200

By following this guide I created a Cargo project.

src/main.rs

fn main() {
    hello::print_hello();
}

mod hello {
    pub fn print_hello() {
        println!("Hello, world!");
    }
}

which I run using

cargo build && cargo run

and it compiles without errors. Now I'm trying to split the main module in two but cannot figure out how to include a module from another file.

My project tree looks like this

├── src
    ├── hello.rs
    └── main.rs

and the content of the files:

src/main.rs

use hello;

fn main() {
    hello::print_hello();
}

src/hello.rs

mod hello {
    pub fn print_hello() {
        println!("Hello, world!");
    }
}

When I compile it with cargo build I get

error[E0432]: unresolved import `hello`
 --> src/main.rs:1:5
  |
1 | use hello;
  |     ^^^^^ no `hello` external crate

I tried to follow the compiler's suggestions and modified main.rs to:

#![feature(globs)]

extern crate hello;

use hello::*;

fn main() {
    hello::print_hello();
}

But this still doesn't help much, now I get this:

error[E0463]: can't find crate for `hello`
 --> src/main.rs:3:1
  |
3 | extern crate hello;
  | ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ can't find crate

Is there a trivial example of how to include one module from the current project into the project's main file?

2
319

You don't need the mod hello in your hello.rs file. Code in any file but the crate root (main.rs for executables, lib.rs for libraries) is automatically namespaced in a module.

To include the code from hello.rs in your main.rs, use mod hello;. It gets expanded to the code that is in hello.rs (exactly as you had before). Your file structure continues the same, and your code needs to be slightly changed:

main.rs:

mod hello;

fn main() {
    hello::print_hello();
}

hello.rs:

pub fn print_hello() {
    println!("Hello, world!");
}
3
  • 6
    Late Question wouldn't it also work if I specify it with use hello instead of mod hello?! Sep 16 '15 at 17:23
  • 33
    @ChristianSchmitt No, they are different things. use is just a namespace thing, while mod pulls in the file. You would use use, for example, to be able to call the print_hello function without having to prefix with the namespace Sep 16 '15 at 19:08
  • @RenatoZannon this should be another question ! Apr 1 at 6:54
58

If you wish to have nested modules...

Rust 2018

It's no longer required to have the file mod.rs (although it is still supported). The idiomatic alternative is to name the file the name of the module:

$ tree src
src
├── main.rs
├── my
│   ├── inaccessible.rs
│   └── nested.rs
└── my.rs

main.rs

mod my;

fn main() {
    my::function();
}

my.rs

pub mod nested; // if you need to include other modules

pub fn function() {
    println!("called `my::function()`");
}

Rust 2015

You need to put a mod.rs file inside your folder of the same name as your module. Rust by Example explains it better.

$ tree src
src
├── main.rs
└── my
    ├── inaccessible.rs
    ├── mod.rs
    └── nested.rs

main.rs

mod my;

fn main() {
    my::function();
}

mod.rs

pub mod nested; // if you need to include other modules

pub fn function() {
    println!("called `my::function()`");
}
4
  • 7
    Suppose I wanted to use something from inaccessible.rs in nested.rs... how would I do that? Jun 30 '19 at 20:00
  • 2
    To access a sibling .rs file from a file other than main.rs, use the path attribute. So, at the top of nested.rs, add the following: #[path = "inaccessible.rs"] and on the next line: mod inaccessible;
    – Gardener
    Jul 24 '19 at 11:26
  • @Gandhi See The path attribute
    – Gardener
    Jul 24 '19 at 11:41
  • 3
    @HemanGandhi add mod inaccessible; to my/mod.rs to make it submodule of my, then access sibling module from nested.rs by relative path super::inaccessible::function(). you dont need path attribute here.
    – artin
    Nov 14 '19 at 15:59
28

I really like Gardener's response. I've been using the suggestion for my module declarations. Someone please chime in if there is a technical issue with this.

./src
├── main.rs
├── other_utils
│   └── other_thing.rs
└── utils
    └── thing.rs

main.rs

#[path = "utils/thing.rs"] mod thing;
#[path = "other_utils/other_thing.rs"] mod other_thing;

fn main() {
  thing::foo();
  other_thing::bar();
}

utils/thing.rs

pub fn foo() {
  println!("foo");
}

other_utils/other_thing.rs

#[path = "../utils/thing.rs"] mod thing;

pub fn bar() {
  println!("bar");
  thing::foo();
}
4
  • 1
    Had to use this 'trick' to reexport fn with same name as the file it was in. #[path = "./add_offer.rs"] mod _add_offer; pub use self::_add_offer::add_offer;
    – Arek Bal
    May 4 '20 at 0:10
  • As a Rust newbie, it's a bit disturbing that such a simple concept (importing other bits of code) requires so much research. Plus the #[path..] syntax is ugly Aug 6 at 7:19
  • 2
    This is misleading, the #[path = ...] attribute should not be used except in obscure cases, and certainly not by newbies. Each time you do mod thing, it creates a new module, even if #[path = ...] makes them point to the same file. Meaning in this sample, there are two separate thing modules declared: crate::thing and crate::other_thing::thing. Its likely not an issue here since it only includes a function, but if you define types, it can lead to confusion when the compiler reports "expected mod1::A, found mod2::A".
    – kmdreko
    Aug 25 at 21:21
  • Please use the standard mechanisms. If you really want this file structure without intermediate mod.rs files, you can declare them in main.rs like mod other_utils { pub mod other_thing; } and mod utils { pub mod thing; }. Then you can access them like crate::other_utils::other_thing and crate::utils::thing.
    – kmdreko
    Aug 25 at 21:22

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