseconds + " ms";

        base.OnAppearing();
    }
}

Especially on Android it get's worse the more labels you're trying to display. The first button press (which is crucial for the user) even takes ~300 ms. We need to show something on the screen in less than 30 ms to create a good user experience.

Why does it take so long with Xamarin.Forms to display some simple labels? And how to work around this issue to create a shippable App?

Experiments

The code can be forked on GitHub at https://github.com/perpetual-mobile/XFormsPerformance

I've also written a small example to demonstrate that similar code utilizing the native APIs from Xamarin.Android is significantly faster and does not get slower when adding more content: https://github.com/perpetual-mobile/XFormsPerformance/tree/android-native-api

15

Xamarin Support Team wrote me:

The team is aware of the issue, and they are working on optimising the UI initialisation code. You may see some improvements in upcoming releases.

Update: after seven month of idling, Xamarin changed the bug report status to 'CONFIRMED'.

Good to know. So we have to be patient. Fortunately Sean McKay over in Xamarin Forums suggested to override all layouting code to improve performance: https://forums.xamarin.com/discussion/comment/87393#Comment_87393

But his suggestion also means that we have to write the complete label code again. Here is an version of a FixedLabel which does not do the costly layout cycles and has a some features like bindable properties for text and color. Using this instead of Label improves performance by 80% and more depending on the number of labels and where they occur.

public class FixedLabel : View
{
    public static readonly BindableProperty TextProperty = BindableProperty.Create<FixedLabel,string>(p => p.Text, "");

    public static readonly BindableProperty TextColorProperty = BindableProperty.Create<FixedLabel,Color>(p => p.TextColor, Style.TextColor);

    public readonly double FixedWidth;

    public readonly double FixedHeight;

    public Font Font;

    public LineBreakMode LineBreakMode = LineBreakMode.WordWrap;

    public TextAlignment XAlign;

    public TextAlignment YAlign;

    public FixedLabel(string text, double width, double height)
    {
        SetValue(TextProperty, text);
        FixedWidth = width;
        FixedHeight = height;
    }

    public Color TextColor {
        get {
            return (Color)GetValue(TextColorProperty);
        }
        set {
            if (TextColor != value)
                return;
            SetValue(TextColorProperty, value);
            OnPropertyChanged("TextColor");
        }
    }

    public string Text {
        get {
            return (string)GetValue(TextProperty);
        }
        set {
            if (Text != value)
                return;
            SetValue(TextProperty, value);
            OnPropertyChanged("Text");
        }
    }

    protected override SizeRequest OnSizeRequest(double widthConstraint, double heightConstraint)
    {
        return new SizeRequest(new Size(FixedWidth, FixedHeight));
    }
}

The Android Renderer looks like this:

public class FixedLabelRenderer : ViewRenderer
{
    public TextView TextView;

    protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<Xamarin.Forms.View> e)
    {
        base.OnElementChanged(e);

        var label = Element as FixedLabel;
        TextView = new TextView(Context);
        TextView.Text = label.Text;
        TextView.TextSize = (float)label.Font.FontSize;
        TextView.Gravity = ConvertXAlignment(label.XAlign) | ConvertYAlignment(label.YAlign);
        TextView.SetSingleLine(label.LineBreakMode != LineBreakMode.WordWrap);
        if (label.LineBreakMode == LineBreakMode.TailTruncation)
            TextView.Ellipsize = Android.Text.TextUtils.TruncateAt.End;

        SetNativeControl(TextView);
    }

    protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == "Text")
            TextView.Text = (Element as FixedLabel).Text;

        base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);
    }

    static GravityFlags ConvertXAlignment(Xamarin.Forms.TextAlignment xAlign)
    {
        switch (xAlign) {
            case Xamarin.Forms.TextAlignment.Center:
                return GravityFlags.CenterHorizontal;
            case Xamarin.Forms.TextAlignment.End:
                return GravityFlags.End;
            default:
                return GravityFlags.Start;
        }
    }

    static GravityFlags ConvertYAlignment(Xamarin.Forms.TextAlignment yAlign)
    {
        switch (yAlign) {
            case Xamarin.Forms.TextAlignment.Center:
                return GravityFlags.CenterVertical;
            case Xamarin.Forms.TextAlignment.End:
                return GravityFlags.Bottom;
            default:
                return GravityFlags.Top;
        }
    }
}

