3

I'd like to view previous version of code. And choose to use the git checkout [commit] command to roll the workspace back to the target version.

I tried both git checkout [commit] and git checkout [commit] .. With or without the tailing dot, the workspace can both be rolled back.

So what's the difference between them?

1 Answer 1

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The difference is very simple, and integral to how git thinks..

git branch
* master
git checkout [commit]
git branch
* (no branch)
git status
<no changes>

Here, you asked git to switch to an un-named branch based on the [commit]. It did so, and you have a clean working directory ready for you to name your branch. git checkout master will take you home again.

git branch
* master
git checkout [commit] -- .
git branch
* master
git status
<lots of changes>

Here you asked git to extract the contents of [commit] and splatter them all over your working directory, all ready for you to do whatever you want with the files. 'git reset --hard HEAD; git clean -f -d -x' will take you home again.

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  • Is there any difference between git checkout [commit] . and git checkout [commit] -- .?
    – Weibo Li
    Commented Oct 19, 2014 at 4:27
  • 1
    The git checkout man page shows that -- separates [commits] from [paths]. The -- is optional, and is really important if you have a file who's name can be confused with a hash, a branch name, a tag or anything git considers special
    – Dave
    Commented Oct 19, 2014 at 5:28

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