8

There's a very common problem that is very easy to get into with haskell. Code-snippet that describes it is this:

data JobDescription = JobOne { n :: Int }
                    | JobTwo
                    | JobThree { n :: Int }
  deriving (Show, Eq)

taskOneWorker :: JobDescription -> IO ()
taskOneWorker t = do
    putStrLn $ "n: " ++ (show $ n t)

main :: IO ()
main = do
  -- this runs ok:
  taskOneWorker (JobOne 10)

  -- this fails at runtime:
  -- taskOneWorker JobTwo

  -- this works, but we didn't want it to:
  -- taskOneWorker (JobThree 10)

I described this problem and it's possible solutions in this article: https://www.fpcomplete.com/user/k_bx/playing-with-datakinds

Here, on StackOverflow, I'd like to ask you -- what are the best solutions to this problem, using which tools and what documentation?

  • 2
    IMO, the only problem here is that Haskell allows you to declare field accessors at all in a multi-field ADT. I consider that abuse of record syntax, just don't do it and there is no problem. – leftaroundabout Oct 18 '14 at 13:38
  • @leftaroundabout sure. The problem with my production code I have is that field-accessors are there already, and use quite heavily everywhere. So I want to continue having field-accessors (to not do crazy refactoring), but still get type-safety. – Kostiantyn Rybnikov Oct 18 '14 at 13:44
  • 1
    Just define a new function nOne :: JobDescription -> Int that only works for JobOnes. – Tom Ellis Oct 18 '14 at 19:02
  • 1
    @TomEllis and in case of getting JobTwo -- would it throw an exception? Hehe. // actually, that's the actual problem, some of my code already works only with JobOne, while got JobTwo and "crashed" – Kostiantyn Rybnikov Oct 18 '14 at 19:34
  • Oh, I thought you wanted taskOneWorker JobTwo to crash, so I just copied the behaviour. If you don't want it to crash you should use Prisms. – Tom Ellis Oct 18 '14 at 20:30
2

I suggest using a Prism. The Prism _JobOne represents the Int value that lives inside the JobOne constructor. In taskOneWorker we look it up using ^?. Either the value t is indeed a JobOne constructor and its argument is return in the Just, or it is not a JobOne constructor and we get back a Nothing.

{-# LANGUAGE TemplateHaskell #-}

import Control.Lens

data JobDescription = JobOne { n :: Int }
                    | JobTwo
                    | JobThree { n :: Int }
  deriving (Show, Eq)
$(makePrisms ''JobDescription)

taskOneWorker :: JobDescription -> IO ()
taskOneWorker t = do
  case t ^? _JobOne of
    Just n  -> putStrLn $ "n: " ++ show n
    Nothing -> putStrLn "Not a JobOne"
               -- Or 'return ()' if you want to ignore these cases

main :: IO ()
main = do
  taskOneWorker (JobOne 10)
  taskOneWorker JobTwo
  taskOneWorker (JobThree 10)

-- *Main> main
-- n: 10
-- Not a JobOne
-- Not a JobOne
  • 3
    This seems as a poor option to me, in case when taskOneWorker is clearly considered to work with exactly JobOne (and not JobTwo or JobThree) this leads taskOneWorker to have more boilerplate and less type-safety than solution from link in original post. – Kostiantyn Rybnikov Oct 18 '14 at 20:46
-2

yeah; using lenses like you have and abstracting the "n" thing into some sort of "JobData" seems not too bad to me (maybe even good.)

  • Well, it lets you avoid run-time crashes with minimal effort (no need for DataKinds) for sure, but still would be nice to limit parameters via types when it makes sense. – Kostiantyn Rybnikov Oct 18 '14 at 13:43

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