33

I stumbled recently in this problem

for(int i=0,n=v.size(); i<n; i++) {
   ...
   P2d n = ...   <<<--- error here
}

the compiler was complaining about the fact that the n local variable has been already defined, despite that the open brace looks like it should start a new scope.

Indeed the standard has a special wording for this and while the code compiled fine with g++4.6.3, it complains with more recent versions and other compilers.

What is the rationale (if there is any) behind this special rule?

To be more clear: the standard explains that this is not permitted and I've no questions about the technical reason for which that's an error: I was just wondering why the committee decided to use special extra rules instead of just creating another nested scope when seeing the opening brace (like it happens in other places).

For example to make the code legal you can just wrap the body with two brace pairs instead of one...

Please also note that braces after for/while/if, while considered good practice, are not mandatory and not part of the syntax, but still a scope containing the loop variables exists (therefore using function definition as another example where the scope of the locals is the body of the function is not relevant: a function body is not a statement and braces are mandatory).

In the C++ syntax the body of a for is just a statement; however if this statement happens to be a braced group then it gets a special handling in for/while/if (that doesn't happen when you use a braced group as statement elsewhere in the language).

What is the reason for adding this extra complication to the language? It's apparently not needed and just treating the braces as another inner scope seems (to me) simpler.

Are there use cases in which this simpler and more regular approach doesn't work?

Note that I'm not asking opinions. Either you know why the committee took this decision (requiring also a quite elaborate wording in the standard instead of just having the body as a regular statement with the regular handling of a brace enclosed block when used as statement) or you don't.

EDIT

The "single scope" view for the syntax is for me unnatural but technically possible for the for statement that can be rationalized as a single block with a backward goto statement, but it's hard to defend in a very similar case for the if statement:

if (int x = whatever()) {
    int x = 3; // Illegal
} else {
    int x = 4; // Illegal here too
}

but this is instead legal

if (int x = whatever()) {
    int z = foo();
} else {
    int z = bar();
}

So are the condition, the then part and the else part of an if statement the same scope? No because you can declare two z variables. Are they separate scopes? No because you cannot declare x.

The only rationalization I can see is that the then and else part are indeed separate scopes, but with the added (strange) rule that the variable declared in the condition cannot be declared in the scope. Why this extra strange limitation rule is present is what I'm asking about.

22
  • 6
    Are you basically asking "why aren't there two nested scopes here?" Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:15
  • 11
    I'm curious to see how many answers are posted by someone who actually reads the question (since you clearly acknowledge you're aware it doesn't work, noting the relevant standard content et'al).
    – WhozCraig
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:20
  • 1
    @OliverCharlesworth: you've one scope already (for example you can put a statement without braces). The question is why not handling braces normally by creating a new scope instead of adding a special rule...
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:20
  • 4
    @DavidHeffernan: what is chaotic about just treating the body as any other statement in the language (i.e. starting a nested scope if it's a braced group)?
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:34
  • 6
    I added the C tag. Not many questions deserve both C and C++ tags, but here it seems appropriate. @OliverCharlesworth's "because C says so" response naturally leads to the question why C does say so.
    – MSalters
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:48

8 Answers 8

19
int i = 0;
for (MyObject o1; i<10; i++) {
   MyObject o2;
}

Can be translated from the point view of recent compilers into:

int i = 0;
{
    MyObject o1;
    Label0:
    MyObject o2; //o2 will be destroyed and reconstructed 10 times, while being with the same scope as o1
    i++;
    if (i < 10)
        goto Label0;
}

This is the answer to your last question mark at the end, they didn't add something complicated, just used goto to label in the same scope, and not goto to out of the scope and then enter to it again. I don't see clear reason why it's better. (While it will do some incompatibility with older codes)

4
  • +1: True. I didn't know jumping backward before an object definition was legal. I removed the example because it's indeed irrelevant (can be seen as a single scope with a goto). Why not simply saying the body i s a statement (with possibily a nested scope if you use braces) is a question still to be answered IMO.
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:43
  • @6502 Then this answer now is irrelevant? (Whatever to delete it or not)
    – KugBuBu
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:44
  • I think it's ok. It's just showing that the single-scope view is not impossible (it's just, in my opinion, more complex).
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:45
  • @6502 OK, if I will find some source why they changed it I will put an edit at the end of this post.
    – KugBuBu
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:50
18

The semantics are not special for the for loop! if (bool b = foo()) { } works the same. The odd one out is really a { } block on its own. That would be rather useless if it didn't introduce a new scope. So the apparent inconsistency is due to a misplaced generalization from an exceptional case.

