63

I have a large string I need to parse, and I need to find all the instances of extract"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation, and store the index of each to a list.

So say this piece of string was in the beginning and middle of the larger string, both of them would be found, and their indexes would be added to the List. and the List would contain 0 and the other index whatever it would be.

I've been playing around, and the string.IndexOf does almost what I'm looking for, and I've written some code - but it's not working and I've been unable to figure out exactly what is wrong:

List<int> inst = new List<int>();
int index = 0;
while (index < source.LastIndexOf("extract\"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation", 0) + 39)
{
    int src = source.IndexOf("extract\"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation", index);
    inst.Add(src);
    index = src + 40;
}
  • inst = The list
  • source = The large string

Any better ideas?

12 Answers 12

115

Here's an example extension method for it:

public static List<int> AllIndexesOf(this string str, string value) {
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        throw new ArgumentException("the string to find may not be empty", "value");
    List<int> indexes = new List<int>();
    for (int index = 0;; index += value.Length) {
        index = str.IndexOf(value, index);
        if (index == -1)
            return indexes;
        indexes.Add(index);
    }
}

If you put this into a static class and import the namespace with using, it appears as a method on any string, and you can just do:

List<int> indexes = "fooStringfooBar".AllIndexesOf("foo");

For more information on extension methods, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx

Also the same using an iterator:

public static IEnumerable<int> AllIndexesOf(this string str, string value) {
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        throw new ArgumentException("the string to find may not be empty", "value");
    for (int index = 0;; index += value.Length) {
        index = str.IndexOf(value, index);
        if (index == -1)
            break;
        yield return index;
    }
}
  • 6
    Why not use IEnumerable<int> and yield return index instead of the indexes list? – m0sa Apr 15 '10 at 1:15
  • 1
    @m0sa: Good point. Added another version just for the fun of it. – Matti Virkkunen Apr 15 '10 at 8:28
  • 2
    @PedroC88: Using yield will make the code "lazy". It won't collect all the indexes into an in-memory list within the method. What kind of practical effect that has on performance depends on a lot of factors. – Matti Virkkunen Oct 2 '13 at 9:01
  • 1
    thnx dude it worked like a charm for me :D – virusivv Apr 21 '15 at 13:43
  • 5
    Attention! Due to adding value.Length you may miss nested matches! Example: "This is a NestedNestedNested match test!" with matching for "NestedNested" will find only one index, but not the nested one. To fix this just add +=1 in loop instead of +=value.Length. – Christoph Meißner Feb 22 '17 at 11:46
14

Why don't you use the built in RegEx class:

public static IEnumerable<int> GetAllIndexes(this string source, string matchString)
{
   matchString = Regex.Escape(matchString);
   foreach (Match match in Regex.Matches(source, matchString))
   {
      yield return match.Index;
   }
}

If you do need to reuse the expression then compile it and cache it somewhere. Change the matchString param to a Regex matchExpression in another overload for the reuse case.

  • This doesn't compile – Anshul Mar 7 '16 at 19:33
  • what is indexes? It's not defined anywhere. – Saggio Mar 21 '16 at 20:01
  • My bad it's a remnant. Delete that line. – csaam Mar 25 '16 at 1:24
  • Beware that this method has the same flaw as the accepted answer. If your source string is "ccc" and pattern is "cc" then it will return only one occurrence. – user280498 Jan 7 '18 at 6:22
8

using LINQ

public static IEnumerable<int> IndexOfAll(this string sourceString, string subString)
{
    return Regex.Matches(sourceString, subString).Cast<Match>().Select(m => m.Index);
}
  • 1
    You forgot to escape the subString though. – csaam Apr 15 '10 at 4:12
  • true ... true ... – ehosca Apr 15 '10 at 15:07
5

Polished version + case ignoring support:

public static int[] AllIndexesOf(string str, string substr, bool ignoreCase = false)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(str) ||
        string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(substr))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("String or substring is not specified.");
    }

    var indexes = new List<int>();
    int index = 0;

    while ((index = str.IndexOf(substr, index, ignoreCase ? StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase : StringComparison.Ordinal)) != -1)
    {
        indexes.Add(index++);
    }

    return indexes.ToArray();
}
1
public List<int> GetPositions(string source, string searchString)
{
    List<int> ret = new List<int>();
    int len = searchString.Length;
    int start = -len;
    while (true)
    {
        start = source.IndexOf(searchString, start + len);
        if (start == -1)
        {
            break;
        }
        else
        {
            ret.Add(start);
        }
    }
    return ret;
}

Call it like this:

List<int> list = GetPositions("bob is a chowder head bob bob sldfjl", "bob");
// list will contain 0, 22, 26
1

Hi nice answer by @Matti Virkkunen

public static List<int> AllIndexesOf(this string str, string value) {
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        throw new ArgumentException("the string to find may not be empty", "value");
    List<int> indexes = new List<int>();
    for (int index = 0;; index += value.Length) {
        index = str.IndexOf(value, index);
        if (index == -1)
            return indexes;
        indexes.Add(index);
        index--;
    }
}

But this covers tests cases like AOOAOOA where substring

are AOOA and AOOA

Output 0 and 3

1

Without Regex, using string comparison type:

string search = "123aa456AA789bb9991AACAA";
string pattern = "AA";
Enumerable.Range(0, search.Length)
   .Select(index => { return new { Index = index, Length = (index + pattern.Length) > search.Length ? search.Length - index : pattern.Length }; })
   .Where(searchbit => searchbit.Length == pattern.Length && pattern.Equals(search.Substring(searchbit.Index, searchbit.Length),StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
   .Select(searchbit => searchbit.Index)

This returns {3,8,19,22}. Empty pattern would match all positions.

