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I often see questions relating to Overflow errors with .

My question is why use the integer variable declaration instead of just defining all numerical variables (excluding double etc.) as long?

Unless you're performing an operation like in a for loop where you can guarantee that the value won't exceed the 32,767 limit, is there an impact on performance or something else that would dictate not using long?

0

9 Answers 9

159

Integer variables are stored as 16-bit (2-byte) numbers

Office VBA Reference

Long (long integer) variables are stored as signed 32-bit (4-byte) numbers

Office VBA Reference

So, the benefit is in reduced memory space. An Integer takes up half the memory that a Long does. Now, we are talking about 2 bytes, so it's not going to make a real difference for individual integers, it's only a concern when you are dealing with TONS of integers (e.g large arrays) and memory usage is critical.

BUT on a 32 bit system, the halved memory usage comes at a performance cost. When the processor actually performs some computation with a 16 bit integer (e.g. incrementing a loop counter), the value silently gets converted to a temporary Long without the benefit of the larger range of numbers to work with. Overflows still happen, and the register that the processor uses to store the values for the calculation will take the same amount of memory (32 bits) either way. Performance may even be hurt because the datatype has to be converted (at a very low level).

Not the reference I was looking for but....

My understanding is that the underlying VB engine converts integers to long even if its declared as an integer. Therefore a slight speed decrease can be noted. I have believed this for some time and perhaps thats also why the above statement was made, I didnt ask for reasoning.

ozgrid forums

This is the reference I was looking for.

Short answer, in 32-bit systems 2 byte integers are converted to 4 byte Longs. There really is no other way so that respective bits correctly line up for any form of processing. Consider the following

MsgBox Hex(-1) = Hex(65535) ' = True

Obviously -1 does not equal 65535 yet the computer is returning the correct answer, namely "FFFF" = "FFFF"

However had we coerced the -1 to a long first we would have got the right answer (the 65535 being greater than 32k is automatically a long)

MsgBox Hex(-1&) = Hex(65535) ' = False

"FFFFFFFF" = "FFFF"

Generally there is no point in VBA to declare "As Integer" in modern systems, except perhaps for some legacy API's that expect to receive an Integer.

pcreview forum

And at long last I found the msdn documentation I was really truly looking for.

Traditionally, VBA programmers have used integers to hold small numbers, because they required less memory. In recent versions, however, VBA converts all integer values to type Long, even if they're declared as type Integer. So there's no longer a performance advantage to using Integer variables; in fact, Long variables may be slightly faster because VBA does not have to convert them.

To clarify based on the comments: Integers still require less memory to store - a large array of integers will need significantly less RAM than a Long array with the same dimensions (almost exactly half as much, which you can check for yourself in Task Manager). But because the processor needs to work with 32 bit chunks of memory, VBA converts Integers to Longs temporarily when it performs calculations


So, in summary, there's almost no good reason to use an Integer type these days. Unless you need to Interop with an old API call that expects a 16 bit int, or you are working with large arrays of small integers and memory is at a premium.

One thing worth pointing out is that some old API functions may be expecting parameters that are 16-bit (2-byte) Integers and if you are on a 32 bit and trying to pass an Integer (that is already a 4-byte long) by reference it will not work due to difference in length of bytes.

Thanks to Vba4All for pointing that out.

