1

Here's the problem: https://projecteuler.net/problem=15

I've come up with a pattern which I thought would work for this and I've looked at what other people have done and they've done the same thing, such as here: http://code.jasonbhill.com/python/project-euler-problem-15/ But I always get a different answer. Here's my code.

import java.util.*;
public class Problem15 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayList<Long> list = new ArrayList<Long>();
        list.add((long)1);
        int size;
        for (int x = 1;x<20;x++){
            size = list.size();
            for(int y = 1;y<size;y++){
                    long sum = list.get(y-1)+list.get(y);
                    list.set(y, sum);
            }
        list.add(list.get(size-1)*2);
        System.out.println(list);
        }
    }
}

edit: In response to Edward, I think my method is currently what you said before your edit in that this isn't about brute force but I'm just summing the possible ways from each point in the grid. However, I don't need a 2d array to do this because I'm only looking at possible moves from only the side. Here's something I drew up to hopefully explain my process. My Method

So for a 1x1. Like you said, once you reach the limit of one direction, you can only travel in the limit of the other, so there's 2 ways. This isn't particularly helpful for a 1x1 but it is for larger ones. For a 2x2, you know that the top corner, being the limit of right, only has 1 possible path from that point. The same logic applies to the bottom corner. And, because you have a square which you have already solved for, a 1x1, you know that the middle point has 2 paths from there. Now, if you look at the sides, you see that the point for instance that has 2 beneath it and 1 to the right has the sum of the number of paths in those adjacent points so then that point must have 3 paths. Same for the other side, giving the top left corner the sum of 3 and 3, or 2 times 3.

Now if you look at my code, that's what it's trying to do. The element with index 0 is always 1, and for the rest of the array, it adds together the previous term and itself and replaces the current term. Lastly, to find the total number of paths, it just doubles the last number. So if the program were to try and solve for a 4x4, the array would currently look like {1, 4, 10, 20}. So the program would change it to {1, 5, 10, 20}, then {1, 5, 15, 20}, then {1, 5, 15, 35}, and finally, adds the total number of paths, {1, 5, 15, 35, 70}. I think this is what you were trying to explain to me in your answer however my answer always comes out incorrect.

  • 1
    Probably you need a 2d-ArrayList! – Am_I_Helpful Oct 17 '14 at 4:17
  • It can be done with 1D array: QWORD tab[40] ... 64bit unsigned ints result can not fit in 32bit so check if your datatypes are not 32bits – Spektre Oct 17 '14 at 7:51
5

Realize that it's more about mathematical complexity than brute force searching.

You have a two dimensional array of points, where you can chose to only travel away from the origin in the x or the y direction. As such, you can represent your travel like so:

(0, 0), (1, 0), (1, 1), (2, 1), (2, 2)

some things become immediately obvious. The first one is that any path through the mess is going to require x + y steps, travelling through x + y + 1 locations. It is a feature of a Manhattan distance style path.

The second is that at any one point until you hit the maximum x or y, you can select either of the two options (x or y); but, as soon as one or the other is at it's limit, the only option left is to chose the non-maximum value repeatedly until it also becomes a maximum.

With this you might have enough of a hint to solve the math problem. Then you won't even need to search through the different paths to get an algorithm that can solve the problem.

--- edited to give a bit more of a hint ---

Each two dimensional array of paths can be broken down into smaller two dimensional arrays of paths. So the solution to f(3, 5) where the function f yields the number of paths is equal to f(2, 5) + f(3, 4). Note that f(0, 5) directly equals 1, as does f(3, 0) because you no longer have "choices" when the paths are forced to be linear.

Once you model the function, you don't even need the array to walk the paths....

f(1, 1) = f(0, 1) + f(1, 0)
f(0, 1) = 1
f(1, 0) = 1
f(1, 1) = 1 + 1
f(1, 1) = 2

and for a set of 3 x 3 verticies (like the example cited has)

f(2, 2) = f(1, 2) + f(2, 1)
f(1, 2) = f(0, 1) + f(1, 1)

(from before)

f(1, 1) = 2
f(0, 2) = 1
f(1, 2) = 2 + 1 = 3

likewise (because it's the mirror image)

f(2, 1) = 1 + 2 = 3

so

f(2, 2) = 3 + 3 = 6

--- last edit (I hope!) ---

Ok, so now you may get the idea that you have really two choices (go down) or (go right). Consider a bag containing four "commands", 2 of "go down" and 2 of "go right". How many different ways can you select the commands from the bag?

Such a "selection" is a permutation, but since we are selecting all of them, it is a special type of permutation called an "order" or "ordering".

The number of binomial (one or the other) orderings is ruled by the mathematical formula

number of orderings = (A + B)!/(A! * B!)

where A is the "count" of items of type A, and B is the "count" of items of type B

3x3 vertices, 2 down choices, 2 right choices

number of orderings = (2+2)!/2!*2!

4!/1*2*1*2
1*2*3*4/1*2*1*2
(1*2)*3*4/(1*2)*1*2
3*4/2
12/2
6

You could probably do a 20*20 by hand if you needed, but the factorial formula is simple enough to do by computer (although keep an eye you don't ruin the answer with an integer overflow).

0

Another implementation:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int n = 20;
    long matrix[][] = new long[n][n];
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        matrix[i][0] = i + 2;
        matrix[0][i] = i + 2;
    }
    for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = i; j < n; j++) {      // j>=i
            matrix[i][j] = matrix[i - 1][j] + matrix[i][j - 1];
            matrix[j][i] = matrix[i][j];   // avoids double computation (difference)
        }
    }
    System.out.println(matrix[n - 1][n - 1]);
}

Time: 43 microseconds (without printing)

It is based on the following matrix:

   | 1  2  3  4 ...
---------------------
 1 | 2  3  4  5 ...
 2 | 3  6  10 15
 3 | 4  10 20 35
 4 | 5  15 35 70
 . | .
 . | .
 . | .

where

6  =  3 +  3
10 =  6 +  4
15 = 10 +  5
...
70 = 35 + 35

Notice that I used i + 2 instead of i + 1 in the implementation because the first index is 0.


Of course, the fastest solution is to use a mathematical formula (see Edwin's post) and the code for it:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int n = 20;
    long result = 1;
    for ( int i = 1 ; i <= n ; i++ ) {
        result *= (i+n);
        result /= i;
    }
    System.out.println(result);
}

takes only 5 microseconds (without printing).

If you are afraid about the loss of precision, notice that the product of n consecutive numbers is divisible by n!.

To have a better understanding why the formula is:

     (d+r)!
F = ---------  , where |D| = d and |R| = r
      d!*r!

instead of F = (d+r)!, imagine that every "down" and "right" has an index:

down1,right1,right2,down2,down3,right3

The second formula counts all possible permutations for the "commands" above, but in our case there is no difference between down1, down2 and down3. So, the second formula will count 6 (3!) times the same thing:

down1,down2,down3
down1,down3,down2
down2,down1,down3
down2,down3,down1
down3,down1,down2
down3,down2,down1

This is why we divide the (d+r)! by d!. Analogue for r!.

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