332

I have an array of hashes:

[
  { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 2 },
  { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 3 },
  { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 5 },
]

I am trying to sort this array in descending order according to the value of :bar in each hash.

I am using sort_by to sort above array:

a.sort_by { |h| h[:bar] }

However, this sorts the array in ascending order. How do I make it sort in descending order?

One solution was to do following:

a.sort_by { |h| -h[:bar] }

But that negative sign does not seem appropriate.

6
  • 5
    Given the other options I still think -h[:bar] is the most elegant. What do you not like about it? Apr 15, 2010 at 10:34
  • 3
    I was much more interested on conveying the intent of code.
    – Waseem
    Apr 17, 2010 at 9:58
  • 1
    @Waseem could I trouble you to update the accepted answer?
    – colllin
    Feb 22, 2013 at 3:05
  • 7
    @Waseem There's nothing wrong with the current answer. There's just happens to be a far better answer. the Tin Man's answer is much more thorough and shows that sort_by.reverse is dramatically more efficient than the currently accepted answer. I believe it also better addresses the concern you mentioned above for "conveying the intent of code". On top of that, the Tin Man has updated his answer for the current version of ruby. This question has been viewed over 15k times. If you can save even 1 second of each viewer's time, I think it's worth it.
    – colllin
    Feb 26, 2013 at 5:36
  • 2
    Here it is 2016 and we have another way (since v2.2): arr.max_by(arr.size) { |h| h[:bar] } #=> [{:foo=>"foo", :bar=>5}, {:foo=>"foo", :bar=>3}, {:foo=>"foo", :bar=>2}]. May 24, 2016 at 6:57

8 Answers 8

662

It's always enlightening to do a benchmark on the various suggested answers. Here's what I found out:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

require 'benchmark'

ary = []
1000.times { 
  ary << {:bar => rand(1000)} 
}

n = 500
Benchmark.bm(20) do |x|
  x.report("sort")               { n.times { ary.sort{ |a,b| b[:bar] <=> a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort reverse")       { n.times { ary.sort{ |a,b| a[:bar] <=> b[:bar] }.reverse } }
  x.report("sort_by -a[:bar]")   { n.times { ary.sort_by{ |a| -a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort_by a[:bar]*-1") { n.times { ary.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar]*-1 } } }
  x.report("sort_by.reverse!")   { n.times { ary.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar] }.reverse } }
end

                          user     system      total        real
sort                  3.960000   0.010000   3.970000 (  3.990886)
sort reverse          4.040000   0.000000   4.040000 (  4.038849)
sort_by -a[:bar]      0.690000   0.000000   0.690000 (  0.692080)
sort_by a[:bar]*-1    0.700000   0.000000   0.700000 (  0.699735)
sort_by.reverse!      0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.654447)

I think it's interesting that @Pablo's sort_by{...}.reverse! is fastest. Before running the test I thought it would be slower than "-a[:bar]" but negating the value turns out to take longer than it does to reverse the entire array in one pass. It's not much of a difference, but every little speed-up helps.


Please note that these results are different in Ruby 1.9

Here are results for Ruby 1.9.3p194 (2012-04-20 revision 35410) [x86_64-darwin10.8.0]:

                           user     system      total        real
sort                   1.340000   0.010000   1.350000 (  1.346331)
sort reverse           1.300000   0.000000   1.300000 (  1.310446)
sort_by -a[:bar]       0.430000   0.000000   0.430000 (  0.429606)
sort_by a[:bar]*-1     0.420000   0.000000   0.420000 (  0.414383)
sort_by.reverse!       0.400000   0.000000   0.400000 (  0.401275)

These are on an old MacBook Pro. Newer, or faster machines, will have lower values, but the relative differences will remain.


