11

Currently, I have the following 2 functions:

void write_to_file(FILE *fp)
{
    fprintf(fp, "stuff here: %d", 10);
    /* 1000s of similar lines below */
}

and

void write_to_string(char *str)
{
    sprintf(str, "stuff here: %d", 10);
    /* 1000s of similar lines below */
}

I'd like to poly morph it into a single function. I'd thought about something like:

void write_somewhere(void *ptr, int to_file)
{
    if (to_file) {
        typedef fprintf myprintf;
    } else {
        typedef sprintf myprintf;
    }
    myprintf(ptr, "stuff here: %d", 10);
}

This doesn't work and looks ugly.

Since the signature of fprintf and sprintf are different and as follows,

int fprintf(FILE *stream, const char *format, …);
int sprintf(char *buffer, const char *format, …);

Is it possible to do something like,

void write_somewhere(void *ptr, void *func)
{
    func(ptr, "stuff here: %d", 10);
}

EDIT: Based on Alter's answer below, this is what I have but it doesn't quite work as expected and prints out garbage value when trying to print out values in write_somewhere() function:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

typedef int (*myprintf_t) (void *, const char *, ...);

int myfprintf(void *ptr, const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    int ret;

    va_start(args, format);
    ret = vfprintf(ptr, format, args);
    va_end(args);
    return ret;
}

int mysprintf(void *ptr, const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    int ret;

    va_start(args, format);
    ret = vsprintf(ptr, format, args);
    va_end(args);
    return ret;
}

void write_somewhere(void *ptr, myprintf_t myprintf, const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    int ret;

    va_start(args, format);
    ret = myprintf(ptr, format, args);
    va_end(args);
    return ret;
}

int main(void)
{
    char s[100];
    int i = 100;

    /* This works */
    write_somewhere(stdout, myprintf, "Hello world");

    /* This prints out garbage */
    write_somewhere(stdout, myprintf, "Hello world, I am %d", i);
    write_somewhere(s, mysprintf);
    return 0;
}
  • That design looks a little odd. In order to know if the string is large enough to hold the result, the caller needs to know that it's a string. – mafso Oct 17 '14 at 6:53
  • Your edit asks a completely new question. Changing (or extending) the question substantially may invalidate answers. Anyway, the signature of your myprintf_t is now int (*myprintf_t) (void *, const char *, va_list args) and implementations of such functions don't need the va_something macros. Instead they can just return the result of v*printf. – M Oehm Oct 17 '14 at 10:06
  • I'm not sure I understand. How should I call myprintf without passing variable args? Could you show it with code? or edit the code above? – Nikhil Oct 17 '14 at 10:12
  • The code is already there in your example. There are two concepts of variadic arguments. First, the ... notation, which you cannot access directly, but via the va_list and via the va_arg macro. Second, the va_list itself, which contains the arguments in some opaque way. You can pass variadic args as ... only at the first level, after that you have to pass the va_list. That's why there are the v*printf functions in the first place: So that you can write your own printf functions without re-implementing all the format stuff. – M Oehm Oct 17 '14 at 10:17
  • Right. I understood that. But my question is what is wrong in the above code. Why is it printing garbage when it runs write_somewhere(stdout, myprintf, "Hello world, I am %d", i); – Nikhil Oct 17 '14 at 10:21
9

Jen‘s answer is the correct one, but in this case you can redirect ptr to v*printf using a pointer to function:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

int myfprintf(void *ptr, const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    int ret;

    va_start(args, format);
    ret = vfprintf(ptr, format, args);
    va_end(args);
    return ret;
}

int mysprintf(void *ptr, const char *format, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    int ret;

    va_start(args, format);
    ret = vsprintf(ptr, format, args);
    va_end(args);
    return ret;
}

void write_somewhere(void *ptr, int (*myprintf)(void *, const char *, ...))
{
    myprintf(ptr, "stuff here");
}

int main(void)
{
    char s[100];

    write_somewhere(stdout, myfprintf);
    write_somewhere(s, mysprintf);
    return 0;
}

For your last edit:

It seems that you want to pass some extras parameters to write_somewhere, in this case I suggest:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

