1

This question already has an answer here:

I was just studying OCJP questions and I found this strange code:

public class abc {
    public static void main(String[] args) {


        System.out.println(0.0%0.0!=0.0/0.0);// it return true

        System.out.println(0.0%0.0==0.0/0.0);// it return false


    }

}

When I ran the code, I got:

true
false

How is the output false when we're comparing two things that look the same as each other? What does NaN mean?

marked as duplicate by user177800 Oct 19 '14 at 4:06

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  • They don't look the same to me at all. Or rather, they look about as same as 3/4 as 3**4 – John Dvorak Oct 17 '14 at 6:01
  • Why do you think the equality should be true? – John Dvorak Oct 17 '14 at 6:04
3

Both 0.0 / 0.0 and 0.0 % 0.0 return Double.NaN.

If you compare Double.NaN == Double.NaN you will receive false and this is why System.out.println(0.0%0.0==0.0/0.0); prints false.

The question now goes to why does Double.NaN == Double.NaN return false?

According to JLS:

Floating-point operators produce no exceptions (§11). An operation that overflows produces a signed infinity, an operation that underflows produces a denormalized value or a signed zero, and an operation that has no mathematically definite result produces NaN. All numeric operations with NaN as an operand produce NaN as a result. As has already been described, NaN is unordered, so a numeric comparison operation involving one or two NaNs returns false and any != comparison involving NaN returns true, including x!=x when x is NaN.

More info:

  • Interstingly, the byte code is : 0: getstatic #16; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream; 3: iconst_1 4: invokevirtual #22; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Z)V 7: getstatic #16; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream; 10: iconst_0 11: invokevirtual #22; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Z)V 14: return ... I don't understand why 0 and 1 are being loaded onto the stack here . – TheLostMind Oct 17 '14 at 7:10

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