Here's a bit updated version on newer hardware and the 2.1.1 version of Ruby:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

require 'benchmark'

puts "Running Ruby #{RUBY_VERSION}"

ary = []
1000.times {
  ary << {:bar => rand(1000)}
}

n = 500

puts "n=#{n}"
Benchmark.bm(20) do |x|
  x.report("sort")               { n.times { ary.dup.sort{ |a,b| b[:bar] <=> a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort reverse")       { n.times { ary.dup.sort{ |a,b| a[:bar] <=> b[:bar] }.reverse } }
  x.report("sort_by -a[:bar]")   { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| -a[:bar] } } }
  x.report("sort_by a[:bar]*-1") { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar]*-1 } } }
  x.report("sort_by.reverse")    { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar] }.reverse } }
  x.report("sort_by.reverse!")   { n.times { ary.dup.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar] }.reverse! } }
end

# >> Running Ruby 2.1.1
# >> n=500
# >>                            user     system      total        real
# >> sort                   0.670000   0.000000   0.670000 (  0.667754)
# >> sort reverse           0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.655582)
# >> sort_by -a[:bar]       0.260000   0.010000   0.270000 (  0.255919)
# >> sort_by a[:bar]*-1     0.250000   0.000000   0.250000 (  0.258924)
# >> sort_by.reverse        0.250000   0.000000   0.250000 (  0.245179)
# >> sort_by.reverse!       0.240000   0.000000   0.240000 (  0.242340)

New results running the above code using Ruby 2.2.1 on a more recent Macbook Pro. Again, the exact numbers aren't important, it's their relationships:

Running Ruby 2.2.1
n=500
                           user     system      total        real
sort                   0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.653191)
sort reverse           0.650000   0.000000   0.650000 (  0.648761)
sort_by -a[:bar]       0.240000   0.010000   0.250000 (  0.245193)
sort_by a[:bar]*-1     0.240000   0.000000   0.240000 (  0.240541)
sort_by.reverse        0.230000   0.000000   0.230000 (  0.228571)
sort_by.reverse!       0.230000   0.000000   0.230000 (  0.230040)

Updated for Ruby 2.7.1 on a Mid-2015 MacBook Pro:

Running Ruby 2.7.1
n=500     
                           user     system      total        real
sort                   0.494707   0.003662   0.498369 (  0.501064)
sort reverse           0.480181   0.005186   0.485367 (  0.487972)
sort_by -a[:bar]       0.121521   0.003781   0.125302 (  0.126557)
sort_by a[:bar]*-1     0.115097   0.003931   0.119028 (  0.122991)
sort_by.reverse        0.110459   0.003414   0.113873 (  0.114443)
sort_by.reverse!       0.108997   0.001631   0.110628 (  0.111532)

...the reverse method doesn't actually return a reversed array - it returns an enumerator that just starts at the end and works backwards.

The source for Array#reverse is:

               static VALUE
rb_ary_reverse_m(VALUE ary)
{
    long len = RARRAY_LEN(ary);
    VALUE dup = rb_ary_new2(len);

    if (len > 0) {
        const VALUE *p1 = RARRAY_CONST_PTR_TRANSIENT(ary);
        VALUE *p2 = (VALUE *)RARRAY_CONST_PTR_TRANSIENT(dup) + len - 1;
        do *p2-- = *p1++; while (--len > 0);
    }
    ARY_SET_LEN(dup, RARRAY_LEN(ary));
    return dup;
}

do *p2-- = *p1++; while (--len > 0); is copying the pointers to the elements in reverse order if I remember my C correctly, so the array is reversed.

13
  • 1
    The times got better with 1.9.3, but sort_by is still faster, as is sort_by.reverse!. Sep 17, 2012 at 5:56
  • 10
    @theTinMan Can you please provide a TL;DR for your answer. All this benchmark information is quite useful. But a TL;DR on top of the answer will be useful for people who just want the answer. I know they should read the whole explanation and I think they will. Still a TL;DR will be quite useful IMHO. Thanks for your effort.
    – Waseem
    Feb 26, 2013 at 18:45
  • 4
    The TL;DR answer is to read the results. This is important information to know, so either skim it, or study it, either way take what you get from it. FYI, if you were on my team I'm give you a test on it if I thought you skimmed it. Jun 25, 2013 at 4:26
  • 9
    I agree with @Waseem. As well-researched as this answer is, the OP did not ask "what's the fastest way to do a descending sort in Ruby". A TL;DR at the top showing simple uses, followed by the benchmarks, would improve this answer IMO.
    – user2189331
    Jan 9, 2015 at 0:57
  • 2
    TL;DR use sort_by().reverse or .reverse! unless you care about memory. Feb 28, 2017 at 11:30
103