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    One thing worth pointing out is that some old API functions may be expecting parameters that are 16-bit (2-byte) Integers and if you are on a 32 bit and trying to pass an Integer (that is already a 4-byte long) by reference it will not work due to difference in length of bytes.
    – user2140173
    Nov 4, 2014 at 9:04
  • 3
    @It'sbeenapleasure I'don't understand. If you pass a Long by ref to a function that expects an Integer by ref, it will use the first two bytes, and since numbers are stored in little-endian, it will work (provided that only the two lower bytes are meaningful, but it's likely if this Long is simply an Integer stored in 32 bits).
    – user1220978
    Apr 26, 2015 at 7:16
  • 3
    The other time that you must use Integer is when declaring a Type, where the type's layout and size is important, either because you're passing the type to an API, or you're serializing/deserializing a file, or you're copying bytes with LSet/Rset. Apr 9, 2017 at 20:01
  • 1
    That MSDN article is wrong and/or misleading. It might refer to e.g. Integers being internally processed as Longs inside a processor, but for all observable purposes an Integer still takes two bytes. See answers and comments under stackoverflow.com/q/26717148/11683 for extended discussion.
    – GSerg
    Sep 3, 2017 at 13:06
  • 1
    You don't seem to state anywhere in your answer that msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/… might be wrong or misleading, rather, you are presenting it as the msdn documentation I was really truly looking for. However my comment was mostly directed towards future readers rather than yourself, because you have participated in that other question, even though your answer there in my opinion should not have been accepted (this one I believe should have been).
    – GSerg
    Sep 3, 2017 at 13:18
15

Even though this post is four years old, I was curious about this and ran some tests. The most important thing to note is that a coder should ALWAYS declare a variable as SOMETHING. Undeclared variables clearly performed the worst (undeclared are technically Variant)

Long did perform the fastest, so I have to think that Microsoft's recommendation to always use Long instead of Integer makes sense. I'm guessing the same as true with Byte, but most coders don't use this.

RESULTS ON 64 BIT WINDOWS 10 LAPTOP

Variable Olympics

Code Used:

Sub VariableOlymics()
'Run this macro as many times as you'd like, with an activesheet ready for data
'in cells B2 to D6
Dim beginTIME As Double, trials As Long, i As Long, p As Long

    trials = 1000000000
    p = 0

    beginTIME = Now
    For i = 1 To trials
        Call boomBYTE
    Next i
    Call Finished(p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials))
    p = p + 1

    beginTIME = Now
    For i = 1 To trials
        Call boomINTEGER
    Next i
    Call Finished(p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials))
    p = p + 1


    beginTIME = Now
    For i = 1 To trials
        Call boomLONG
    Next i
    Call Finished(p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials))
    p = p + 1


    beginTIME = Now
    For i = 1 To trials
        Call boomDOUBLE
    Next i
    Call Finished(p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials))
    p = p + 1


    beginTIME = Now
    For i = 1 To trials
        Call boomUNDECLARED
    Next i
    Call Finished(p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials))
    p = p + 1

End Sub


Private Sub boomBYTE()
Dim a As Byte, b As Byte, c As Byte

    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1

End Sub


Private Sub boomINTEGER()
Dim a As Integer, b As Integer, c As Integer

    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1

End Sub


Private Sub boomLONG()
Dim a As Long, b As Long, c As Long

    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1

End Sub


Private Sub boomDOUBLE()
Dim a As Double, b As Double, c As Double

    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1

End Sub


Private Sub boomUNDECLARED()

    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1

End Sub

Private Sub Finished(i As Long, timeUSED As Double, trials As Double)

    With Range("B2").Offset(i, 0)
            .Value = .Value + trials
            .Offset(0, 1).Value = .Offset(0, 1).Value + timeUSED
            .Offset(0, 2).FormulaR1C1 = "=ROUND(RC[-1]*3600*24,0)"
    End With

End Sub
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    The undeclared variable is a variant. Dim a as Variant, b as Variant, c As Variant should give the same result as not "dimming" at all.
    – Vityata
    Sep 4, 2018 at 21:41
  • @Vityata, I was aware that "undeclared" SHOULD mean variant, but keep in mind the backstory to this whole discussion was microsoft automatically converting integer to Long despite being defined! So I wasn't sure what to expect with whole numbers without being defined. Seeing the result, it seems most likely to truly be Variants, but that's why I gave the name "Undeclared" vs. 'Variant." Plus that's probably a lot more useful to lower level coders. However, I'll go ahead and add that in now. Thanks for feedback. Sep 7, 2018 at 7:00
  • @PGCodeRider - it would be probably interesting to create a dll library with c++ and to add it to VBA and to benchmark it there as well. The results would be probably interesting. I have done something similar here - vitoshacademy.com/…
    – Vityata
    Sep 7, 2018 at 8:38
13

