98

I'm having trouble getting command line arguments passed to Python programs if I try to execute them directly as executable commands from a Windows command shell. For example, if I have this program (test.py):

import sys
print "Args: %r" % sys.argv[1:]

And execute:

>test foo
Args: []

as compared to:

>python test.py foo
Args: ['foo']

My configuration has:

PATH=...;C:\python25;...
PATHEXT=...;.PY;....

>assoc .py
.py=Python.File

>ftype | grep Python
Python.CompiledFile="C:\Python25\python.exe" "%1" %*
Python.File="C:\Python25\python.exe" "%1" %*
Python.NoConFile="C:\Python25\pythonw.exe" "%1" %*
6
  • However it works for me. C:\Documents and Settings\Quim>test foo Args: ['foo'] I situated test.py in the initial location for cmd.exe (%HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH% in properties). For the rest there is nothing special in my setup: winxp, Activepython 2.6.5
    – joaquin
    Apr 14, 2010 at 21:25
  • 2
    Wow what a frustrating bug :( I just reinstalled Python and it's still broken! The bug was reported at the Python issue tracker two years ago bugs.python.org/issue7936 but there's no fix - few of the devs use Windows. Sep 18, 2012 at 19:38
  • 2
    Ran into this when I installed python 3.4 and tried to use python 2.7. Looks like the python 3.4 installer messed it up?
    – Dogmatixed
    Oct 21, 2014 at 14:02
  • 3
    If the system is using [HKCU|HKLM]\SOFTWARE\Classes\Applications\python.exe or [HKCU|HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes\py_auto_file, then it's misconfigured, and the offending keys should be deleted. Then use Explorer ("open with" or the file association settings app) to select the correct "Python" entry that uses the standard [HKCU|HKLM]\SOFTWARE\Classes\Python.File ProgId. Check the shell\open\command subkey in regedit. If Python 3 is installed, the command template should use the py launcher. If the launcher is installed for all users, the template should be "C:\Windows\py.exe" "%1" %*.
    – Eryk Sun
    Jun 9, 2016 at 6:54
  • 1
    cmd's internal assoc and ftype commands only show and modify HKLM\SOFTWARE\Classes, so they require administrator access to write to the registry, and they're not the correct tools to use if Python is installed for the current user. You have to use regedit to modify per-user settings in HKCU\SOFTWARE\Classes, which takes precedence over HKLM settings. Plus the association to the ProgId should always be managed via Explorer instead of using assoc. Explorer stores the user's choice in HKCU\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts.
    – Eryk Sun
    Jun 9, 2016 at 7:02

12 Answers 12

125

I think I solved this. For some reason there is a SECOND place in the registry (besides that shown by the file associations stored in HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\shell\open\command):

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\python.exe\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python25\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"

This seems to be the controlling setting on my system. The registry setting above adds the "%*" to pass all arguments to python.exe (it was missing in my registry for some reason).

11
  • 8
    My key is located here on Windows 7: HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-2829634124-923609355-2255922086-1001\Software\Classes\Applications\python.exe\shell\open\command Oct 8, 2010 at 21:49
  • 4
    With the value: C:\Python26\python.exe %1 %* Oct 8, 2010 at 21:57
  • 2
    Worked for me, remember that mckoss's answer is escaped or a .REG file if you are editing the values directly removed the escapes in there
    – fedmich
    Mar 2, 2014 at 11:03
  • 3
    On a side note: The root cause of this might be due to an initial file association with .py files prior to the Python install. Just ran into this issue, files of type .py had been associated with Notepad and then Python was installed and this ugly problem reared its ugly head. On Windows 10 BTW.
    – g4m3c0d3r
    May 24, 2016 at 22:32
  • 3
    Recently changed the launcher to use C:\Windows\py.exe, and came across this bug. However, I modified the key in @StevenKeith's version, with "py.exe" substituted for "python.exe" Jun 21, 2018 at 23:01
14

For Python 3.3 on Windows 7, my setting was under another registry key; the key I changed to make the arguments get passed was

HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-3922133726-554333396-2662258059-1000_Classes\py_auto_file\shell\open\command

It was "C:\Python\Python33\python.exe" "%1". I only appended %* to it. The key's value is now "C:\Python\Python33\python.exe" "%1" %*.