[edit] An alternative view would be to consider an hypothetical, optional keyword:

// Not a _conditional_ statement theoretically, but grammatically identical
always()
{
    Foo();
}

This unifies the rules, and you wouldn't expect three scope (inside, intermediate,outside) here either.

[edit 2] (please don't make this a moving target to answer)

You wonder about lifetime and scopes (two different things) in

int i = 0;
for (MyObject o1; i<10; i++) {
   MyObject o2;
}

Let's generalize that:

MyObject o2; // Outer scope
int i = 0;
for (MyObject o1; i<o1.fooCount(); i++) {
   std::cout << o2.asString();
   MyObject o2;
}

Clearly the call to o2.asString() refers to the outer o2, in all iterations. It's not like the inner o2 survives the loop iteration. Name lookup doesn't will use names from the outer scope when the names aren't yet defined in the inner scope - and "not yet defined" is a compile-time thing. The repeated construction and destruction of the inner o2 is a runtime thing.

9
  • I'm not sure I understand this answer. {} introducing a scope is the exceptional and odd case and if/for/while is instead the common regular case?
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:51
  • Yes, do you object to such an interpretation? :) After all, how often do you see a new block introduced by {} alone?
    – jrok
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:52
  • And perhaps more importantly, how often do you see a naked { } for purposes other than to introduce a local scope? In comparison, it's very common to see redundant {} in if (Bar) { Foo(); }.
    – MSalters
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 9:01
  • Not quite correct, the "odd one out" is any block inside another block, whether it's lonely or whether it's introduced by an if or a for or whatever.
    – user541686
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 9:17
  • 2
    @MSalters: the INNER o2 is destroyed when the scope containing it is exited. But it's the same scope where o1 is contained in, yet o1 is not destroyed. Is the flow exiting that scope or not? Why was all this special handling for braces following a for considered important? This is the question. What are the use cases that justify this added logical complexity?
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:19
5

Look at it this way:
A pair of braces allows you to hide variables visible inside an enclosing pair of braces (or globally):

void foo(int n)
{
    // the containing block
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        int n = 5;  // allowed: n is visible inside the containing { }
        int i = 5;  // not allowed: i is NOT visible inside the containing { }
    }
}

If you think about it this way you realize there are no special rules here.

4

The brackets ({}) deliminate a section of code as a block. Everything in this block is within it's own local scope:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
   int a  = 5;
   std::cout<<a<<std::endl      // 5
   {
       int a = 10;
       std::cout<<a<<std::endl  //10
   }
  std::cout<<a<<std::endl       // 5
}

But wait, there is something else in that code...

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
}

This is similar to the structure of a for loop:

for (int i = 0 ; i < 5; i++)
{
}

The function definition has code outside the {...} block too!
in this case, argc and argv are defined, and they are local to the scope of the function just like the definition of i in the above for loop.

In fact you can generalise the syntax to:

definition { expression }

Where the entirety of the above is within the scope.
In this case, the 'raw' brackets ({}) form the same structure but with an empty definition statement.

edit: to answer your edit, in:

int i = 0;
for (MyObject o1; i<10; i++) {
   MyObject o2;
}

the constructor for o2 is looped over for each loop, while the the constructor for o1 isn't.

for loop behavior goes as follows (where XXX is the current block being executed:

  1. init
    for(XXX; ; ){ }
  2. test loop exp
    for( ;XXX; ){ }
  3. execute block
    for( ; ; ){XXX}
  4. final operation
    for( ; ;XXX){ }
  5. Back to 2.
5
  • The thing is that for (int i) and {int i} became the same scope, like it's int i; int i; in recent compiler's versions and not {int i;{int i;}} like it was before. (Which compiles without errors)
    – KugBuBu
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 9:51
  • See my answer, I just posted it. They changed the way for works. (And I show there to what they changed it to there)
    – KugBuBu
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:01
  • Because of that I said to you that you didn't read enough :), this question is about this.
    – KugBuBu
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:14
  • OK, so all that is wrong is that I didn't discuss why it compiled correctly in previous compiler versions?
    – Baldrickk
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:19
  • No, the question is why add such rule. Better read it you lazy bastard. :D
    – KugBuBu
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 10:25
2

