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Running the commands docker images and docker images -a results in the following outputs:

$ docker images
REPOSITORY           TAG        IMAGE ID            CREATED         VIRTUAL SIZE
ubuntu               14.04      9cbaf023786c        2 days ago      192.8 MB
$ docker images -a
REPOSITORY           TAG        IMAGE ID            CREATED         VIRTUAL SIZE
ubuntu               14.04      9cbaf023786c        2 days ago      192.8 MB
<none>               <none>     03db2b23cf03        2 days ago      192.8 MB
<none>               <none>     8f321fc43180        2 days ago      192.8 MB
<none>               <none>     6a459d727ebb        2 days ago      192.8 MB
<none>               <none>     2dcbbf65536c        2 days ago      192.8 MB
<none>               <none>     97fd97495e49        2 days ago      192.6 MB

Are the images tagged <none> of any importance? If not: why do they come with the tagged images I pulled? Do the sizes add up or are they just a repition? If so, can I delete them without any effect on my work?

2 Answers 2

11

The image files are independent, and combine via unionfs magic to form a running container. The images you care about are often tagged with memorable names. You can delete the unused images, i.e. those not contributing to any image you care about. I do it this way in bash:

function docker_rm_unnamed_images {
  sudo docker rmi $(sudo docker images | grep '^<none>' | awk '{print $3}')
}

You can think of a docker image as a stack of 'layers'. Each Dockerfile command adds an additional layer to the image. It's important to realize that each of those commands creates a separate image file. So the Dockerfile

FROM foo
RUN a
RUN b
RUN c

would be a stack of

image=1 (possibly pulled from the foo registry)
image=2 (after applying a to image 1)
image=3 (after applying b to image 2)
image=4 (after applying c to image 3)

It is likely that the foo image was composed of multiple other layers, so your final image is a stack of 4 or more images. Each of those image files lives in your docker image registry. Most of them are unnamed, because they correspond to a RUN command, for example. Each of the image files 1-4 are probably fairly small (unless they correspond to a yum install p1 .. p100 for example). Together they make up the file system of the container that you ultimately run.

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    Thanks for that. I found this way to delete them yesterday here: stackoverflow.com/questions/21398087/… My questions are actually more directed towards an understanding: Are the images tagged '<none>' of any importance? Why do they come with the tagged images I pulled? Do the sizes add up or are they just a repition?
    – Steven
    Oct 16, 2014 at 14:22
1

To remove all untagged images, the additional options is needed:

docker rmi $(sudo docker images -a | grep '^<none>' | awk '{print $3}')

option '-a': show all images, including untagged images

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    Untagged images are called 'dangling'. To remove them in the proper docker way, please use command docker images -qf dangling=true | xargs docker rmi
    – sobi3ch
    Oct 4, 2018 at 11:44

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