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I have a branch called master and another called dev. Usually, I do tests and improvements on dev, and when decided it is OK, I merge it into master, then tagging and release new version of the application. I met two cases of merging:

  1. merge master into dev, and
  2. merge dev into master,

but I am not really sure how the two are different... Any explanation would be welcome.

  • 2
    Merging one branch into another is not a symmetric operation; merging master into dev is different from merging dev into master. Follow this example and the difference should become clear: stackoverflow.com/questions/25933056/… – jubobs Oct 15 '14 at 13:48
  • 2
    With merge master, you advance the dev branch. – raina77ow Oct 15 '14 at 13:49
  • master branch in GIT is a generic name which means that this is a MAIN branch that is used as a TRUNK in SVN, you can mark your Dev like your master branch but not vice versa, each time you need to start new development iteration you to need create new branch using master and when you finish this iteration you also need to merge or rebase your changes into master branch, you Dev is just one of the iterations in your development cycle – Anonymous Oct 15 '14 at 14:16
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TL;DR

The main difference lies in where the master and dev branches end up pointing. enter image description here

Full explanation

Merging one branch into another is not a symmetric operation:

  • merging dev into master, and
  • merging master into dev,

are, in general, not equivalent. Here is an illustrative example that explains the difference between the two. Let's assume your repo looks as follows:

enter image description here

If you merge dev into master

If master is checked out (git checkout master),

enter image description here

and you then merge dev (git merge dev), you will end up in the following situation:

enter image description here

The master branch now points to the new merge commit (F), whereas dev still points to the same commit (E) as it did before the merge.

If you merge master into dev

If, on the other hand, dev is checked out (git checkout dev),

enter image description here

and you then merge master (git merge master), you will end up in the following situation:

enter image description here

The dev branch now points to the new merge commit (F', whereas master still points to the same commit as it did before the merge (D).

Putting it all together

enter image description here

  • 3
    So by "not symmetric" you just mean that the branch pointers point to different commits after the merge? Because imho the commits F and F' should be the same (content-wise, not necessarily SHA-1-wise). – musiKk Oct 15 '14 at 14:25
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    @musiKk Yes that's what I mean. I use different names for F and F' because F' is F's evil twin from a parallel universe, and would have a different SHA1 from F's. – jubobs Oct 15 '14 at 14:35
  • 1
    Alright! Btw what do you use do draw the slick images? They look suspiciously like the images from Pro Git... – musiKk Oct 15 '14 at 14:41
  • @musiKk Nah! I wrote a little LaTeX package for that, and I drew inspiration from the style of the diagrams in the Pro Git book. – jubobs Oct 15 '14 at 14:43
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    @Jubobs - I realize you hedge your addendum slightly, but you might want to explicitly point out the parents are reversed in the two scenarios. – Andrew C Oct 15 '14 at 14:57

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