As there is there was the tag I would answer from that perspective. Here is an example:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    int a[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8};

    for (int i = 0, n = 8; i < n; i++) {
        int n = 100;
        printf("%d %d\n", n, a[i]);
    }

    return 0;
}

It compiles without issues, see it working at ideone (C99 strict mode, 4.8.1).

C standard is clear that both scopes are considered as separate, N1570 6.8.5/p5 (emphasis mine):

An iteration statement is a block whose scope is a strict subset of the scope of its enclosing block. The loop body is also a block whose scope is a strict subset of the scope of the iteration statement.

There is a warning, but only with the -Wshadow option, as expected:

$ gcc -std=c99 -pedantic -Wall -Wextra -Wshadow check.c
check.c: In function ‘main’:
check.c:7: warning: declaration of ‘n’ shadows a previous local
check.c:6: warning: shadowed declaration is here
1
  • I didn't put a C tag. Someone else did.
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 9:08
2

The loop control variables (i and n in this case) are considered part of the for loop. And since they are already declared in the loop's initialization statement, most attempts (other than re-defining by using nested braces) to re-define them within the loop results in an error!

1
  • It was observed that you can redefine the variables within the loop if you do so within a second set of nested braces. It's not clear to me that any attempt to redefine n results in an error, only that some attempts do. (In practice, I suspect you can say "most" rather than just "some.")
    – David K
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 19:22
1

I cannot tell you why there is just one scope opened by the for loop, not a second one due to the braces. But I can say what was given back then as the reason for changing where that single scope is: Locality. Take this kind of pretty standard code:

void foo(int n) {
  int s=0;
  for (int i=0; i<n; ++i) {
    s += global[i];
  }
  // ... more code ...
  for (int i=0; i<n; ++i) {
    global[i]--;
  }
}

Under the old rules, that would have been illegal code, defining i twice in the same scope, the function. (In C back then, it was even illegal because you had to declare variables at the beginning of the block.)

That usually meant you’d leave out the declaration in the second loop – and run into problems if the code with the first loop was removed. And whatever you did, you had variables with a long time to live, which as usual makes reasoning about your code harder. (That was before everyone and their brother started to consider ten lines a long function.) Changing for to start its own scope before the variable declaration here made code much easier to maintain.

4
  • That locality is important is absolutely clear. In the old days when MS compilers (despite the standardization) were not following this rule my code was using the #define for if(0)else for trick to be able to get a local scope to wrap for variables. This is however totally irrelevant with the question. Note that the extra special wording for for/if/while removes locality... and I don't understand why that was considered necessary.
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:39
  • I don’t see how this removes locality. All I can see is that the scope of the block has been changed to include the “for (a;b;c)” part. Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 15:16
  • As you can see in the edited question the idea of a single scope encompassing the statement can be used as an explanation for the rules of for, but requires you to think in terms of goto and also cannot be defended at all for the very same issue in the if statement where clearly you cannot think to a single scope (because you can declare the same variable twice) but you cannot use the idea of separate scopes (because you cannot redeclare x). The rule forces the outside definition inside the body statement (in case it's a block), forbidding a local declaration with the same name.
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 20, 2014 at 20:16
  • True, if is a bit weird in its scoping. Commented Oct 20, 2014 at 20:44
-2

You problem is that the definition part of the for is considered inside the scope of the for.

         // V one definition
for(int i=0,n=v.size(); i<n; i++) {
   ...
    // V second definition
   P2d n = ...   <<<--- error here
}
1
  • That there is an error is clear. The explanation in the standard is also a bit complex but reasonable. What is not clear is WHY they don't handle the braces normally instead creating a new inner scope... in other words why there is a special rule for that.
    – 6502
    Commented Oct 15, 2014 at 8:19

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