0

I have an ajax call that is being fired multiple times.

I have used e.stopImmediatePropagation() and return false to prevent it from firing more than once. Is there another sure shot way to prevent ajax call more than once.

$(document).on('click', '#button1', function(e){
$.ajax({
    url: 'http://www.page.com',
    data: data,
    method: 'POST',
    success: function(data){

   },
   error: function(err){

   }
});
  e.stopImmediatePropagation();
  return false;
});
0

6 Answers 6

6

You can use jQuery .one()

  $(document).one('click', '#button1', function(e){
    $.ajax({
        url: 'http://www.page.com',
        data: data,
        method: 'POST',
        success: function(data){

        },
        error: function(err){

        }
    });
  });

var n = null;
$(document).one('click', '#button1', function(e){
$.ajax({
    url: 'https://gist.githubusercontent.com/anonymous/9a6997f09de9b68c59b2/raw/f7d7b756005ad6d2b88cf0211f78a2990d7d2dc7/content.json',
    data: {},
    method: 'HEAD',
    success: function(data, textStatus, jqxhr) {
      console.log(jqxhr.getAllResponseHeaders())
      $("body").append("<br>textStatus: " + textStatus + "<br>count: " + ++n)
   },
   error: function(err){

   }
});
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<button id="button1">click</button>

1
  • Simple and I don't have to track a boolean value!
    – Tommy
    Commented Jan 27, 2015 at 1:01
5

You can use jquery.data() to store a boolean to indicate whether your function has been run before.

$(document).on('click', '#button1', function(e) {
  $button = $("#button1");
  if ($button.data("pressed") !== true) {
    $.ajax({
      url: 'http://non-existentpage',
      data: {},
      method: 'POST',
      success: function(data) {
        alert('ajax');
        $button.data("pressed", true);
      },
      error: function(err) {
        alert('ajax');
        $button.data("pressed", true);
      }
    });
  }
});
#button1 {
  border: 1px solid #000;
  display: inline;
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="button1">ajax</div>

3
  • 1
    Why go to this extra effort when jQuery already provides the one() method? Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:49
  • indeed one() might be a simpler option, but there's just 1 of the many ways to do what was asked, you deserve an upvote
    – Lee Gary
    Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:55
  • What about when the button is clicked rapidly or when the ajax call is taking too much time before success or error callback are triggered?? Commented Jan 11, 2017 at 14:22
1

You could also add a condition checking if the button has already been clicked by setting a variable to true after it has been clicked:

window.document_clicked = false;
$(document).on('click', '#button1', function(e){
    if(!window.document_clicked){
        $.ajax({
            url: 'http://www.page.com',
            data: data,
            method: 'POST',
            success: function(data){
                window.document_clicked = true;
            },
            error: function(err){

            }
        });
    }
});
1
  • jQuery actually includes a once() method (api.jquery.com/one) that achieves the same thing without needing a global variable, as in your example. Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:43
0

Adding async: false to your current function

or USE .click

$('#button1').click(function(e){

});
-1

Setting async to false means that the statement you are calling has to complete before the next statement in your function can be called.

$(document).on('click', '#button1', function(e){
$.ajax({
    url: 'http://www.page.com',
    data: data,
    async: false, 
    method: 'POST',
    success: function(data){

   },
   error: function(err){

   }
});
  e.stopImmediatePropagation();
  return false;
});
1
  • 1
    async will just make it run sequentially?
    – Lee Gary
    Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:47
-1

Try this instead

$('#button1').click(function(e){
   $.ajax({
   url: 'http://www.page.com',
   data: data,
   method: 'POST',
   success: function(data){
   },
   error: function(err){

   }
});

Much simpler and it should fix that issue of multiple ajax calls.

You also shouldn't have to return false.

4
  • Care to explain down votes?. This solution should work.
    – bigfetz
    Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:43
  • click is just an alias to on... your example won't change anything and the AJAX request will still be made on each button click. Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:45
  • Of course it will be fired on each the button is clicked. His problem is he is clicking once and getting the ajax called multiple times.
    – bigfetz
    Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:48
  • Hm, I don't think that is clear from the original question. Either way, your example is no different than the code in the original question except for your use of click which, as I described, is simply an alias to on (which is what OP is already using) Commented Oct 16, 2014 at 5:51

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