For multiple patterns:

string search = "123aa456AA789bb9991AACAA";
string[] patterns = new string[] { "aa", "99" };
patterns.SelectMany(pattern => Enumerable.Range(0, search.Length)
   .Select(index => { return new { Index = index, Length = (index + pattern.Length) > search.Length ? search.Length - index : pattern.Length }; })
   .Where(searchbit => searchbit.Length == pattern.Length && pattern.Equals(search.Substring(searchbit.Index, searchbit.Length), StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
   .Select(searchbit => searchbit.Index))

This returns {3, 8, 19, 22, 15, 16}

1

I noticed that at least two proposed solutions don't handle overlapping search hits. I didn't check the one marked with the green checkmark. Here is one that handles overlapping search hits:

    public static List<int> GetPositions(this string source, string searchString)
    {
        List<int> ret = new List<int>();
        int len = searchString.Length;
        int start = -1;
        while (true)
        {
            start = source.IndexOf(searchString, start +1);
            if (start == -1)
            {
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                ret.Add(start);
            }
        }
        return ret;
    }
0

Based on the code I've used for finding multiple instances of a string within a larger string, your code would look like:

List<int> inst = new List<int>();
int index = 0;
while (index >=0)
{
    index = source.IndexOf("extract\"(me,i-have lots. of]punctuation", index);
    inst.Add(index);
    index++;
}
0
public static Dictionary<string, IEnumerable<int>> GetWordsPositions(this string input, string[] Susbtrings)
{
    Dictionary<string, IEnumerable<int>> WordsPositions = new Dictionary<string, IEnumerable<int>>();
    IEnumerable<int> IndexOfAll = null;
    foreach (string st in Susbtrings)
    {
        IndexOfAll = Regex.Matches(input, st).Cast<Match>().Select(m => m.Index);
        WordsPositions.Add(st, IndexOfAll);

    }
    return WordsPositions;
}
0

@csam is correct in theory, although his code will not complie and can be refractored to

public static IEnumerable<int> IndexOfAll(this string sourceString, string matchString)
{
    matchString = Regex.Escape(matchString);
    return from Match match in Regex.Matches(sourceString, matchString) select match.Index;
}
  • if his code was incorrect you could've edited his post to correct it – caesay Dec 13 '12 at 20:09
  • I hadn't noticed that. I have to admit to being reluctant to do that, just in case I am wrong, although I don't think I am. – arame3333 Dec 13 '12 at 22:49
  • that's not good idea to use regex for large string. The approach takes a lot of memory. – W92 Jul 2 '16 at 16:22
-1

I found this example and incorporated it into a function:

    public static int solution1(int A, int B)
    {
        // Check if A and B are in [0...999,999,999]
        if ( (A >= 0 && A <= 999999999) && (B >= 0 && B <= 999999999))
        {
            if (A == 0 && B == 0)
            {
                return 0;
            }
            // Make sure A < B
            if (A < B)
            {                    
                // Convert A and B to strings
                string a = A.ToString();
                string b = B.ToString();
                int index = 0;

                // See if A is a substring of B
                if (b.Contains(a))
                {
                    // Find index where A is
                    if (b.IndexOf(a) != -1)
                    {                            
                        while ((index = b.IndexOf(a, index)) != -1)
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine(A + " found at position " + index);
                            index++;
                        }
                        Console.ReadLine();
                        return b.IndexOf(a);
                    }
                    else
                        return -1;
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(A + " is not in " + B + ".");
                    Console.ReadLine();

                    return -1;
                }
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine(A + " must be less than " + B + ".");
               // Console.ReadLine();

                return -1;
            }                
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("A or B is out of range.");
            //Console.ReadLine();

            return -1;
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int A = 53, B = 1953786;
        int C = 78, D = 195378678;
        int E = 57, F = 153786;

        solution1(A, B);
        solution1(C, D);
        solution1(E, F);

        Console.WriteLine();
    }

Returns:

53 found at position 2

78 found at position 4
78 found at position 7

57 is not in 153786

  • Hi Mark, I see that you're new to stackoverflow. This answer doesn't add anything to this old question, there are already much better answers. If answering a question like this in the future, please try to explain why your answer contains some information or value which does not already exist in other answers. – caesay Feb 24 at 14:38

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