153

Is there a more elegant way to write this code?

What I am doing: I have keys and dates. There can be a number of dates assigned to a key and so I am creating a dictionary of lists of dates to represent this. The following code works fine, but I was hoping for a more elegant and Pythonic method.

dates_dict = dict() 
for key,  date in cur:
    if key in dates_dict:
        dates_dict[key].append(date)
    else:
        dates_dict[key] = [date] 

I was expecting the below to work, but I keep getting a NoneType has no attribute append error.

dates_dict = dict() 
for key,  date in cur:
    dates_dict[key] = dates_dict.get(key, []).append(date) 

This probably has something to do with the fact that

print([].append(1)) 
None 

but why?

4
  • 4
    You should look into collections.defaultdict Oct 14, 2014 at 18:31
  • 2
    you may try using extend() instead of append() Mar 2, 2017 at 3:49
  • 2
    for key, date in cur: - what is cur ?
    – Mawg
    Nov 2, 2018 at 8:09
  • 2
    @Mawg this was a while ago, but I was probably using a cursor object associated with Python's sqlite3 library. Jan 2, 2019 at 23:13

3 Answers 3

246

list.append returns None, since it is an in-place operation and you are assigning it back to dates_dict[key]. So, the next time when you do dates_dict.get(key, []).append you are actually doing None.append. That is why it is failing. Instead, you can simply do

dates_dict.setdefault(key, []).append(date)

But, we have collections.defaultdict for this purpose only. You can do something like this

from collections import defaultdict
dates_dict = defaultdict(list)
for key, date in cur:
    dates_dict[key].append(date)

This will create a new list object, if the key is not found in the dictionary.

Note: Since the defaultdict will create a new list if the key is not found in the dictionary, this will have unintented side-effects. For example, if you simply want to retrieve a value for the key, which is not there, it will create a new list and return it.

5
  • 2
    @chepner: Note that __missing__() is not called for any operations besides __getitem__(). This means that get() will, like normal dictionaries, return None as a default rather than using default_factory i.e., key in dates_dict and dates_dict.get(key) work as expected
    – jfs
    Oct 14, 2014 at 18:49
  • 1
    Just as a followup. I ended up using setdefault as this git me exactly what I wanted without an extra import. Thanks for the help Oct 22, 2014 at 19:45
  • 1
    Your explanation of why [].append returns None doesn't make sense to me. If you are assigning or printing it immediately, why does it matter it is an in-place operation? Why would dates_dict.get(key, []).append yield None unless dates_dict[key] == None?
    – cfwschmidt
    Apr 26, 2016 at 22:16
  • 1
    Exactly! In one of the iterations, the result of append is stored against the key and the same is retrieved with get and appended. But this time it's not a list but None Apr 27, 2016 at 0:14
  • 7
    What's the advantage of using defaultdict over setdefault ? Jul 9, 2016 at 23:15
39

Is there a more elegant way to write this code?

Use collections.defaultdict:

from collections import defaultdict

dates_dict = defaultdict(list)
for key, date in cur:
    dates_dict[key].append(date)
6
  • When I try for key, date_list in dates_dict:, I get error: too many values to unpack (expected 2)
    – Mawg
    Nov 2, 2018 at 8:11
  • 1
    @Mawg look at the code in the answer. I don't see your example there.
    – jfs
    Nov 2, 2018 at 16:49
  • 1
    @Axl Look at the code in the answer and in the comment. Do you see a difference? (note: cur is not the same as dates_dict — they are different objects)
    – jfs
    May 28, 2019 at 14:49
  • 1
    @MawgsaysreinstateMonica Because it's should be for key, date_list in dates_dict.items():
    – Takamura
    Oct 18, 2022 at 13:01
  • 1
    @Takamura: wrong. cur is the input. dates_dict is for the result. It is empty in the beginning. There is no point to iterate over it. The code in the answer is correct as is.
    – jfs
    Oct 18, 2022 at 14:28
7

dates_dict[key] = dates_dict.get(key, []).append(date) sets dates_dict[key] to None as list.append returns None.

In [5]: l = [1,2,3]

In [6]: var = l.append(3)

In [7]: print var
None

You should use collections.defaultdict

import collections
dates_dict = collections.defaultdict(list)
2
  • Yeah, that's what I thought. As there is no value returned. It will return None as default. Thanks Oct 14, 2014 at 18:35
  • @MichaelMurphy, using defaultdict will be the most efficient way to do what you want Oct 14, 2014 at 18:37

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