As noted in other answers, the real difference between int and long is the size of its memory space and therefore the size of the number it can hold.

here is the full documentation on these datatypes http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/ms474284(v=office.14).aspx

an Integer is 16 bits and can represent a value between -32,768 and 32,767

a Long is 32 bits and can represent -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647

and there is a LongLong which is 64 bits and can handle like 9 pentilion

One of the most important things to remember on this is that datatypes differ by both language and operating system / platform. In your world of VBA a long is 32 bits, but in c# on a 64 bit processor a long is 64 bits. This can introduce significant confusion.

Although VBA does not have support for it, when you move to any other language in .net or java or other, I much prefer to use the system datatypes of int16, int32 and int64 which allows me to b much more transparent about the values that can be held in these datatypes.

8

VBA has a lot of historical baggage.

An Integer is 16 bits wide and was a good default numeric type back when 16 bit architecture/word sizes were prevalent.

A Long is 32 bits wide and (IMO) should be used wherever possible.

6

I have taken @PGSystemTester's method and updated it to remove some potential variability. By placing the loop in the routines, this removes the time taken to call the routine (which is a lot of time). I have also turned off screen updating to remove any delays this may cause.

Long still performed the best, and as these results are more closely limited to the impacts of the variable types alone, the magnitude of variation is worth noting.

My results (desktop, Windows 7, Excel 2010):

enter image description here

Code used:

Option Explicit

Sub VariableOlympics()
'Run this macro as many times as you'd like, with an activesheet ready for data
'in cells B2 to D6
Dim beginTIME As Double, trials As Long, i As Long, p As Long
Dim chosenWorksheet As Worksheet

    Set chosenWorksheet = ThisWorkbook.Sheets("TimeTrialInfo")

    Application.EnableEvents = False
    Application.Calculation = xlCalculationManual
    Application.ScreenUpdating = False

    trials = 1000000000 ' 1,000,000,000 - not 10,000,000,000 as used by @PGSystemTester

    p = 0

    beginTIME = Now
    boomBYTE trials
    Finished p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials), chosenWorksheet.Range("B2")
    p = p + 1

    beginTIME = Now
    boomINTEGER trials
    Finished p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials), chosenWorksheet.Range("B2")
    p = p + 1


    beginTIME = Now
    boomLONG trials
    Finished p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials), chosenWorksheet.Range("B2")
    p = p + 1


    beginTIME = Now
    boomDOUBLE trials
    Finished p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials), chosenWorksheet.Range("B2")
    p = p + 1


    beginTIME = Now
    boomUNDECLARED trials
    Finished p, Now - beginTIME, CDbl(trials), chosenWorksheet.Range("B2")
    p = p + 1

    Application.EnableEvents = True
    Application.Calculation = xlCalculationAutomatic
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
    chosenWorksheet.Calculate

End Sub


Private Sub boomBYTE(numTrials As Long)
Dim a As Byte, b As Byte, c As Byte

Dim i As Long
For i = 1 To numTrials
    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1
Next i

End Sub


Private Sub boomINTEGER(numTrials As Long)
Dim a As Integer, b As Integer, c As Integer

Dim i As Long
For i = 1 To numTrials
    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1
Next i

End Sub


Private Sub boomLONG(numTrials As Long)
Dim a As Long, b As Long, c As Long

Dim i As Long
For i = 1 To numTrials
    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1
Next i

End Sub


Private Sub boomDOUBLE(numTrials As Long)
Dim a As Double, b As Double, c As Double

Dim i As Long
For i = 1 To numTrials
    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1
Next i

End Sub


Private Sub boomUNDECLARED(numTrials As Long)
Dim a As Variant, b As Variant, c As Variant

