3532

Can I convert a string representing a boolean value (e.g., 'true', 'false') into an intrinsic type in JavaScript?

I have a hidden form in HTML that is updated based on a user's selection within a list. This form contains some fields which represent boolean values and are dynamically populated with an intrinsic boolean value. However, once this value is placed into the hidden input field it becomes a string.

The only way I could find to determine the field's boolean value, once it was converted into a string, was to depend upon the literal value of its string representation.

var myValue = document.myForm.IS_TRUE.value;
var isTrueSet = myValue == 'true';

Is there a better way to accomplish this?

18
  • 110
    "Is there a better way to accomplish this?" - there is certainly a worse way :D string=(string==String(string?true:false))?(string?true:false):(!string?true:fa‌​lse); Apr 16, 2015 at 10:25
  • 14
    Easily handle strings and bools: function parseBool(val) { return val === true || val === "true" } Sep 10, 2015 at 14:24
  • 3
    @Mark function checkBool(x) { if(x) {return true;} else {return false;} }
    – Sebi
    Nov 29, 2016 at 15:10
  • 4
    @Sebi: You forgot to document it: if (checkBool(x) != false) { ... } else { ... } Nov 29, 2016 at 18:21
  • 9
    !!(parseInt(value) || value === "true") Feb 22, 2017 at 3:58

107 Answers 107

8

Like @Shadow2531 said, you can't just convert it directly. I'd also suggest that you consider string inputs besides "true" and "false" that are 'truthy' and 'falsey' if your code is going to be reused/used by others. This is what I use:

function parseBoolean(string) {
  switch (String(string).toLowerCase()) {
    case "true":
    case "1":
    case "yes":
    case "y":
      return true;
    case "false":
    case "0":
    case "no":
    case "n":
      return false;
    default:
      //you could throw an error, but 'undefined' seems a more logical reply
      return undefined;
  }
}
8

I'm a little late, but I have a little snippet to do this, it essentially maintains all of JScripts truthey/falsey/filthy-ness but includes "false" as an acceptible value for false.

I prefer this method to the ones mentioned because it doesn't rely on a 3rd party to parse the code (i.e: eval/JSON.parse), which is overkill in my mind, it's short enough to not require a utility function and maintains other truthey/falsey conventions.

var value = "false";
var result = (value == "false") != Boolean(value);

// value = "true"  => result = true
// value = "false" => result = false
// value = true    => result = true
// value = false   => result = false
// value = null    => result = false
// value = []      => result = true
// etc..
8

Holy god some of these answers are just wild. I love JS and its infinite number of ways to skin a bool.

My preference, which I was shocked not to see already, is:

testVar = testVar.toString().match(/^(true|[1-9][0-9]*|[0-9]*[1-9]+|yes)$/i) ? true : false;
0
7

My take on this question is that it aims to satisfy three objectives:

  • Return true/false for truthy and falsey values, but also return true/false for multiple string values that would be truthy or falsey if they were Booleans instead of strings.
  • Second, provide a resilient interface so that values other than those specified will not fail, but rather return a default value
  • Third, do all this with as little code as possible.

The problem with using JSON is that it fails by causing a Javascript error. This solution is not resilient (though it satisfies 1 and 3):

JSON.parse("FALSE") // fails

This solution is not concise enough:

if(value === "TRUE" || value === "yes" || ...) { return true; }

I am working on solving this exact problem for Typecast.js. And the best solution to all three objectives is this one:

return /^true$/i.test(v);

It works for many cases, does not fail when values like {} are passed in, and is very concise. Also it returns false as the default value rather than undefined or throwing an Error, which is more useful in loosely-typed Javascript development. Bravo to the other answers that suggested it!

2
  • Just to go back to your objectives, the only problem with your third & best solution is that it does not meet Objective #1 - it will only return true for a value of 'true', but not for any truthy input. In order to make it meet Objective #1, it is only slightly more concise than Solution #2, and far less readable.
    – JMTyler
    May 9, 2013 at 18:27
  • return /^(true|yes|1|t|y)$/i.test(str); Jul 8, 2016 at 20:10
7

The simplest way which I always use:

let value = 'true';
let output = value === 'true';
4
  • 4
    Ternary operator is not necesary. Only with let output = value === 'true' works.
    – zeross
    Jun 6, 2019 at 8:05
  • let value = 'true'; let output = value === 'true' ? true : false; output = true; let value = 'false'; let output = value === 'true' ? true : false; output = false; What is not working here?
    – panatoni
    Jun 7, 2019 at 12:59
  • 1
    Sorry, it has been a missunderstanding. That works perfectly, but it's redundant. value === 'true' already returns a boolean value and ternary operator is not necesary.
    – zeross
    Jun 7, 2019 at 13:35
  • 1
    Yeah sure you are right, I edited my answered - my fault ;]
    – panatoni
    Aug 16, 2019 at 21:03
6