Just a quick thing, that denotes the intent of descending order.

descending = -1
a.sort_by { |h| h[:bar] * descending }

(Will think of a better way in the mean time) ;)


a.sort_by { |h| h[:bar] }.reverse!
4
  • Pablo, nice job on finding a better way! See the benchmark I did. Apr 16, 2010 at 6:25
  • the first method is faster (though maybe uglier) because it only loops once. As for the second, you don't need the !, that's for inplace operations.
    – tokland
    Nov 19, 2010 at 12:13
  • 5
    If you don't use the bang after reverse you won't be reversing the array but creating another one that's reversed. Nov 19, 2010 at 15:17
  • Does anyone know if the reverse is an O(N) operation or if it does something clever internally with the pointers? I guess it creates a new one it has to be O(N), but is the reverse! also?
    – user137717
    May 2, 2022 at 20:43
60

You could do:

a.sort{|a,b| b[:bar] <=> a[:bar]}
3
  • 6
    but the whole point of using sort_by was that it avoided running the comparison function so many times
    – user102008
    Sep 28, 2011 at 19:33
  • 3
    -1. sort_by is so much more efficient, and more readable. Negating the value or doing a reverse at the end will be faster and more readable. Nov 5, 2012 at 1:20
  • 1
    I like this answer because * -1 doesn't work with all values (e.g. Time), and reverse will re-order values that sorted as equal Feb 7, 2020 at 16:21
11

I see that we have (beside others) basically two options:

a.sort_by { |h| -h[:bar] }

and

a.sort_by { |h| h[:bar] }.reverse

While both ways give you the same result when your sorting key is unique, keep in mind that the reverse way will reverse the order of keys that are equal.

Example:

a = [{foo: 1, bar: 1},{foo: 2,bar: 1}]
a.sort_by {|h| -h[:bar]}
 => [{:foo=>1, :bar=>1}, {:foo=>2, :bar=>1}]
a.sort_by {|h| h[:bar]}.reverse
 => [{:foo=>2, :bar=>1}, {:foo=>1, :bar=>1}]

While you often don't need to care about this, sometimes you do. To avoid such behavior you could introduce a second sorting key (that for sure needs to be unique at least for all items that have the same sorting key):

a.sort_by {|h| [-h[:bar],-h[:foo]]}
 => [{:foo=>2, :bar=>1}, {:foo=>1, :bar=>1}]
a.sort_by {|h| [h[:bar],h[:foo]]}.reverse
 => [{:foo=>2, :bar=>1}, {:foo=>1, :bar=>1}]
1
  • +1 for pointing out that the semantics of reverse are different. I believe it will also mess up a previous sort, in the case where one is trying to apply multiple sorts in some order.
    – johncip
    Jun 6, 2018 at 7:01
7

What about:

 a.sort {|x,y| y[:bar]<=>x[:bar]}

It works!!

irb
>> a = [
?>   { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 2 },
?>   { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 3 },
?>   { :foo => 'foo', :bar => 5 },
?> ]
=> [{:bar=>2, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>3, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>5, :foo=>"foo"}]

>>  a.sort {|x,y| y[:bar]<=>x[:bar]}
=> [{:bar=>5, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>3, :foo=>"foo"}, {:bar=>2, :foo=>"foo"}]
2
  • Yeah it actually works, but I think the PO wants to show intent with the code (he has a working solution already). Apr 15, 2010 at 1:42
  • While sort will work, it's only faster when sorting immediate values. If you have to dig for them sort_by is faster. See the benchmark. Nov 10, 2019 at 5:15
4