I had several (at least five) other keys with the value "C:\Python\Python33\python.exe" "%1", but this is the one I changed that made it work.

0
14

My setting was under yet another registry key, HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file. The other keys mentioned also existed, but Windows was using this one for some reason.

0
5

To make it working for me, I had to use the registry path:

HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\shell\open\command

and added a %*

5

Here are .reg files to fix for Python 3.6, 2.7 and Anaconda3:

python-3.6.0.reg

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.py]
@="Python.File"
"Content Type"="text/plain"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pyc]
@="Python.CompiledFile"
"Content Type"="text/plain"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pyw]
@="Python.NoConFile"
"Content Type"="text/plain"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file]

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python36\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python36\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File]
@="Python File"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python36\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python36\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile]
@="Compiled Python File"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python36\\DLLs\\pyc.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python36\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile]
@="Python File (no console)"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python36\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python36\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"

python-2.7.0.reg

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.py]
@="Python.File"
"Content Type"="text/plain"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pyc]
@="Python.CompiledFile"
"Content Type"="text/plain"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pyw]
@="Python.NoConFile"
"Content Type"="text/plain"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file]

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python27\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python27\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File]
@="Python File"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python27\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python27\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile]
@="Compiled Python File"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python27\\DLLs\\pyc.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python27\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile]
@="Python File (no console)"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Python27\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Python27\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"

ananconda3.reg (change username)

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.py]
@="Python.File"
"Content Type"="text/plain"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pyc]
@="Python.CompiledFile"
"Content Type"="text/plain"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.pyw]
@="Python.NoConFile"
"Content Type"="text/plain"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file]

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File]
@="Python File"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile]
@="Compiled Python File"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\DLLs\\pyc.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.CompiledFile\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"


[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile]
@="Python File (no console)"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile\DefaultIcon]
@="C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\DLLs\\py.ico"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.NoConFile\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Users\\username\\Anaconda3\\python.exe\" \"%1\" %*"
1

If fixed this on my Windows 10 system by editing the following registry keys:

Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\shell\open\command
Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\Shell\Open\Command
Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\python.exe\shell\open\command

to this value:

"C:\Python27\python.exe" "%1" %*
1
  • is this a bug in the python windows installer?
    – ta32
    Dec 16, 2021 at 5:23
1

A lot of thanks for the most of other answers for helping me to find the solution!

My case was to open .py-files with py.exe (not python.exe directly), this case it noted in a couple of comments, but I decided to post this as a separate answer to emphasize the difference.

So I have my .py-files associated with C:\Windows\py.exe and in C:\Windows\py.ini config I have a couple of shebang definitions

[commands]
<my_venv_py> = C:\Programs\my_venv_py\Scripts\python.exe
<my_venv_py_w> = C:\Programs\my_venv_py\Scripts\pythonw.exe

to use in my scripts like this #!<MY_VENV_PY>.

And on Microsoft Windows 7 [Version 6.1.7601] my python script did NOT received the args like this

script.py 1 2

but this worked fine

py script.py 1 2

File associations were OK

> assoc .py
.py=Python.File

> ftype | grep Python
File STDIN:
Python.CompiledFile="C:\Windows\py.exe" "%1" %*
Python.File=C:\Windows\py.exe "%L" %*
Python.NoConFile="C:\Windows\pyw.exe" "%1" %*

I've tried much of registry changes, but the last helped was the following change (saved to a .reg-file and run). I've found this registry key searching "%1" string with initial value "C:\Windows\py.exe" "%1" and added %* in the end as other answers note:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\py.exe\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Windows\\py.exe\" \"%1\" %*"