I wrote a function to match PHP's filter_var which does this nicely. Available in a gist: https://gist.github.com/CMCDragonkai/7389368

/**
 * Parses mixed type values into booleans. This is the same function as filter_var in PHP using boolean validation
 * @param  {Mixed}        value 
 * @param  {Boolean}      nullOnFailure = false
 * @return {Boolean|Null}
 */
var parseBooleanStyle = function(value, nullOnFailure = false){
    switch(value){
        case true:
        case 'true':
        case 1:
        case '1':
        case 'on':
        case 'yes':
            value = true;
            break;
        case false:
        case 'false':
        case 0:
        case '0':
        case 'off':
        case 'no':
            value = false;
            break;
        default:
            if(nullOnFailure){
                value = null;
            }else{
                value = false;
            }
            break;
    }
    return value;
};
1
  • yours was almost what I was looking for. Here's my variation: ``` function parseBool( value, nullOnFailure = false ) { let value2 = parseFloat( value ) if( !isNaN( value2 )) return !!value2 if( typeof value !== 'string' ) return !!value switch( value.trim().toLowerCase() ) { case 't': case 'true': case 'on': case 'y': case 'yes': return true case 'f': case 'false': case 'off': case 'n': case 'no': return false default: return nullOnFailure ? null : false } } ```
    – royce3
    Jan 31, 2022 at 18:43
6

I use an own method which includes a check if the object exists first and a more intuitive conversion to boolean:

function str2bool(strvalue){
  return (strvalue && typeof strvalue == 'string') ? (strvalue.toLowerCase() == 'true' || strvalue == '1') : (strvalue == true);
}

The results are:

var test; // false
var test2 = null; // false
var test3 = 'undefined'; // false
var test4 = 'true'; // true
var test5 = 'false'; // false
var test6 = true; // true
var test7 = false; // false
var test8 = 1; // true
var test9 = 0; // false
var test10 = '1'; // true
var test11 = '0'; // false

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/av5xcj6s/

0
6

const boolTrue = JSON.parse("true")
const boolFalse = JSON.parse("false")


console.log(boolTrue) // true
console.log(boolFalse) // false

To convert string boolean like "true" to actually boolean value is just wrapping to JSON.parse() example: JSON.parse("true")

6
function isTrue(val) {
    try {
        return !!JSON.parse(val);
    } catch {
        return false;
    }
}
1
  • This is the one I use. Yes you could attempt to widen the net and support more values but how far do you go? So "TRUE" should return true? What about "tRuE". Or "yes". Or "Y". And why stick to just English - maybe the French "oui" should return true?? where does it end? This answer lets javascript itself make the decision
    – kiwichris
    Nov 7, 2022 at 8:43
6

Dead-simple, best performing and strict

Best performance according to https://stackoverflow.com/a/28588344/7333766

Type safe and strict answer (great if you want to enforce stricter rules on your inputs) that I did not see in all other answers, also gives you a clear explanation in the console when it gets an incorrect input:

Typescript version:

function parseBool(value: any):boolean {
  if (value === 'true') return true
  if (value === 'false') return false
  console.error('parseBool got an unexpected value:', value, '(accepted values : "true", "false")')
  throw new Error('Error: parseBool got unexpected value')
}

Arrow function version:

const parseBool = (value: any):boolean => {
  if (value === 'true') return true
  if (value === 'false') return false
  console.error('parseBool got an unexpected value:', value, '(accepted values : "true", "false")')
  throw new Error('Error: parseBool got unexpected value')
}

Javascript version:

function parseBool(value){
  if (value === 'true') return true
  if (value === 'false') return false
  console.error('parseBool got an unexpected value:', value, '(accepted values : "true", "false")')
  throw new Error('Error: parseBool got unexpected value')
}
3
  • 1
    You should consider normal Boolean values also in the function in case they are passed to the function. Jun 7, 2023 at 10:41
  • You may also want to consider using .toLowerCase to ensure you comparing the same cases, if it's case-insensitive. Jul 12, 2023 at 13:20
  • you can add JSX use case <input checkbox={jsonResponse.value==="true"?true:false} /> which comes handy in mapping of retrieved json from API in your JSX Oct 25, 2023 at 13:57
5
function parseBool(value) {
    if (typeof value === "boolean") return value;

    if (typeof value === "number") {
        return value === 1 ? true : value === 0 ? false : undefined;
    }

    if (typeof value != "string") return undefined;

    return value.toLowerCase() === 'true' ? true : false;
}
1
  • For a string, I personnally would have returned true for "true" like you did, but false for "false" only, and undefined otherwise. Sort of what you previously made with the integer case. Mar 24, 2015 at 17:06
5