And here the iOS Render:

public class FixedLabelRenderer : ViewRenderer<FixedLabel, UILabel>
{
    protected override void OnElementChanged(ElementChangedEventArgs<FixedLabel> e)
    {
        base.OnElementChanged(e);

        SetNativeControl(new UILabel(RectangleF.Empty) {
            BackgroundColor = Element.BackgroundColor.ToUIColor(),
            AttributedText = ((FormattedString)Element.Text).ToAttributed(Element.Font, Element.TextColor),
            LineBreakMode = ConvertLineBreakMode(Element.LineBreakMode),
            TextAlignment = ConvertAlignment(Element.XAlign),
            Lines = 0,
        });

        BackgroundColor = Element.BackgroundColor.ToUIColor();
    }

    protected override void OnElementPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == "Text")
            Control.AttributedText = ((FormattedString)Element.Text).ToAttributed(Element.Font, Element.TextColor);

        base.OnElementPropertyChanged(sender, e);
    }

    // copied from iOS LabelRenderer
    public override void LayoutSubviews()
    {
        base.LayoutSubviews();
        if (Control == null)
            return;
        Control.SizeToFit();
        var num = Math.Min(Bounds.Height, Control.Bounds.Height);
        var y = 0f;
        switch (Element.YAlign) {
            case TextAlignment.Start:
                y = 0;
                break;
            case TextAlignment.Center:
                y = (float)(Element.FixedHeight / 2 - (double)(num / 2));
                break;
            case TextAlignment.End:
                y = (float)(Element.FixedHeight - (double)num);
                break;
        }
        Control.Frame = new RectangleF(0, y, (float)Element.FixedWidth, num);
    }

    static UILineBreakMode ConvertLineBreakMode(LineBreakMode lineBreakMode)
    {
        switch (lineBreakMode) {
            case LineBreakMode.TailTruncation:
                return UILineBreakMode.TailTruncation;
            case LineBreakMode.WordWrap:
                return UILineBreakMode.WordWrap;
            default:
                return UILineBreakMode.Clip;
        }
    }

    static UITextAlignment ConvertAlignment(TextAlignment xAlign)
    {
        switch (xAlign) {
            case TextAlignment.Start:
                return UITextAlignment.Left;
            case TextAlignment.End:
                return UITextAlignment.Right;
            default:
                return UITextAlignment.Center;
        }
    }
}
  • But how do you know label's dimensions at view level? I mean they differ based on native views and fonts, etc. – Miha Markic Feb 1 '15 at 11:51
  • 1
    We often use xforms-kickstarter.com/#referring-to-the-screen-size to determine how much space something should have. Sometimes it's necessary to use Device.OnPlatform to take platform specifics into account. Over all, it's not a great solution. It's a dirty workaround which makes it possible to not kick Xamarin.Forms from our customer projects. – Rodja Feb 2 '15 at 4:21
  • The bug was resolved as fixed earlier this year. Have you tested to see if performance is more acceptable now? – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Aug 20 '16 at 21:50
4

What you are measuring here is the sum of:

  • the time it takes to create the page
  • to layout it
  • to animate it on screen

On a nexus5, I observe times in the magnitude of 300ms for the first call, and of 120ms for subsequent ones.

This is because the OnAppearing() will only be invoked when the view is fully animated in place.

