3

I'm building a REST API with flask-restful and one thing I'd like to enable is the ability to batch request resources, similar to how the Facebook Graph API works:

curl \
    -F 'access_token=…' \
    -F 'batch=[{"method":"GET", "relative_url":"me"},{"method":"GET", "relative_url":"me/friends?limit=50"}]' \
    https://graph.facebook.com

Which then returns an array with each request resolved with its status code and result:

[
    { "code": 200, 
      "headers":[
          { "name": "Content-Type", 
            "value": "text/javascript; charset=UTF-8" }
      ],
      "body": "{\"id\":\"…\"}"},
    { "code": 200,
      "headers":[
          { "name":"Content-Type", 
            "value":"text/javascript; charset=UTF-8"}
      ],
      "body":"{\"data\": [{…}]}}
]

I've been able to replicate this in flask-restful by simply looping over the requests and calling urlopen against my own app. This seems really inefficient and I have to think there's a better way. Is there a simpler and/or better way to make the requests against my own application from within a request handler?

2

Since you need to return headers my recommendation is that you send these batched requests into yourself (i.e. send the requests to localhost), that way the responses will be consistent with those that you would get when making individual calls.

Consider that when your API receives a batch request you will need at least one free worker to take on these indirect requests while the first worker blocks and waits. So you will need to have at least two workers. Even with this you risk a deadlock, if two batch requests arrive at the same time and take your two workers. So in reality you need to have as many workers as batch requests you expect to receive concurrently plus at least one more to handle the indirect requests.

Looking at this from another side, you will want to run as many of these indirect requests in parallel, because if they end up running one after another the benefit of using batch requests is lost. So you also need to have sufficient number of workers to allow for parallelism.

In all honesty I don't see this as a great feature. In most client-side languages it is fairly easy to execute several requests in parallel, so you don't need to provide this is a server-side feature. Specially easy if you are using Javascript, but also easy in Python, Ruby, etc.

  • Thanks Miguel. I was mainly implementing it for mobile application consumers of the API, but a) they also can execute parallel requests pretty simply and b) I think you're right that the benefits aren't really worth it. Thanks for the info and the bit about the deadlock alone makes me realize it isn't worth it at all. – Richard Bender Oct 17 '14 at 10:15
1

You can use just Flask to execute the individual requests submitted in the batch as follows.

Batch Request

[
    {
        "method" : <string:method>,
        "path"   : <string:path>,
        "body"   : <string:body>
    },
    {
        "method" : <string:method>,
        "path"   : <string:path>,
        "body"   : <string:body>
    }
]

Batch Response

[
    {
        "status"   : <int:status_code>,
        "response" : <string:response>
    },
    {
        "status"   : <int:status_code>,
        "response" : <string:response>
    }
]

Sample Code

def _read_response(response):
    output = StringIO.StringIO()
    try:
        for line in response.response:
            output.write(line)

        return output.getvalue()

    finally:
        output.close()

@app.route('/batch', methods=['POST'])
def batch(username):
    """
    Execute multiple requests, submitted as a batch.

    :statuscode 207: Multi status
    """
    try:
        requests = json.loads(request.data)
    except ValueError as e:
        abort(400)

    responses = []

    for index, req in enumerate(requests):
        method = req['method']
        path = req['path']
        body = req.get('body', None)

        with app.app_context():
            with app.test_request_context(path, method=method, data=body):
                try:
                    # Can modify flask.g here without affecting flask.g of the root request for the batch

                    # Pre process Request
                    rv = app.preprocess_request()

                    if rv is None:
                        # Main Dispatch
                        rv = app.dispatch_request()

                except Exception as e:
                    rv = app.handle_user_exception(e)

                response = app.make_response(rv)

                # Post process Request
                response = app.process_response(response)

        # Response is a Flask response object.
        # _read_response(response) reads response.response and returns a string. If your endpoints return JSON object,
        # this string would be the response as a JSON string.
        responses.append({
            "status": response.status_code,
            "response": _read_response(response)
        })

    return make_response(json.dumps(responses), 207, HEADERS)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.