Lots of fancy answers here. Really surprised no one has posted this solution:

var booleanVal = toCast > '';

This resolves to true in most cases other than bool false, number zero and empty string (obviously). You can easily look for other falsey string values after the fact e.g.:

var booleanVal = toCast > '' && toCast != 'false' && toCast != '0';  
5
String(true).toLowerCase() == 'true'; // true
String("true").toLowerCase() == 'true'; // true
String("True").toLowerCase() == 'true'; // true
String("TRUE").toLowerCase() == 'true'; // true

String(false).toLowerCase() == 'true'; // false

If you are not sure of the input, the above works for boolean and as well any string.

1
  • Or true.toString()==='true'. Also, why are you making String(true) and String('true') lowercase? lol Sep 6, 2019 at 19:07
5

If you are certain that the test subject is always a string, then explicitly checking that it equals true is your best bet.

You may want to consider including an extra bit of code just in case the subject could actually a boolean.

var isTrueSet =
    myValue === true ||
    myValue != null &&
    myValue.toString().toLowerCase() === 'true';

This could save you a bit of work in the future if the code gets improved/refactored to use actual boolean values instead of strings.

4

If there's some other code that's converting the boolean value to a string, you need to know exactly how that code stores true/false values. Either that or you need to have access to a function that reverses that conversion.

There are infinitely many ways to represent boolean values in strings ("true", "Y", "1", etc.). So you shouldn't rely on some general-purpose string-to-boolean converter, like Boolean(myValue). You need to use a routine that reverses the original boolean-to-string conversion, whatever that is.

If you know that it converts true booleans to "true" strings, then your sample code is fine. Except that you should use === instead of ==, so there's no automatic type conversion.

4

I've found that using '1' and an empty value '' for boolean values works far more predictably than 'true' or 'false' string values... specifically with html forms since uninitialized/empty values in Dom elements will consistently evaluate to false whereas any value within them evaluates to true.

For instance:

<input type='button' onclick='this.value = tog(this.value);' />

<script type="text/javascript">

    function tog(off) {
        if(off) {
            alert('true, toggle to false');
            return '';
        } else {
            alert('false, toggle to true');
            return '1';
        }
    }   
</script>

Just seemed like an easier road, so far it's been very consistent/easy... perhaps someone can determine a way to break this?

4

@guinaps> Any string which isn't the empty string will evaluate to true by using them.

How about using the String.match() method

var str="true";
var boolStr=Boolean(str.match(/^true$/i)); 

this alone won't get the 1/0 or the yes/no, but it will catch the TRUE/true, as well, it will return false for any string that happens to have "true" as a substring.

EDIT

Below is a function to handle true/false, 1/0, yes/no (case-insensitive)

​function stringToBool(str) {
    var bool;
    if (str.match(/^(true|1|yes)$/i) !== null) {
        bool = true;
    } else if (str.match(/^(false|0|no)*$/i) !== null) {
        bool = false;
    } else {
        bool = null;
        if (console) console.log('"' + str + '" is not a boolean value');
    }
    return bool;
}

stringToBool('1'); // true
stringToBool('No'); // false
stringToBool('falsey'); // null ("falsey" is not a boolean value.)
stringToBool(''); // false
1
  • As written (on 2018 Dec 19 at 16:00 Z), /^(false|0|no)*$/i will match an empty string (which may be the intent) but also matches any number false, 0, or no, for instance "0falseno0nofalse0" will also evaluate to false but should evaluate to null and output a console message that it is not a Boolean value.
    – Zarepheth
    Dec 19, 2018 at 16:02
4

I do this, which will handle 1=TRUE=yes=YES=true, 0=FALSE=no=NO=false:

BOOL=false
if (STRING)
  BOOL=JSON.parse(STRING.toLowerCase().replace('no','false').replace('yes','true'));

Replace STRING with the name of your string variable.

If it's not null, a numerical value or one of these strings: "true", "TRUE", "false", "FALSE", "yes", "YES", "no", "NO" It will throw an error (intentionally.)