You can easily measure the animation time by replacing your app with:

public class StopPage : ContentPage
{
    public StopPage()
    {
    }

    protected override void OnAppearing()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine ((DateTime.Now - App.StartTime).TotalMilliseconds + " ms");        
        base.OnAppearing();
    }
}

and I observe times like:

134.045 ms
2.796 ms
3.554 ms

This gives some insights: - there's no animation on PushAsync on android (there's on iPhone, taking 500ms) - the first time you push the page, you pay a 120ms tax, due to a new allocation. - XF is doing a good job at reusing page renderers if possible

What we're interested into is the time for displaying the 40 labels, nothing else. Let's change the code again:

public class StopPage : ContentPage
{
    public StopPage()
    {
    }

    protected override void OnAppearing()
    {
        App.StartTime = DateTime.Now;

        Content = new StackLayout();
        for (var i = 0; i < 40; i++)
            (Content as StackLayout).Children.Add(new Label{ Text = "Label " + i });

        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine ((DateTime.Now - App.StartTime).TotalMilliseconds + " ms");

        base.OnAppearing();
    }
}

times observed (on 3 calls):

264.015 ms
186.772 ms
189.965 ms
188.696 ms

That's still a bit too much, but as the ContentView is set first, this is measuring 40 layout cycles, as each new Label is redrawing the screen. Let's change that:

public class StopPage : ContentPage
{
    public StopPage()
    {
    }

    protected override void OnAppearing()
    {
        App.StartTime = DateTime.Now;

        var layout = new StackLayout();
        for (var i = 0; i < 40; i++)
            layout.Children.Add(new Label{ Text = "Label " + i });

        Content = layout;
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine ((DateTime.Now - App.StartTime).TotalMilliseconds + " ms");

        base.OnAppearing();
    }
}

And here are my measurements:

178.685 ms
110.221 ms
117.832 ms
117.072 ms

This is becoming very reasonable, esp. given that you're drawing (instantiating, and measuring) 40 labels when your screen can only display 20.

There's indeed yet some room for improvement, but the situation is not as bad as it seems. The 30ms rule for mobile says that everything that takes more than 30ms should be async and not block the UI. Here it takes a bit more than 30ms to switch a page, but from a user point of view, I don't perceive this as slow.

  • 1
    To make statements about the interaction performance you need to measure the time between the click event being triggered until the content appears on the screen; starting the timer in OnAppearing is to late. – Rodja Oct 24 '14 at 13:48
  • Yes, Xamarin.Forms does some pretty costly measuring when adding views to an already visible layout (I guess this is part of the problem). This is why I added all the content before OnAppearing. I think Xamarin.Forms should do the layout measurements in a one step to save time. – Rodja Oct 24 '14 at 13:51
  • Try different numbers of labels. With one label it's pretty fast (~ 10 ms). The more labels you add the slower it becomes. I've written a small example using Xamarin.Android at github.com/perpetual-mobile/XFormsPerformance/tree/… which shows that there is no such performance loss when using more labels with the native apis. And please remember: this is only a minimal example. Other views and layouts are also adding slowness when using Xamarin.Forms. This is not reasonable!!! – Rodja Oct 24 '14 at 13:58
  • 6
    Stephane, the Xamarin Support team just informed me that you are one of the Xamarin.Forms developers. I suggest you update your answer to include that fact. Is your answer really the official point of view about this issue? Are you personally assigned to performance issues? Does Xamarin plan to do something about the fact that you can't write Xamarin.Forms Apps which have similar performance as Apps written with the native APIs? – Rodja Nov 10 '14 at 16:44
  • 6
    I completely agree with @Rodja. Xamarin should warn the users that XForms is not appropriate for production applications. We have been facing a lot of problems in our application, and after contacting Xamarin Support, they only answered that Xamarin.Forms is not suitable for real life apps yet. They recommended (privately) to develop using Xamarin.IOS and Xamarin.Droid instead. Too bad for Xamarin... if they were more honest about XForms performance we would've saved lot of development time. – I.G. Pascual Nov 12 '14 at 15:56
1

In the setters of the Text and TextColor properties of the FixedLabel class, the code says:

If the new value is "different" from the current one, then do nothing!

It should be with the opposite condition, so that if the new value is the same as the current one, then there is nothing to do.

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