Regarding the benchmark suite mentioned, these results also hold for sorted arrays.

sort_by/reverse it is:

# foo.rb
require 'benchmark'

NUM_RUNS = 1000

# arr = []
arr1 = 3000.times.map { { num: rand(1000) } }
arr2 = 3000.times.map { |n| { num: n } }.reverse

Benchmark.bm(20) do |x|
  { 'randomized'     => arr1,
    'sorted'         => arr2 }.each do |label, arr|
    puts '---------------------------------------------------'
    puts label

    x.report('sort_by / reverse') {
      NUM_RUNS.times { arr.sort_by { |h| h[:num] }.reverse }
    }
    x.report('sort_by -') {
      NUM_RUNS.times { arr.sort_by { |h| -h[:num] } }
    }
  end
end

And the results:

$: ruby foo.rb
                           user     system      total        real
---------------------------------------------------
randomized
sort_by / reverse      1.680000   0.010000   1.690000 (  1.682051)
sort_by -              1.830000   0.000000   1.830000 (  1.830359)
---------------------------------------------------
sorted
sort_by / reverse      0.400000   0.000000   0.400000 (  0.402990)
sort_by -              0.500000   0.000000   0.500000 (  0.499350)
1
  • You should be able to do sort_by{}.reverse! (reverse without the bang creates an new array and I'd expect that to be slower of course) Sep 15, 2017 at 18:34
3

For those folks who like to measure speed in IPS ;)

require 'benchmark/ips'

ary = []
1000.times { 
  ary << {:bar => rand(1000)} 
}

Benchmark.ips do |x|
  x.report("sort")               { ary.sort{ |a,b| b[:bar] <=> a[:bar] } }
  x.report("sort reverse")       { ary.sort{ |a,b| a[:bar] <=> b[:bar] }.reverse }
  x.report("sort_by -a[:bar]")   { ary.sort_by{ |a| -a[:bar] } }
  x.report("sort_by a[:bar]*-1") { ary.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar]*-1 } }
  x.report("sort_by.reverse!")   { ary.sort_by{ |a| a[:bar] }.reverse }
  x.compare!
end

And results:

Warming up --------------------------------------
                sort    93.000  i/100ms
        sort reverse    91.000  i/100ms
    sort_by -a[:bar]   382.000  i/100ms
  sort_by a[:bar]*-1   398.000  i/100ms
    sort_by.reverse!   397.000  i/100ms
Calculating -------------------------------------
                sort    938.530  (± 1.8%) i/s -      4.743k in   5.055290s
        sort reverse    901.157  (± 6.1%) i/s -      4.550k in   5.075351s
    sort_by -a[:bar]      3.814k (± 4.4%) i/s -     19.100k in   5.019260s
  sort_by a[:bar]*-1      3.732k (± 4.3%) i/s -     18.706k in   5.021720s
    sort_by.reverse!      3.928k (± 3.6%) i/s -     19.850k in   5.060202s

Comparison:
    sort_by.reverse!:     3927.8 i/s
    sort_by -a[:bar]:     3813.9 i/s - same-ish: difference falls within error
  sort_by a[:bar]*-1:     3732.3 i/s - same-ish: difference falls within error
                sort:      938.5 i/s - 4.19x  slower
        sort reverse:      901.2 i/s - 4.36x  slower
2

Simple Solution from ascending to descending and vice versa is:

STRINGS

str = ['ravi', 'aravind', 'joker', 'poker']
asc_string = str.sort # => ["aravind", "joker", "poker", "ravi"]
asc_string.reverse # => ["ravi", "poker", "joker", "aravind"]

DIGITS

digit = [234,45,1,5,78,45,34,9]
asc_digit = digit.sort # => [1, 5, 9, 34, 45, 45, 78, 234]
asc_digit.reverse # => [234, 78, 45, 45, 34, 9, 5, 1]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.