1
  • JSON.parse is able to handle parsing 'true' and 'false' to Boolean values, so you don't need to wrap it in Boolean().
    – whitfin
    Jan 27, 2015 at 10:52
4

In nodejs by using node-boolify it is possible

Boolean Conversion Results

Boolify(true); //true
Boolify('true'); //true
Boolify('TRUE'); //null
Boolify(1); //true
Boolify(2); //null
Boolify(false); //false
Boolify('false'); //false
Boolify('FALSE'); //null
Boolify(0); //false
Boolify(null); //null
Boolify(undefined); //null
Boolify(); //null
Boolify(''); //null
3
  • 7
    I'd rather not introduce a new dependency to the project just for converting a string to a boolean. Feb 25, 2019 at 15:50
  • It is very light weight and also u can validate whether string is boolean Feb 26, 2019 at 3:32
  • For such a simple task, a library would not be desirable especially when the library controls how a boolean is defined.
    – Dan
    Jan 11, 2021 at 17:21
4

The most simple way is

a = 'True';
a = !!a && ['1', 'true', 1, true].indexOf(a.toLowerCase()) > -1;
1
  • Here's mine function boolify(value = false) { return ["true", "1", "yes", "y", "on"].indexOf(String(value).toLowerCase()) != -1; } May 1, 2020 at 18:59
4
/// Convert something to boolean
function toBoolean( o ) {
    if ( null !== o ) {
        let t = typeof o;
        if ( "undefined" !== typeof o ) {
            if ( "string" !== t ) return !!o;
            o = o.toLowerCase().trim();
            return "true" === o || "1" === o;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

toBoolean(false) --> false
toBoolean(true) --> true
toBoolean("false") --> false
toBoolean("true") --> true
toBoolean("TRue") --> true
toBoolean("1") --> true
toBoolean("0") --> false
toBoolean(1) --> true
toBoolean(0) --> false
toBoolean(123.456) --> true
toBoolean(0.0) --> false
toBoolean("") --> false
toBoolean(null) --> false
toBoolean() --> false
1
  • this is so awesome and useful - thank you so much! Jan 28, 2021 at 22:23
4

It would be great if there was a function on the String object that did this for us, but we can easily add our own prototypes to extend the String object.

Add this code somewhere in your project before you use it.

String.prototype.toBoolean = function() {
   return String(this.valueOf()).toLowerCase() === true.toString();
};

Try it out like this:

var myValue = "false"
console.log("Bool is " + myValue.toBoolean())
console.log("Bool is " + "False".toBoolean())
console.log("Bool is " + "FALSE".toBoolean())
console.log("Bool is " + "TRUE".toBoolean())
console.log("Bool is " + "true".toBoolean())
console.log("Bool is " + "True".toBoolean())

So the result of the original question would then be:

var myValue = document.myForm.IS_TRUE.value;
var isTrueSet = myValue.toBoolean();
1
  • Boolean.prototype is fully supported in all browsers Sep 30, 2021 at 19:06
3
if (String(a) == "true"){
  //true block
} else {
  //false block
}
3

i wrote a helper function that handles your cases (and some more). Feel free to alter it to your specific needs

/**
 * @example
 * <code>
 * var pageRequestParams = {'enableFeatureX': 'true'};
 * toBool(pageRequestParams.enableFeatureX);  // returns true
 *
 * toBool(pageRequestParams.enableFeatureY, true, options.enableFeatureY)
 * </code>
 * @param {*}value
 * @param {Boolean}[mapEmptyStringToTrue=false]
 * @param {Boolean}[defaultVal=false] this is returned if value is undefined.
 *
 * @returns {Boolean}
 * @example
 * <code>
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': ''        }.enableFeatureX);          // false
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': ''        }.enableFeatureX, true);    // true
 * toBool({                            }.enableFeatureX, true);    // false
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 0         }.enableFeatureX);          // false
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': '0'       }.enableFeatureX);          // false
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': '0 '      }.enableFeatureX);          // false
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 'false'   }.enableFeatureX);          // false
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 'falsE '  }.enableFeatureX);          // false
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 'no'      }.enableFeatureX);          // false
 *
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 1         }.enableFeatureX);          // true
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': '-2'      }.enableFeatureX);          // true
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 'true'    }.enableFeatureX);          // true
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 'false_'  }.enableFeatureX);          // true
 * toBool({'enableFeatureX': 'john doe'}.enableFeatureX);          // true
 * </code>
 *
 */
var toBool = function (value, mapEmptyStringToTrue, defaultVal) {
    if (value === undefined) {return Boolean(defaultVal); }
    mapEmptyStringToTrue = mapEmptyStringToTrue !== undefined ? mapEmptyStringToTrue : false; // default to false
    var strFalseValues = ['0', 'false', 'no'].concat(!mapEmptyStringToTrue ? [''] : []);
    if (typeof value === 'string') {
        return (strFalseValues.indexOf(value.toLowerCase().trim()) === -1);
    }
    // value is likely null, boolean, or number
    return Boolean(value);
};
3