#define TO_FILE 0
#define TO_STRING 1

void write_somewhere(int where, void *ptr, const char *format, ...)
{
    #define myprintf(ptr, ...) \
    (where == TO_FILE ? vfprintf(ptr, __VA_ARGS__) : vsprintf(ptr, __VA_ARGS__))

    va_list args;
    va_start(args, format);
    myprintf(ptr, format, args);
    /* more stuff */
    va_end(args);
    #undef myprintf
}

int main(void)
{
    char s[100];

    write_somewhere(TO_FILE, stdout, "%u\n", 10);
    write_somewhere(TO_STRING, s, "Hello");
    printf("%s\n", s);
    return 0;
}
  • This looks good. I slightly modified "write_somewhere" to void write_somewhere(void *ptr, int (*myprintf)(void *, const char *, ...), const char *format, ...)) so that it can take variable arguments but that doesn't seem to work – Nikhil Oct 17 '14 at 8:10
  • I think the write_somwhere function should resolve the variadic arguments and the callbacks must be modelled along the v*printf functions. – M Oehm Oct 17 '14 at 8:16
  • @M Oehm, great, but then you need an extra parameter, isn‘t it? – David Ranieri Oct 17 '14 at 8:32
  • Well, at the moment the write_somewhere takes arguments to tell it where to print and how, but not what. – M Oehm Oct 17 '14 at 8:36
  • 1
    Okay, I'm sorry, I hadn't understood how the OP wants to use the function. write_somewhere really only relays where the stuff should be printed. – M Oehm Oct 17 '14 at 8:37
7

The C language guarantees that all function pointers have the same representation. Your polymorphic functions simply needs to be prototyped as accepting any function pointer, say, a void (*funcptr)(void). Note that a ptr-to-void is not a function pointer (it's an object pointer) and may not be able to hold a function pointer.

Of course you can only call the function if you know which of the several types it is. So you need some way to discriminate, much like printf does by looking at the format. If you call a function with arguments not matching its prototype, the behavior is undefined.

  • I'm not sure of that. I believe that the C standard guarantees that all function pointers of the same signature have the same representation. I guess that an implementation where functions returning int and void functions have different internal representations (e.g. different sizeof) is conforming to C99 standard (but not to POSIX). I know no such C implementation. – Basile Starynkevitch Oct 17 '14 at 7:01
  • 3
    @BasileStarynkevitch, no, function pointers must have compatible representations that allows to call the function with the correct prototype, this 6.3.2.3 p 6. Jens' answer is correct. – Jens Gustedt Oct 17 '14 at 7:34
3

Not an answer to your exact question, but instead of writing write_something() as you have, you could change the structure slightly:


void write_somewhere(void *ptr, int to_file)
{
    if (to_file) {
        fprintf( (FILE*) ptr, "stuff here");
    } else {
        sprintf( (char*) ptr, "stuff here");
    }
}

However, for a strict answer to your question... As you've found, the typedef line that you've attempted doesn't work. typedef is a compile time operation, not a runtime operation.

What you could do, though, is to define a type for a function pointer that matches both the fprintf() and sprintf() functions:


typedef int (*someprintf_ptr)(FILE *stream, const char *format, …);

The write_somewhere() would then look like:


void write_somewhere(void *ptr, someprintf_ptr func)
{
    func(ptr, "stuff here");
}

/* with calls looking like... */
write_somewhere( (void *)a_file_ptr, (someprintf_ptr)(fprintf));
2

Your write_something function would have to be something like:

void write_something(void (*function)(),  int to_file) 
{
   ....
}
1

Try making myprintf a function

void write_somewhere(void *ptr, int to_file)
{
    myprintf(to_file, ptr, "stuff here");
    // do stuff
    /* 1000s of similar lines below */
}

void myprintf( int to_file, void *ptr, char *output )
{
    if (to_file)
        fprintf( ptr, output );
    else
        sprintf( ptr, output );
}
1

Let me try:

struct target {
    int (*tgtfunction)();
    void* ptr;
}

struct target mktarget_file(FILE * fp) {
    struct target tgt = { .tgtfuntion = vfprintf, .ptr = fp };
    return tgt;
}

struct target mktarget_string(char * str) {
    struct target tgt = { .tgtfuntion = vsprintf; .ptr = str };
    return tgt;
}

void tgtprintf(struct target * target, char * fmt, ...) {
    va_list ap;
    va_start(ap, target);
    int ret = target.tgtfunction(target.ptr, fmt, ap);
    va_end(ap);
    return ret;
}

void write_stuff(struct target * target)
{
    tgtprintf(target, "stuff here");
    /* 1000s of similar lines below */
}

should do what you want: create a struct target for your wanted target, and just call write_stuff to write your stuff there.

Be aware that the sprintf stuff might need to be refined, as each string is written to the same place instead of appended, and there is no check for free space. But the general concept could start like this.

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