For information, before I tried to setup these keys and values and did not helped (at least before the noted above):

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.py]
@="Python.File"
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\.py]
@="Python.File"
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\.py]
@="Python.File"
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\FileExts\.py]
@="Python.File"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file]
@="Python File"
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Windows\\py.exe\" \"%1\" %*"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File]
@="Python File"
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Python.File\Shell\Open\command]
@="\"C:\\Windows\\py.exe\" \"%1\" %*"

1

Had to modify this in Windows 10 to get it to work (%* at the end)

Computer\HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-2364940108-955964078-1358188674-1001\Software\Classes\Applications\py.exe\shell\open\command

0

Interesting. Works here using python 2.6 and Windows XP (5.1.2600):

C:\Documents and Settings\hbrown>python test.py foo
['test.py', 'foo']

C:\Documents and Settings\hbrown>test.py foo
['C:\\Documents and Settings\\hbrown\\test.py', 'foo']

C:\Documents and Settings\hbrown>test foo
['C:\\Documents and Settings\\hbrown\\test.py', 'foo']

C:\Documents and Settings\hbrown>type test.py
import sys
print sys.argv 

C:\Documents and Settings\hbrown>echo %PATHEXT%
.COM;.EXE;.BAT;.CMD;.VBS;.VBE;.JS;.JSE;.WSF;.WSH;.PY 

C:\Documents and Settings\hbrown>assoc .py
.py=Python.File
0

Your program associations for .py files might be messed up. Just re-associate .py files with your python executable.

Right click a .py file > Open with > Choose default program ... > [find C:\PythonXY\python.exe]

2
  • Did not work on my system, as it always defaulted to calling Python 3.6. The selected answer did work
    – Aaron3468
    May 23, 2017 at 5:07
  • There are problems since Windows10, so this does not work always.
    – rundekugel
    Jan 14, 2018 at 23:11
0

I checked all registry keys with python.exe and py_auto_file and made them point to my current python installation including th %* at the end that passes arguments. They were quite a few:

  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\python.exe\shell\open\command:

    • org: "C:\miniconda3\python.exe" "%1" "%*"
    • changed: "C:\Python35\python.exe" "%1" "%*"
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\py_auto_file\shell\open\command

    • org: "C:\Program Files\Sublime Text 3\sublime_text.exe" "%1"
    • changed: "C:\Python35\python.exe" "%1" "%*"
  • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\py_auto_file\shell\open\command

    • org: "C:\Python35\python.exe" "%1" "%*"
  • HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-2621213409-1291422344-4183577876-2165\Software\Classes\py_auto_file\shell\open\command

    • org: "C:\Python35\python.exe" "%1" "%*"
  • HKEY_USERS\S-1-5-21-2621213409-1291422344-4183577876-2165_Classes\py_auto_file\shell\open\command

    • org: "C:\Python35\python.exe" "%1" "%*"
  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Applications\pythonw.exe\shell\open\command

    • org: "C:\Python34\pythonw.exe" "%1"
    • changed: "C:\Python35\pythonw.exe" "%1" "%*"
  • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\Applications\python.exe\shell\open\command

    • org: "C:\Python35\python.exe" "%1" "%*"

But that didn't do the job for me. I had to change my default python application as well.

Application dialog

As one can see I have 3 Python versions installed. It is impossible to see which is which here so I tried all three of them as my default python application. Eventually I was able to get my script arguments with one of these three.

0

By looking through the Windows registry, I found all the places where anything like Python36\pythonw.exe "%1" %* appears.

When I type python app.py args at the command prompt, everything works properly.

When I use just the app name (app.py args) Windows opens app.py in Python, but the app fails when it tries to access argv[1], because len(argv) is 1.

Apparently Windows knows enough to pass a py file to Python, but I can't figure out from looking at registry entries how it constructs the command. It appears to be using "%1" rather than "%1" %*.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.