Dim i As Long
For i = 1 To numTrials
    a = 1
    b = 1 + a
    c = 1 + b
    c = c + 1
Next i

End Sub

Private Sub Finished(i As Long, timeUSED As Double, trials As Double, initialCell As Range)

    With initialCell.Offset(i, 0)
            .Value = trials
            .Offset(0, 1).Value = timeUSED
            .Offset(0, 2).FormulaR1C1 = "=ROUND(RC[-1]*3600*24,2)"
    End With

End Sub
4
  • I actually like this approach better than mine. Jun 6, 2021 at 21:19
  • Interested, do you have any performance test results for a cloud instance of Postgresql? And what is Postgresql version do you use? Could your explain mechanic of the best results for Long versus Integer? Apr 3, 2023 at 10:56
  • @OlegUshakov: See the accepted answer for the mechanics. And you could easily do the test yourself in your favourite environment.
    – AJD
    Apr 4, 2023 at 20:01
  • @AJD Or, I'm so sorry, I thought you do tests for a postgresql environment. I didn't catch the details about excel and vba script. I beg your pardon for my missed Apr 5, 2023 at 15:55
5

This is a space vs necessity problem.

In some situations it's a necessity to use a long. If you're looping through rows in a large excel file, the variable that holds the row number should be a long.

However, sometimes you will know that an integer can handle your problem and using a long would be a waste of space (memory). Individual variables really don't make much of a difference, but when you start dealing with arrays it can make a big difference.

  • In VBA7, Integers are 2 bytes and longs are 4 bytes

  • If you have an array of 1 million numbers between 1 and 10, using an Integer array would take up about 2MB of RAM, compared to roughly 4MB of RAM for a long array.

5
  • 1
    For an array of numbers between 1 and 10, you could use a BYTE array instead, but I understand the point you are making.
    – ChrisB
    Aug 31, 2017 at 16:51
  • This was probably true some 15 years ago, but now the answer is really outdated.
    – Vityata
    Sep 5, 2018 at 10:24
  • How is this outdated? Problems in pandas where you have millions of rows (big data/machine learning), or in networking when transferring large amounts of data (ex. physics experiments)
    – Alter
    Sep 5, 2018 at 14:05
  • @Alter - I guess you missed the point of the original question. Take a look at the accepted answer.
    – Vityata
    Sep 7, 2018 at 8:42
  • 1
    Looks like I understood it. Also the accepted answer points out it's talking about 32 bit systems when it says there's no difference.
    – Alter
    Sep 7, 2018 at 12:13
2

As others already mentioned, a Long may take twice as much space as an Integer. As others also already mentioned, the high capacity of current computers means you will see no difference in performance whatsoever, unless you are dealing with extra extra extra large amounts of data:

Memory

Considering 1 million values, the difference between using Integers versus Longs would be of 2 bytes for each value, so that is 2 * 1 000 000 / 1,024 / 1024 = less than 2 MB of difference in your RAM, which is likely much less than 1% or even 0.1% of your RAM capacity.

Processing

Considering the benchmark done by PGSystemTester's, you can see a difference of 811 - 745 = 66 seconds between Longs and Integers, when processing 10 billion batches of 4 operations each. Reduce the number to 1 million of operations and we can expect 66 / 10 000 / 4 = less than 2ms of difference in execution time.


I personally use Integers and Longs to help readability of my code, particularly in loops, where an Integer indicates the loop is expected to be small (less than 1000 iterations), whereas a Long tells me the loop is expected to be rather large (more than 1000).

Note this subjective threshold is way below the Integer upper limit, I use Longs just to make the distinction between my own definitions of small and large.

