5

I need help with converting a nested for loop into multthreading program in Perl, e.g.

for ( my $i=0; $i<100; $i++) {
    for ( my $j=0; $j<100; $j++ ) {
         for ( my $k=0; $k<100; $k++ ) { 
             #do something ....                 
         } 
     }
 }

Is there a way where i can split the first loop as below and run them in parallel

#Job1: 
for ( my $i=0; $i < 40; $i++) {
    for( my $j=0; $j < 100; $j++) {
        for( my $k=0; $k < 100; $k++) {
            #do something ....
         }
     }
 }

#Job2: 
for ( my $i=40; $i < 80; $i++) {
    for( my $j=0; $j<100; $j++) {
        for( my $k=0; $k<100; $k++) {
            #do something ....
         }
     }
 }

#Job3
for ( my $i=80; $i < 100; $i++) {
    for( my $j=0; $j < 100; $j++) {
        for( my $k=0; $k < 100; $k++) {
            #do something ....
         }
     }
 }

How can I run each program in parallel and then exit the main program only when all the sub program Job1,Job2 and job3 are complete.

4
  • Are loops execution blocks depending on each other ? or the order doesn't matter ? i.e. if you executed i=5 's block before i=3 's block will it matter with you or it's the same ? This question affect the solution directly – Ashraf Bashir Oct 16 '14 at 12:50
  • Thread::Queue – choroba Oct 16 '14 at 13:03
  • I'd go with Parallel::ForkManager instead, as this looks implicitly parallel. – Sobrique Oct 16 '14 at 15:05
  • I can run the loops in any order only they should run sucessfully, then only the main program should exit – user3754136 Oct 19 '14 at 12:44
7

I'll offer a reference to a similar answer I've used before - they key question is - are your jobs completely decoupled? E.g. no data needs to move between them?

If so, use Parallel::ForkManager it goes a bit like this:

use Parallel::ForkManager;
my $fork_manager = Parallel::ForkManager -> new ( 10 ); #10 in parallel

for ( my $i=0;$i<100;$i++) {
    #in parallel:
    $fork_manager -> start and next;
    for ( my $j=0; $j < 100; $j++) {
         for ( my $k=0; $k < 100; $k++) { 
             #do something ....
         }
    }
    $fork_manager -> finish;
}
$fork_manager -> wait_all_children();

This will, for each iteration of $i fork the code and run in parallel - and ForkManager will cap the concurrency at 10.

This number should be approximately comparable to the limiting factor in your parallelism - if it's CPU, then number of CPUs, but bear in mind that you're often more constrained by disk IO.

Key caveats when doing parallelism:

  • You can't guarantee execution sequence without messing around. It's entirely possible that loop $i==1 finishes after loop $i==2. Or before. Or whatever.

  • If you're passing information between your loops, parallel loses efficiency - because the sender and receiver each need to synchronise. It's even worse if you need to synchronise the whole lot, so try to avoid doing that more than necessary. (e.g. wherever possible, leave it until the end and collate the results).

  • That goes double for forked code - they're separate processes, so you actually have to try to transfer things back and forth.

  • You can get some really very fruity bugs from parallel code, because of that first point. Individual lines of code may occur in any order, so very strange things can happen. Each process will sequence, but multiple may well interleave. Something innocuous like open ( my $file, ">>", $output_filename ); can trip you up.

  • forking is quite limited in it's ability to share data between forks. If you need to do much of this, consider threading instead.

Threading is an alternative model of concurrency, that can be valuable in certain circumstance. I'm generally leaning towards forking being generally 'better', but in places where I'm wanting to do a fair bit of inter-process communication, I'd be tending to look more towards threads. Perl daemonize with child daemons

2
  • Will the above run 10 instances with i value from 1 to 100, what if i want to split the loop such that each instance of job runs with value 1 to 10, 10 to 20, 20 to 30, 30 to 40 ... till 100. – user3754136 Oct 19 '14 at 12:50
  • It'll start one instance per iteration. So initially - 10 jobs, 1..10. As one of these completes, it'll start 11. Such that you work through them in order, but always have 10 going at once. If you really wanted to divide them so each fork did 1..10, 11..20 etc. you could, but you'd need to change the loop. I'd question why you need to bother, as creating forked processes is efficient. – Sobrique Oct 19 '14 at 16:29

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