Here is my 1 liner submission: I needed to evaluate a string and output, true if 'true', false if 'false' and a number if anything like '-12.35673'.

val = 'false';

val = /^false$/i.test(val) ? false : ( /^true$/i.test(val) ? true : val*1 ? val*1 : val );
3

Simple solution i have been using it for a while

function asBoolean(value) {

    return (''+value) === 'true'; 

}


// asBoolean(true) ==> true
// asBoolean(false) ==> false
// asBoolean('true') ==> true
// asBoolean('false') ==> false
3

The fastest safe way to convert a string to a boolean in one line of code

One of features that help to fasten the code execution in Javascript is Short-Circuit Evaluation:

As logical expressions are evaluated left to right, they are tested for possible "short-circuit" evaluation using the following rules:

  • false && (anything) is short-circuit evaluated to false.
  • true || (anything) is short-circuit evaluated to true.

So that if you want to test a string value for being true of false in JSON.parse way of test and keep the performance strong, you may use the || operator to exclude the slow code from execution in case the test value is of boolean type.

test === true || ['true','yes','1'].indexOf(test.toString().toLowerCase()) > -1

As the Array.prototype.indexOf() method is a part of ECMA-262 standard in the 5th edition, you may need a polyfill for the old browsers support.

// Production steps of ECMA-262, Edition 5, 15.4.4.14
// Reference: http://es5.github.io/#x15.4.4.14
if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function(searchElement, fromIndex) {

    var k;

    // 1. Let O be the result of calling ToObject passing
    //    the this value as the argument.
    if (this == null) {
      throw new TypeError('"this" is null or not defined');
    }

    var O = Object(this);

    // 2. Let lenValue be the result of calling the Get
    //    internal method of O with the argument "length".
    // 3. Let len be ToUint32(lenValue).
    var len = O.length >>> 0;

    // 4. If len is 0, return -1.
    if (len === 0) {
      return -1;
    }

    // 5. If argument fromIndex was passed let n be
    //    ToInteger(fromIndex); else let n be 0.
    var n = +fromIndex || 0;

    if (Math.abs(n) === Infinity) {
      n = 0;
    }

    // 6. If n >= len, return -1.
    if (n >= len) {
      return -1;
    }

    // 7. If n >= 0, then Let k be n.
    // 8. Else, n<0, Let k be len - abs(n).
    //    If k is less than 0, then let k be 0.
    k = Math.max(n >= 0 ? n : len - Math.abs(n), 0);

    // 9. Repeat, while k < len
    while (k < len) {
      // a. Let Pk be ToString(k).
      //   This is implicit for LHS operands of the in operator
      // b. Let kPresent be the result of calling the
      //    HasProperty internal method of O with argument Pk.
      //   This step can be combined with c
      // c. If kPresent is true, then
      //    i.  Let elementK be the result of calling the Get
      //        internal method of O with the argument ToString(k).
      //   ii.  Let same be the result of applying the
      //        Strict Equality Comparison Algorithm to
      //        searchElement and elementK.
      //  iii.  If same is true, return k.
      if (k in O && O[k] === searchElement) {
        return k;
      }
      k++;
    }
    return -1;
  };
}
3

I use this simple approach (using "myVarToTest"):

var trueValuesRange = ['1', 1, 'true', true];

myVarToTest = (trueValuesRange.indexOf(myVarToTest) >= 0);
3

Take it easy using this lib.

https://github.com/rohmanhm/force-boolean

you just need to write a single line

const ForceBoolean = require('force-boolean')

const YOUR_VAR = 'false'
console.log(ForceBoolean(YOUR_VAR)) // it's return boolean false

It's also support for following

 return false if value is number 0
 return false if value is string '0'
 return false if value is string 'false'
 return false if value is boolean false
 return true if value is number 1
 return true if value is string '1'
 return true if value is string 'true'
 return true if value is boolean true
3

Here is simple function that will do the trick,

   function convertStringToBool(str){
        return ((str === "True") || (str === "true")) ? true:false;
    }

This will give the following result

convertStringToBool("false") //returns false
convertStringToBool("true") // returns true
convertStringToBool("False") // returns false
convertStringToBool("True") // returns true
2
  • 1
    wouldn't return str.toLowerCase() === 'true' simpler? May 8, 2019 at 15:04
  • Ah! you are 100% correct :) . Wrote that answer a few years ago. A better ES6 way of achieving the same result would be: const strToBool = (str) => str.toLowerCase() === 'true' May 9, 2019 at 17:17

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