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I know it is an old post, but I found it while browsing and I also wanted to share my findings: after @PGSystemTester's method I got those enter image description here

and after AJD's

enter image description here

Intel i5-8500T CPU 8gigs of RAM 64bit system and Win10Enterprise 21H1 OS build 19043.2006 while excel is on Version 2108 and Build 14326.20852

I also don't know if it was influencing but I also got Rubberduck Vers. 2.5.2.5906

but it seems like my Integer is faster in both cases

0

Ty AJD and pgSystemTester. I confirm AJD results for Integer 33 and Long 20. Yet Long is much much faster only because your test program is small enough to fit entirely in the processor cache memory. The fastest ram is L1 cache and that is only 32kB for data and 32kB for program. Testing Byte, Integer and Long for one or several arrays that barely fit into 32kB of L1 data cache will give you totally different or opposite results regarding the speeds.

In my case for the same arrays that totals 120kB for Integers and 240kB for Long i had the same result for Long as for Integer. That is because changing to Long the same arrays totals double the size compared with Integer arrays, and so, more and more of data had fall outside L1 cache due to the change to Long. To reach data outside L1 cache took much more clocks or time.

Therefore your test is good only as a test yet in real life is misleading as msdn.microsoft recommendation to use Long regardless. Also those who emphasize that ram size is double for Long had not emphasize the consequence for the processor waiting time to reach data outside of L1 cache or even worst outside L2 cache or outside L3 cache. For each outside L1, L2 and L3 the time to reach the data will increase dramatically and this is most important for speed.

To summarize:

  1. if your data fit inside the L1 cache then Long is fastest but that is only 4k of data times 4Bytes for Long = 16kB (because other programs and OS will populate the rest of 32k of L1 cache),

  2. Byte and Integer will drastically increase the speed for arrays in size of at least 16kB, because changing to Long will increase size and this will force more data to reside outside the fastest L1 cache ram.

Try the same test but instead of Dim a As Byte use Dim a() As Byte , example:

Dim a() As Byte, b() As Byte, c() As Byte
ReDim a(7, 24, 60), b(24, 7, 60), c(24, 60, 7)
Dim h As Long, loops As Long: Dim i As Long, j As Long, k As Long   '   these i, j, k always As Long
loops=1
For h = 1 To loops
    For i = 1 To 6: For j = 0 To 23: For k = 1 To 58
a(i, j, k) = a(i + 1, j, k): b(j, i, k) = b(j, i - 1, k)
c(j, k, i) = a(i - 1, j, k + 1) + b(j, i - 1, k - 1)
    Next k: Next j: Next i
    For i = 6 To 1 Step -1: For j = 23 To 0 Step -1: For k = 58 To 1 Step -1
a(i, j, k) = a(i + 1, j, k): b(j, i, k) = b(j, i - 1, k)
c(j, k, i) = a(i - 1, j, k + 1) + b(j, i - 1, k - 1)
    Next k: Next j: Next i
Next h

First set "loops" to 1 to see how long it takes. Then increase it gradually aiming for several seconds for As Bytes. It will take longer for As Integer, and even longer for As Long...

The size of each of the 3 array is 8x25x61 = 12200 and this is

12200 kB times 3 = 36600 kB for As Byte ,

24400 kB times 3 = 73200 kB for As Integer ,

48800 kB times 3 = 146400 kB for As Long .

Run the same code with Dim a() As Integer, b() As Integer, c() As Integer, then the same with Dim a() As Long, b() As Long, c() As Long and so on.

Now if you increase one dimension 20 times you will expect a 20 increase in duration but it will be much more because now data will fall outside the L2 cache (1MB shared for all 4 cores).

If you increase one dimension 200 times you will expect a 200 increase in duration but it will be again much more because now data will fall outside the L3 cache (6-8MB shared for all 4 cores and the same 8MB for 8 cores or 16MB if ryzen 5800...).

I can't understand why after 20 years or more the L1 cache is only 64kB when it can be at least 16x16=256kB . With 16bits for row address and 16bits for column address you have to read only 32bits and that is one read for 32 bits processor. I suspect that is because perhaps the core still works on 16bits (8 for row + 8 for column address, 8x8=64kB) or worst on only 8bits.

After testing please post your results.

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