I want to make a centered circular image from rectangle photo. The photo's dimensions is unknown. Usually it's a rectangle form. I've tried a lot of methods:

CSS:

.image-cropper {
    max-width: 100px;
    height: auto;
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.image-cropper img{
    display: block;
    margin: 0 auto;
    height: auto;
    width: 150%; 
    margin: 0 0 0 -20%;
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    -ms-border-radius: 50%;
    -o-border-radius: 50%;
    border-radius: 50%;  
}

HTML:

<div class="image-cropper">
    <img src="http://www.electricvelocity.com.au/Upload/Blogs/smart-e-bike-side_2.jpg" class="rounded" />
</div>
  • i sit fine??? jsfiddle.net/7c9wjLy6/3 – Manjunath Siddappa Oct 17 '14 at 8:54
  • Is there a reason you have margin specified twice with different values? – gleenn Aug 29 '16 at 20:41
  • might want to correct the question with removing "Usually", if it is that then none of the css solutions wont cut it. – Dejan.S Nov 28 '17 at 11:04
up vote 74 down vote accepted

The approach is wrong, you need to apply the border-radius to the container div instead of the actual image.

This would work:

.image-cropper {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
    border-radius: 50%;
}

img {
    display: inline;
    margin: 0 auto;
    height: 100%;
    width: auto;
}
<div class="image-cropper">
    <img src="http://www.electricvelocity.com.au/Upload/Blogs/smart-e-bike-side_2.jpg" class="rounded" />
</div>

  • 3
    Understood. But why image is not centered in the circle? – 49volro Oct 17 '14 at 9:38
  • True. I think Hiral's solution better suits your needs, and the background-image can be fed dynamically by Wordpress with ease. For some reason I can't solve my solution with text-align: center; so I cant really help you with the centring at the moment :( – Johnny Kutnowski Oct 17 '14 at 9:52
  • This solution does not work with images in landscape orientation. – Wolfgang Ziegler Feb 3 '16 at 9:50
  • 1
    @49volro if you want the image to be centered, giving it a margin-left of -25% will do the trick. – Cameron637 Jun 15 '16 at 16:20

If you can live without the <img> tag, I suggest you use the photo as a background image.

.cropcircle{
    width: 250px;
    height: 250px;
    border-radius: 100%;
    background: #eee no-repeat center;
    background-size: cover;
}

#image1{
    background-image: url(http://www.voont.com/files/images/edit/7-ridiculous-ways-boost-self-esteem/happy.jpg);
}
<div id="image1" class="cropcircle"></div>

Try this:

img {
    height: auto;
    width: 100%;
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    -ms-border-radius: 50%;
    -o-border-radius: 50%;
    border-radius: 50%;
}

DEMO here.

OR:

.rounded {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 50%;
    -moz-border-radius: 50%;
    -ms-border-radius: 50%;
    -o-border-radius: 50%;
    border-radius: 50%;
    background:url("http://www.electricvelocity.com.au/Upload/Blogs/smart-e-bike-side_2.jpg") center no-repeat;
    background-size:cover;
}

DEMO here.

  • Squeezed.. Uhh, I can't upload image to show you – 49volro Oct 17 '14 at 8:59
  • 1
    Your demo is not circular. – Paulie_D Oct 17 '14 at 8:59
  • Nice, but I can't use background-image because image's URL will generate Wordpress. Can I write: <div class="image-cropper"> <img class="rounded" style="background:url('http://www.electricvelocity.com.au/Upload/Blogs/smart-e-bike-side_2.jpg') center no-repeat; background-size:cover;" /> </div> ? – 49volro Oct 17 '14 at 9:19
  • @49volro In such case you can write this: <div class="rounded" style="background-image:url('image url')"></div>, remove image url from css – Hiral Oct 17 '14 at 9:24
  • The example worked for me, except it blew up my image. It worked if I put the image inside a div tag and specified the image dimensions in the div. – John D. Cook Jun 30 '17 at 14:48

The object-fit property provides a non-hackish way for doing this (with image centered). It has been supported in major browsers for a few years now (Chrome/Safari since 2013, Firefox since 2015, and Edge since 2015) with the exception of Internet Explorer.

img.rounded {
  object-fit: cover;
  border-radius: 50%;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
}
<img src="http://www.electricvelocity.com.au/Upload/Blogs/smart-e-bike-side_2.jpg" class="rounded">

  • Brilliant! I love this simple, one-step solution. I has to remove the img from the css you provided and add it as a class to the image, but it worked like a charm! Thank you! – jord8on May 29 at 7:03
  • This should be the accepted answer these days. – Chris Turner Nov 10 at 2:03

Johnny's solution is good. I found that adding min-width:100%, really helps images fill the entire circle. You could do this with a combination of JavaScript to get optimal results or use ImageMagick - http://www.imagemagick.org/script/index.php if you're really serious about getting it right.

.image-cropper {

  width: 35px;

  height: 35px;

  position: relative;

  overflow: hidden;

  border-radius: 50%;

}

.image-cropper__image {

  display: inline;

  margin: 0 auto;

  height: 100%;

  min-width: 100%;

}
<div class="image-cropper">
  <img src="#" class="image-cropper__image">
</div>

insert the image and then backhand all you need is:

<style>
img {
  border-radius: 50%;
}
</style>

** the image code will be here automatically**

I know many of the solutions mentioned above works, you can as well try flex.

But my image was rectangular and not fitting properly. so this is what i did.

.parentDivClass {
    position: relative;
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    overflow: hidden;
    border-radius: 50%;
    margin: 20px;
    display: flex;
    justify-content: center;
}

and for the image inside, you can use,

child Img {
    display: block;
    margin: 0 auto;
    height: 100%;
    width: auto;
}

This is helpful when you are using bootstrap 4 classes.

You need to use jQuery to do this. This approach gives you the abbility to have dynamic images and do them round no matter the size.

My demo has one flaw right now I don't center the image in the container, but ill return to it in a minute (need to finish a script I'm working on).

DEMO

<div class="container">
    <img src="" class="image" alt="lambo" />
</div>

//script
var container = $('.container'),
    image = container.find('img');

container.width(image.height());


//css    
.container {
    height: auto;
    overflow: hidden;
    border-radius: 50%;    
}

.image {
    height: 100%;    
    display: block;    
}
  • 1
    Definitely don't need jQuery. See accepted answer or @Tom's – abettermap Feb 19 '17 at 3:05
  • @abettermap those solution don't have dynamic height, if you read the question, "Usually it's a rectangle form." meaning not always, therefor I get the image height with javascript. Seo value is lost with Toms solution. So read and think best pracitce also before downvoting. – Dejan.S Feb 20 '17 at 11:14
  • The answers using background-image have dynamic height in the sense that the image will fill the circular space regardless of what the height is, which I think was the OP's goal. Re: best practices, I think some might argue that not using JS for styling would be best practice. You have a point with SEO, however, so I will edit your response. Feel free to edit further. – abettermap Feb 26 '17 at 18:32
  • Evidently I can't remove a downvote until the answer is edited... – abettermap Feb 26 '17 at 18:51

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